Diversity Recruiting Statistics 2023 - Everything You Need to Know

Are you looking to add Diversity Recruiting to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Diversity Recruiting statistics of 2023.

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How much of an impact will Diversity Recruiting have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Diversity Recruiting? We will answer all your Diversity Recruiting related questions here.

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Best Diversity Recruiting Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 531 Diversity Recruiting Statistics on this page 🙂

Diversity Recruiting Benefits Statistics

  • Almost all employees surveyed (94%). [0]
  • The top two pieces of information job seekers look for when researching a company or looking at job ads are salary (67%) and benefits (63%). [0]
  • Companies that use benefits strategically experience better overall company performance (58% vs. 34%), above average effectiveness in recruitment (19% vs. 8%), and higher retention than companies that don’t (28% vs. 11%). [0]
  • Among respondents to our survey, companies with 500+ employees were more likely to offer additional inclusive resources and benefits to employees. [1]
  • 49% of recent grads accepted a lower salary or compromised on benefits. [2]

Diversity Recruiting Market Statistics

  • Inclusive companies are 1.7x more likely to be innovation leaders in their market. [3]
  • Diverse companies are 70% more likely to report that the firm captured a new market. [3]
  • The overwhelming majority [of managers] (bordering on 90%). [3]
  • According to a 2013 report, diverse companies are 70 percent more likely to capture new markets. [4]
  • Another Deloitte survey found that 39 percent of respondents believed diversity and inclusion offers a competitive advantage in the marketplace. [4]
  • Diverse companies are 70% more likely to capture new markets than those that have a lack of diversity. [5]
  • Diverse teams are 70% more likely to capture new markets. [6]
  • Diverse companies are 70% more likely to capture new markets. [6]
  • Companies with leadership that exhibited 2 D diversity outperformed their peers, were more likely to experience greater innovation, and proved able to attract new markets. [7]
  • 36% of employees say a company’s market reputation is “very important” when considering a new job. [2]
  • 39% of women vs. 33% of men say market reputation is “very important” when considering a new job. [2]
  • 40% of Millennials say market reputation has the biggest influence on their impression of an employer. [2]

Diversity Recruiting Latest Statistics

  • A SHRM report recently noted that 41% of managers are “too busy” to implement diversity initiatives. [8]
  • 79% of these same employees also believe that their company is already diverse, while only 20% value hiring women in leadership positions, and 14% value a focus on LGBTQ awareness and sensitivity. [8]
  • 33% of Black employees aspire to leadership positions, but only one tenth of them ever make it there. [8]
  • Only 1% reach CEO at Fortune 500 level companies, and all of them are men. [8]
  • When you look at the rate that Black students complete the necessary degree to be eligible for a Fortune 500 CEO position, the appropriate number should be at least 10%. [8]
  • In Orchestras, when companies switched from auditions where they could see the candidate to blind auditions, the percentage of female members in the orchestra jumped from 5% to 25%. [8]
  • African Americans make up 13% of the US population, yet less than half of their share is represented in big tech. [8]
  • It’s beneficial to your bottom line,19% moreto be exact. [8]
  • It attracts a wide array (67%). [8]
  • Itsparks creative talentand promotesbetter decision making, 87% of the time, within the company and its leaders, as opposed to leaders that are in need of diversity. [8]
  • Large and institutional companies become more diverse over time with new politics, but the work is diluted as 52% of Fortune 500 companies have either gone bankrupt or been acquired in the last decade. [3]
  • 69% of executives rate diversity and inclusion as an important issue in 2017, up 32% from 2014. [3]
  • Global Human Capital Trends research shows that 78% of respondents now believe diversity and inclusion is a competitive advantage (39% say it is a “significant” competitive advantage). [3]
  • A 2014 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that managers of both sexes were twice as likely to hire a man as a woman. [3]
  • Companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on executive teams were 21% more likely to outperform on profitability and 27% more likely to have superior value creation. [3]
  • Companies with the most ethnically/culturally diverse boards worldwide are 43% more likely to experience higher profits. [3]
  • 57% of employees want their company to do more to increase diversity. [3]
  • A recent study shows 81% of Gen Z’s have one or more friends of a different race. [3]
  • ( SMC 12. Hispanics or Latinos whose family origins are in Central or South America and other locations besides Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Cuba accounted for 26 % of the Hispanic or Latino labor force in 2016, up from 22 % in 1988. [3]
  • From 1980 to 2020, the minority working age portion of the workforce is projected to double to 37% from 18%. [3]
  • Millennials will comprise 75% of America’s workforce by 2025. [3]
  • There are 76 million baby boomers, and 72% of them are white. [3]
  • The millennials are an even larger group with 87 million, but much more diverse only 56% are white. [3]
  • 45% think that hiring managers are in the best position to increase diversity. [3]
  • 38% of executives report that the primary sponsor of the company’s diversity and inclusion efforts is the CEO. [3]
  • Highly inclusive organizations generate 2.3x more cash flow per employee, 1.4x more revenue, and are 120% more capable of meeting financial targets. [3]
  • Companies whose senior management teams are more than 15% female had a 5% higher return on equity. [3]
  • Facebook has increased its overall representation of black employees to a mere 3% in the United States, up from 2% in 2014. [3]
  • Companies in the top quartile for gender diversity are 15% more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians. [3]
  • The unemployment rate went down for veterans in 2016 to 5.1%, a record low. [3]
  • Pew’s survey found that 34% of the respondents believe that male executives are better than women at assuming risk. [3]
  • Only 4% of Fortune 500 companies have women CEOs. [3]
  • 43% of companies are now offering holidays that allow employees to take time off based on their religious or cultural situation. [3]
  • 50% of men think women are well represented in companies where 10% of senior leaders are women. [3]
  • 13% of employers monitor how much time is spent discussing inclusion and diversity at senior management meetings. [3]
  • The updated workforce data shows that women make up 31% of all employees at Google. [3]
  • 76% of its [The Microsoft Company]. [3]
  • overall workforce is male, while only 24 % is female. [3]
  • And only 3% are black. [3]
  • 67% of both active and passive job seekers say that when they’re evaluating companies and job offers, it is important that the company has a diverse workforce. [3]
  • Only 20% of C suite roles are held by women. [3]
  • Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35% more likely to have returns above national industry medians. [3]
  • 74% of Amazon executives are white men. [3]
  • That compares to 68% at Apple, 65% at Google, and 51% at Facebook. [3]
  • A study from Boston Consulting Group found that companies with aboveaverage diversity on their leadership team generated 19% more revenue due to innovation than companies with below. [9]
  • However, the challenges of the pandemic have significantly impacted working mothers, resulting in nearly two million women considering leaving the workforce, according to McKinsey’s Women in the Workplace 2020 Report. [9]
  • McKinsey reports that companies with well represented female leadership can have close to 50% higher profits than companies that lack female leadership. [9]
  • Additionally, more than 50% of women in senior leader roles advocate for gender and racial diversity in their workplace. [9]
  • According to Pew Research Group, the median annual earnings for a STEM professional is $77,400 compared to $46,900 for those who work in non. [9]
  • However, the same study found that Hispanics hold only 8% of STEM jobs in the U.S., despite making up 17% of the workforce. [9]
  • Black/African Americans hold only 9% of STEM jobs while making up 11% of the workforce. [9]
  • Whites comprise 67% of STEM jobs but account for 63% of the workforce. [9]
  • A McKinsey report found there are 64% fewer Asian American men and 39% fewer Asian American women in senior roles compared to entry. [9]
  • According to an IBM study, Asian Americans account for 4.4% of Fortune 1000 board seats and only 1.47% of those seats are held by Asian American women. [9]
  • The National Human Rights Campaign Foundation reports that 51% of LGBTQ+ employees hide their sexual and/or gender identity at work. [9]
  • 58% say they’ve heard jokes or derogatory comments about LGBTQ+ people but only 5% reported those issues to human resources. [9]
  • They discovered that distinctively Black names reduced the probability of employer contact by 2.1 percentage points compared to distinctively White names. [9]
  • A joint study from the Call of Duty Endowment and ZipRecruiter found that 31.8% of veteran professionals are “underemployed,” meaning they settle for jobs where “employment is at a skill level below that which the job seekers were objectively qualified for.”. [9]
  • In fact, 3 in 4 job seekers say they value workplace diversity when considering an opportunity, according to the Glassdoor Survey referenced earlier in this article. [9]
  • Groups formerly seen as “minorities” may reach majority status by 2044 48 percent of Generation Z are racial or ethnic minorities Diverse companies enjoy 2.3 times higher cash flow per employee. [4]
  • Diverse management has been shown to increase revenue by 19 percent. [4]
  • Gender diverse companies are 15 percent more likely to beat industry median financial returns More than 3 out of 4 workers prefer diverse companies. [4]
  • People who identify as white, non Hispanic in the United States declined in numbers for the first time on record, falling below 58 percent of the country’s population in 2020. [4]
  • It decreased from 63.7 percent in 2010. [4]
  • Census data shows that 57 percent of Millennials are white. [4]
  • In 2020, unemployment rates among veterans increased for both men and women, which are now at 6.5 percent and 6.7 percent, respectively. [4]
  • In 2019, the overall national unemployment rate was 3.7 percent, and unemployment rates were higher than the national rate for people who are Black and Hispanic or Latinx. [4]
  • Pre pandemic, though, the unemployment rate for people with less than a high school diploma was between 5 and 6 percent. [4]
  • That’s up from 19.2 percent of families the previous year. [4]
  • Additionally, that percentage goes up to 24.3 percent for Black families. [4]
  • That’s compared to 7.6 percent of heterosexual married couple families where only the wife was employed. [4]
  • In 2019, the unemployment rate of foreign born workers was 3.1 percent. [4]
  • For reference, 17 percent of the U.S. workforce is foreign born. [4]
  • Women Are Expected to Make Up 47.2 Percent of the Workforce by 2024. [4]
  • Within a few short years, women could make up 47.2 percent of the workforce. [4]
  • In 2019, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that fulltime working women had median usual weekly earnings of 82 percent compared with full. [4]
  • A 2017 Pew Research Survey revealed that 42 percent of women in the United States say they have faced workplace gender discrimination. [4]
  • One study conducted by Harvard University and Princeton University researchers found that when men and women submitted blind applications or auditions for a job, a woman’s likelihood of getting the job increased by 25 to 46 percent. [4]
  • In a 2021 report, McKinsey found that women in senior management were twice as likely as men in similar roles to spend “substantial time” on DEI work falling outside their normal job responsibilities, such as supporting employee resource groups. [4]
  • Additionally, the same report found that, between entry level and the C suite, the representation of women of color drops off by more than 75 percent. [4]
  • That number drops to 14 percent when looking at women holding C suite roles at tech hardware companies. [4]
  • Of the 23 percent of women in the C suite, just 4 percent of those leaders are women of color. [4]
  • But they receive them 5 percent less often than men do. [4]
  • The Majority of the U.S. Workforce Is Made Up of White People. [4]
  • Black people make up around 13 percent of the workforce, Hispanic or Latinx people make up 18 percent of the workforce and Asian people make up about 6 percent of the workforce, as of 2019. [4]
  • The underemployment rate in the first half of 2019 was 3.3 percent for white people, 6.6 percent for Black people and 4.4 percent for Hispanic or Latinx people. [4]
  • A Boston Consulting Group study looked at companies with diverse management teams and found that, on average, they enjoyed a 19 percent increase in revenue compared to their less diverse counterparts. [4]
  • Not only is it beneficial to have diverse employees and management, but companies with diverse boards also noticed significantly higher profits, according to a 2018 McKinsey study. [4]
  • Executive teams that are highly gender diverse are found to be 21 percent more likely to outperform on profitability. [4]
  • Gender diverse companies that are in the top quartile for gender diversity on executive boards are 27 percent more likely to have superior value creation. [4]
  • McKinsey found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity are 15 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians. [4]
  • Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 percent more likely to outperform their respective national industry medians’ financial returns. [4]
  • Compared to individual decision makers, diverse teams make better decisions 87 percent of the time. [4]
  • Boston Consulting Group surveyed 1,700 companies and found that companies with above average total diversity had 19 percent higher innovation revenues on average. [4]
  • When companies foster a more inclusive work environment, 83 percent of Millennials are found to be actively engaged in their work. [4]
  • For every 10 percent increase in gender diversity among senior executive teams in the United Kingdom, companies earn 3.5 percent more in earnings before interest and taxes. [4]
  • According to a 2020 Glassdoor survey, 76 percent of job seekers and employees polled said a diverse workforce was an important factor for them when evaluating job opportunities and companies. [4]
  • According to a Deloitte survey, 80 percent of over 1,300 respondents said inclusion efforts were an important factor when choosing a company. [4]
  • In fact, 13 percent of employees monitor how often senior managers discuss the topics during meetings. [4]
  • In the same study as above, 40 percent of respondents noted their company could improve its diversity of sexual orientation. [4]
  • Another study found 40 percent of employees who have experienced harassment, bullying or stereotyping quit their jobs and seek alternative employment opportunities. [4]
  • Since 2014, there’s been a 32 percent increase in executives prioritizing diversity and inclusion at their companies. [4]
  • Even though the majority of executives believe diversity and inclusion are important issues, 38 percent also believe CEOs are responsible for taking action. [4]
  • but, according to PwC, 74 percent of men also seek employers with diversity and inclusion strategies in place. [4]
  • 37% of workers and job seekers said they wouldn’t apply to a company that was rated negatively by people of color. [10]
  • One disparity they may address is the stalled leadership progression of women and minorities, of whom only 29% and 17%, respectively, reach the C. [10]
  • According to Gartner, one way to make more tangible progress toward DEI goals in 2023 is to hold leaders accountable, vs. the collective accountability approach that many companies have taken. [10]
  • But only 45% of those respondents believe their company’s DEI policies actually do include those with intellectual disabilities. [10]
  • That staggering 242% increase makes it clear that more diverse hiring is possible — companies just need to commit to it. [10]
  • According to the same Gallup study, only 41% of U.S. managers said they had received training or education around diversity, equity, inclusion, racism, racial justice, or other related topics. [10]
  • 52% identify as white, one in four as Hispanic, 14% as Black, 6% as Asian, and 5% as another race or two or more races. [10]
  • In comparison, 61% of Millennials identified as white in 2002. [10]
  • The Washington Post found that at the 50 most valuable public companies in the U.S., only 8% of top executives were Black. [10]
  • A recent study involving over 83,000 job applications found that compared to applicants with distinctively white names, those with distinctively Black names were less likely to be contacted by an employer. [10]
  • Among Russell 3000 companies, gender representation is on the rise, with women holding 25% of board seats in 2021. [10]
  • Among private companies, however, the numbers are not as promising — 60% of companies have no women on their board. [10]
  • That lack of representation certainly hurts companies’ bottom lines, considering that when women are on executive teams, earnings improve by as much as 55 percent. [10]
  • By 2024, it’s projected that employees age 55+ will make up 24.8% of the workforce, as compared to 11.9% in 1994. [5]
  • Women are expected to make up a larger portion of the overall US workforce; rising from 46.8% of the workforce in 2014 to 47.2% in 2024. [5]
  • Our workforce is getting increasingly diverse By 2024, less than 60% of the US labor force is expected to be defined as “white non. [5]
  • As recently as 1994, over 75% of the labor force fell into that category. [5]
  • In 2019, women’s wages were 82% of those of male full time wage and salary workers. [5]
  • In 2019, White women earned 82% as much as Asians ; Blacks earned 69%; and Hispanics earned 63%. [5]
  • Companies with greater than 30% female executives were more likely to outperform those with 10% – 30% women executives. [5]
  • Gender diverse companies with aboveaverage levels of employee engagement financially outperform companies with below average diversity and engagement by 46% to 58%. [5]
  • In 2018, women made up 53% percent of the Black labor force. [5]
  • In 2019, Black people only held 3.2% of the senior leadership roles at large companies in the U.S. and just 0.8% of all Fortune 500 CEO positions. [5]
  • Employers that posted more about diversity on LinkedIn in 2020 received 26% more applications from women, compared to companies that posted less. [5]
  • ( Nearly 70% of active and passive job seekers evaluate whether a company’s workforce is diverse before applying or accepting a job offer. [5]
  • 57% of employees think their companies should be more diverse. [5]
  • In 2021 “Indifference” (33%) and “lack of top level commitment” (22%). [5]
  • Only 11% of companies are usingAI technologyto identify hardto reach candidate pools; 63% of companies aren’t currently using AI in any part of the hiring process. [5]
  • “Blind hiring” works astudy by the National Bureau of Economic Researchfound that all else being equal, resumes with “whitesounding” names received nearly 50% more callbacks than those with “black. [5]
  • Another study found that blind auditions increased the likelihood that a woman would be hired by between 25 and 46%. [5]
  • [Read more How To Avoid The 12 Kinds Of Hiring Bias In Your Recruitment Process The national GDP would increase by $25 billion if just 1% more disabled people were hired. [5]
  • “A 2013 study of veteran hiring, performance and turnover found that veterans, on average, perform at higher levels and are less likely to turnover, generating positive outcomes for businesses. [5]
  • The analysis showed that for a company of 1,000 employees with 25 percent veteran new hires, cost savings amounted to $325,000 per year.”. [5]
  • “Cognitive diversity” — diversity in thoughts, ideas, and values — can increase innovation by 20%. [5]
  • 75% of employees think more diversity is needed in their workplace. [5]
  • Company profits and share performance can be close to 50% higher when women are well represented in senior leadership positions. [5]
  • More diverse companies had 19% higher innovation revenues. [5]
  • Businesses with more racially and ethnically diverse workforces have a 35% performance advantage over those that are homogenous. [5]
  • Diversity drives better decisions researchers found that diverse teams outperformed individual decision makers in making a business decision up to 87% of the time. [5]
  • Companies in the top 25% for ethnic and cultural diversity were 36% more profitable than those in the bottom 25%. [5]
  • In one survey, 80% of respondents said that inclusion was important when choosing an employer. [5]
  • 23% of respondents in that same survey said they have already left one company for a more inclusive one. [5]
  • 43% of companies are now offering holidays that allow employees to take time off based on their religion or cultural affiliation. [5]
  • Inclusive teams outperform their peers by 80% in team. [5]
  • Inclusive companies had 2.3x higher cash flow per employee over a three year period and were 1.7x more likely to be “innovation leaders” in their sector. [5]
  • More than 3 out of 4 job seekers and employees (76%). [11]
  • Having a diverse workforce is particularly important to underrepresented groups Nearly a third of employees and job seekers (32%). [11]
  • This figure is significantly higher for Black (41%) job seekers and employees when compared to white (30%) job seekers and employees, and is also higher among LGBTQ (41%) job seekers and employees when compared to non LGBTQ (32%). [11]
  • Moreover, nearly 37% of employees would not apply to a job at a company where there are disparities in employee satisfaction ratings among different ethnic/racial groups. [11]
  • Collecting feedback should be done anonymously, as 71% of employees say they are more likely to do so if they don’t have to share their identity. [11]
  • It’s estimated that 97 million new jobs will be created by 2023, which presents a significant opportunity. [0]
  • More than 90% of employers report they are hiring for new roles in 2021, as they continue to respond, recover and readapt in the new world of work. [0]
  • 75% of HR professionals believe that there is a skills gap among their applicants. [0]
  • Over a third (35%). [0]
  • 66% of business leaders agree that strategic education programs attract new talent. [0]
  • professionals expect their recruiting budget to decrease this year while 66% anticipate their learning and development budget to increase or stay the same. [0]
  • ( 70% of US employees say they’re at least somewhat likely to leave their current company and accept an offer with a new company that’s known for investing in employee learning and development. [0]
  • 51% of L&D pros agree that internal mobility – tapping into internal talent pools – is more of a priority now than before COVID. [0]
  • Internal hires increased in April August 2020 compared with the same time period in 2019, and now make up almost 20% of an organization’s workforce on average. [0]
  • ( 82% of L&D pros agree that engaged learners are more likely to find new roles in their organization. [0]
  • ( 86% of Glassdoor users read company reviews and ratings before making a decision to apply for a job. [0]
  • 72% of recruiting leaders worldwide agreed that employer brand has a significant impact on hiring. [0]
  • ( 46% of HR, procurement and C suite leaders say a strong brand leads to stronger engagement and higher productivity. [0]
  • 96% of employer branding and recruitment specialists use social media. [0]
  • The top reasons employees are looking or would consider leaving their company were “compensation” (52%), “career advancement” (43%), and “lack of recognition” (19%). [0]
  • When companies invested in corporate responsibility and company culture, their turnover reduced 50%, employee productivity increased by up to 13%, and engagement increased by up to 7.5%. [0]
  • Nearly half (45%). [0]
  • Only 23% of employees call them “more than” or “very” committed. [0]
  • 56% of workers ranked a strong workplace culture as more important than salary, with more than threein four workers saying they’d consider a company’s culture before applying for a job there. [0]
  • Only 31% of HR leaders say their organizations have the culture they need to drive future business and. [0]
  • just 21% say that their employees deeply trust company leaders. [0]
  • More than 3 in 4 employees and job seekers (76%). [0]
  • Organizations with diverse management have 19% higher revenue when compared to those who have below. [0]
  • Only 25% of organizations set gender diversity targets while creating their hiring strategy. [0]
  • 78% of HR professionals say that diversity in the workplace is impacting how they hire. [0]
  • ( The national GDP would increase $25 billion if just 1% more disabled people were hired. [0]
  • Nearly 90% of employers have a diversity recruiting strategy for the class of 2021. [0]
  • 89%Increase in the number of female employeesglobally 71%Increase in the number of Black employees. [12]
  • 87%Increase in the number of female employees in leadership. [12]
  • globally 80%Increase in the number of employees from URCs in leadership in the U.S. 84%Increase in the number of Black employees in leadership in the U.S. 90%Increase in the number of Hispanic/Latinx employees in leadershipin the U.S. [12]
  • We’re making progress in increasing representation, and currently, 50 percent of our workforce in the U.S. is made up of people from underrepresented communities. [12]
  • Because even a 1 percent improvement impacts a substantial number of people, increasing overall representation takes time. [12]
  • Compared to the previous year, open leadership roles filled by women globally increased by 10 percentage points overall, and by 8 percentage points in. [12]
  • R&D. And in the U.S., open leadership roles filled by people from underrepresented communities increased by 16 percentage points overall, and by 9 percentage points in. [12]
  • R&D. 47%Open leadership roles filled by women. [12]
  • R&D leadership roles filled by women globally 59%Open leadership roles filled by people from URCs in the U.S. [12]
  • Retail leadership roles globally filled by women since January 2021 67%Increase in the number of female employees globally since 2014. [12]
  • 76%Open Retail leadership roles in the U.S. filled by people from URCs since January 2021. [12]
  • 47%Increase in the number of employees from URCs in the U.S. since 2014. [12]
  • U.S. leadershiproles filled by Hispanic/Latinx candidates 23%Open U.S. Retailleadership roles filledby Black candidates. [12]
  • Totals may not add up to 100% due to rounding. [12]
  • 32%are age 18 to 29;30%are age 33 to 44;24%are age 45 to 60 and14%are. [13]
  • This is similar to last year’s findings, where 82% of respondents indicated they consider diversity part of an ideal workplace. [13]
  • It looks like employers agree – 87% of respondents to the say their leaders believe diversity recruitment is important and should be a priority. [13]
  • Well, 83% of respondents indicate it’s important enough to be a consideration when deciding whether to accept a job. [13]
  • That’s a big shift from 64% in 2018. [13]
  • About one in four (26%). [13]
  • most talent acquisition experts who participated in our employer benchmark survey believe their organizations are positioned to show their commitment to job seekers – 81% have a strategy to recruit a diverse workforce. [13]
  • 70% of employees indicate they would be reluctant to accept a job from a company that claims it is diverse but doesn’t have any executive leaders from underrepresented groups. [13]
  • This is another dramatic shift from 2018, when 52% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed. [13]
  • Taking it one step further, 63% of employee respondents indicate they’d be reluctant to accept a job from a company if no employees from underrepresented groups are involved in the interview process. [13]
  • That’s 11% higher than last year, when 52% reported they would be reluctant. [13]
  • This is the opposite of last year’s results, which placed job satisfaction first (48%) and pay equity second (44%). [13]
  • Awaken Most job seekers (77%). [13]
  • respondents gave greater weight to these options – 49% selected diversity in management and 39% selected diversity in executive leadership. [13]
  • 42% of employers are posting roles onspecialized job boards; only 21% of employee survey respondents consider this important. [13]
  • Employers say recruiting at national diversity conferences ranks fourth (29%). [13]
  • Yet, 54% feel they don’t regularly get respect from their leaders. [14]
  • Yet a whopping 75% of employees in underrepresented groups don’t feel they’ve personally benefited from their company’s programs. [14]
  • The top three areas of concern for employees were diversity in thought (55%), race/ethnicity (44%), and gender (33%). [14]
  • And 28% of respondents are developing metrics. [14]
  • There are lots of ways to measure success but Forbes found the three most popular metrics for diversity and inclusion are Employee productivity (77%) Employee morale (67%) Employee turnover (58%). [14]
  • By 2020, the caucasian population is expected to drop to 63% of the total U.S. population. [6]
  • Only 40% of women feel satisfied with the decision making process at their organization. [6]
  • 57% of employees think their company should be doing more to increase diversity. [6]
  • 41% of managers state they are “too busy” to implement any kind of diversity and inclusion initiatives. [6]
  • African Americans are 50% less likely to receive callbacks compared to white candidates. [6]
  • 7.4% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women. [6]
  • Highly gender diverse executive teams are 21% more likely to outperform on profitability. [6]
  • Genderdiverse companies that are also in the topquartile for gender diverse executive boards are 27% more likely to have superior value creation. [6]
  • 85% of CEOs with diverse and inclusive cultures notice increased profits. [6]
  • Companies with equal men and women earn 41% more revenue. [6]
  • Racially and ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to perform better. [6]
  • Diverse teams are 87% better at making decisions. [6]
  • Inclusive companies are 120% more likely to hit financial goals. [6]
  • Women make up 50.8% of the U.S. population. [6]
  • Women make up 46.9% of the workforce. [6]
  • Millennials make up the largest percentage of the workforce at 35%. [6]
  • Hispanics or Latinos comprise 16.8% of the workforce. [6]
  • Pending the results of the 2020 U.S. Census, the white population is expected to drop from 82% of the total American population in 1980 to just 63% in 2020. [6]
  • Hispanics and Latinos are expected to see the largest growth in population percentage, from 6% in 1980 to 17% in 2020. [6]
  • The ethnic makeup of the country projects to be 46% white, 24% Hispanic, 14% Asian, and 13% Black. [6]
  • Women often feel left out of the decisionmaking processes of their organization, while 70% of men feel satisfied with their organization’s decision. [6]
  • When hiring initiatives are completely blind, however, some studies have shown women are 25% to 46% more likely to be hired than men. [6]
  • That percentage is by far the highest in Fortune 500 history, a number that represents just 37 women. [6]
  • Considering 38% of managers and executives believe CEOs are primarily responsible for increasing diversity and inclusion, it’s good to know that CEOs themselves see positive results. [6]
  • Racially and ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to perform better financially. [6]
  • McKinsey research found that companies in the top quartile of ethnic diversity are 35% more likely to see financial performance above the national industry median. [6]
  • A study of 600 business decisions made by 200 teams found that when diverse teams made a business decision, they outperformed individuals 87% of the time and were shown to make decisions faster than individuals. [6]
  • Figure 1 Percent of employers with a diversity recruiting strategy 2017 – 2021*. [15]
  • Percent of Respondents87.2% Percent of RespondentsNA Percent of Respondents82.1%. [15]
  • Percent of Respondents88.0% Percent of Respondents80.3%. [15]
  • Recruiting Class Percent of Respondents 2020. [15]
  • Students with disabilities AfricanAmericans 94.4% 93.9% 93.6%. [15]
  • 90.1% 89.9% 94.3% 89.0% HispanicAmericans 84.0% 88.5% 86.4% 87.2% Military veterans 75.3% 70.9% 71.4%. [15]
  • Multiracial 56.4% 61.0% AsianAmericans 51.9% 52.7% 56.4% 54.7% Native Americans 45.1% 44.6% 49.3% 51.7% LGBTQIA 46.9% 54.7% 48.6% 51.7% Students with disabilities 50.6% 52.0% 50.7%. [15]
  • Only Colleges 18.3% 22.4% 19.4% 15.0% INROADS 17.4% 28.2% 16.1%. [15]
  • The millennial and Gen Z generations are the most diverse in history only 56% of the 87 million millennials in the country are white, as compared to 72% of the 76 million members of the baby boomer generation. [7]
  • In the 40 years between 1980 and 2020, the white working age population will have declined from 83% of the nation’s total to 63% while the number of minority workers will have doubled. [7]
  • Because 45% of American workers experienced discrimination and/or harassment in the past year. [7]
  • Only 40% of women feel satisfied with the decision making process at their organization (versus 70% of men). [7]
  • This, combined with the fact that only ⅔ of women feel they can voice a dissenting opinion without fear of repercussion (versus 80% of men). [7]
  • According to the study, “without diverse leadership, women are 20% less likely than straight white men to win endorsement for their ideas; people of color are 24% less likely; and [those who identify as] LGBT are 21% less likely.”. [7]
  • Higher representation of women in C suite level positions results in 34% greater returns to shareholders. [7]
  • A look at the Fortune 1000 list of companies shows how important female CEOs are for a company’s success while only 5% of companies are run by women, those organizations contribute 7% of the total revenue of the Fortune 1000 list. [7]
  • As Figure 4 shows, while most responding companies purposely included images depicting diverse identities of their employees in their recruitment materials, only 28 percent have incorporated diversity into their mission statement. [1]
  • As Figure 5 depicts, only a slight majority of employers taking part in our study offered diversity training. [1]
  • While 38 percent of employers with 1,000+ employees reported having single stall non gendered restrooms, only 25 percent of companies with fewer than 100 employees reported the same. [1]
  • Overall, only 34.1 percent of companies surveyed offered some form of a non gendered restroom option for their employees. [1]
  • As Figure 7 shows, the majority of respondents included sexual orientation and gender identity in the nondiscrimination policies, but more than one third of employers still ask about gender on applications. [1]
  • Regarding dress code, 19 percent of respondents stated that their organization has a dress code policy that impacts only one gender. [1]
  • Finally, related to non discrimination policies, a slight majority of respondents answered that their organization has sponsored at least one international employee. [1]
  • Of the companies that sponsored international employees, 62.5 percent were smaller than 1,000 employees. [1]
  • 96% of job seekers say that it’s important to work for a company that embraces transparency. [2]
  • 79% of job seekers say they are likely to use social media in their job search and this increases to 86% for younger job seekers. [2]
  • 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to check candidates. [2]
  • After finding a job opening, 64% of candidates said they research a company online and 37% said they will move on to another job opening if they can’t find information on the company. [2]
  • 91% of employers prefer their candidates to have work experience, and 65% of them prefer their candidates to have relevant work experience. [2]
  • 87% of Millennials rate professional career growth and developmental opportunities as important to them in a job. [2]
  • Nearly 80% of Millennials look for people and culture fit with employers, followed by career potential. [2]
  • In 2015, 51% of those who did have jobs were searching for new ones or watching for openings. [2]
  • American Millennials are now more likely to say they will stay 5+ years with a company than to leave within 2 years. [2]
  • 50% of candidates say they wouldn’t work for a company with a bad reputation even for a pay increase. [2]
  • 92% would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. [2]
  • 69% of job seekers are likely to apply to a job if the employer actively manages its brand. [2]
  • 33% of American workers are engaged at work vs. 70% of workers at the world’s best organizations. [2]
  • 61% of employees say the realities of their new job differ from expectations set during the interview process. [2]
  • 80% of job seekers believe their companies foster diversity at work. [2]
  • Ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to have a financial performance above the industry mean. [2]
  • 41% of US employers plan to use text messages to schedule job interviews. [2]
  • By 2016, only 19% of recruiters were investing in a mobile career website. [2]
  • 78% of 2017 grads completed an internship or apprenticeship. [2]
  • 97% of 2017 grads said they will need onthe job training to further their careers. [2]
  • In 2020 it’s estimated that 35% of job openings required at least a bachelor’s degree, 30% of job openings required some college or an associate’s degree and 36% of job openings required no education beyond high school. [2]
  • 79% of employees who quit claimed this was a major reason for leaving. [2]
  • 81% of employees would consider leaving their jobs for the right offer. [2]
  • Up to 85% of jobs are filled via networking. [2]
  • Job Search Statistics Current unemployment rate in the U.S. is 6.7% with 10.7 million people looking for jobs. [2]
  • Long term unemployed in the U.S. make up 36.9% of the unemployed at 3.9 million. [2]
  • 59% of employees say they’ve been working with their current employer for more than three years. [2]
  • And 22% of older millennials between 30 and 37 have been with their current employer for more than 7 years. [2]
  • 89% of Glassdoor users are either actively looking for jobs or would consider better opportunities. [2]
  • 87% of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges, and 50% call the problem “very important.”. [2]
  • In 2014, 51% of workers had worked for their current employer for 5+ years compared to 46% in 1996. [2]
  • Only 12% of employees agree that their company does a good job of onboarding new employees. [2]
  • 33% of American workers are engaged at work vs. 70% of workers at the world’s best organizations. [2]
  • ○ Qualified 50% ○ Underqualified. [2]
  • The State of American Jobs Report Pew Research October 2016) 68% of employees believe they are overqualified for their current job. [2]
  • 44% of recent grads found it difficult or extremely difficult to find a job. [2]
  • Jobs requiring social skills have grown 83%. [2]
  • Jobs requiring analytical skills grew 77%. [2]
  • Jobs requiring both social and analytical skills have grown 94% since 1980. [2]
  • ○ Focus on Soft Skills Assessment 35% ○ Investment in Innovative Interviewing Tools 34% ○ Company Mission Used as a Differentiator. [2]
  • Big Data 29% 95% of recruiters say that hiring will remain as competitive in 2017 as it was in 2015 and 2016. [2]
  • 63% of recruiters say talent shortage is their biggest problem. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Not enough suitable candidates. [2]
  • ○ Difficulty finding passive talent. [2]
  • Too many unqualified junk resumes from job boards. [2]
  • Other. [2]
  • In 2016, 56% of recruiters said they can’t make good hires because of lengthy hiring procedures. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Three 51% ○ Four 22% ○ Two 17% ○ Five or More 9% ○ One. [2]
  • ○ Career Sites 27.35% ○ Job Boards. [2]
  • ○ Referrals 15.83% ○ Internal Hire. [2]
  • Agency. [2]
  • ○ Job Boards 52.17% ○ Career Sites 33.90% ○ Referrals 3.07% ○ Internal Hire 2.26% ○ Agency. [2]
  • 46% of employees hired through referral programs stay for three years or more, while only 14% of those hired through job boards stay. [2]
  • Referrals are hired 55% faster than those hired through a career site. [2]
  • To get quality referrals, 64% of recruiters report awarding monetary bonuses as incentive. [2]
  • Average conversion rate of career websites visitors to applicants 8.59% in 2016, down from 11% in 2015. [2]
  • The average conversion rate from interview to offer 19.78% in 2016 translating to 5 interviews per offer. [2]
  • The conversion rate of offers accepted 83.1% in 2016, down from 89% in 2015. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Accepted Another Offer. [2]
  • ○ Took Counteroffer 15% ○ Lengthy Hiring Process. [2]
  • No Rejection 5% ○ Limited Promotion or Career Pathing 2% ○ No Flexible Scheduling 2% ○ Inadequate or No Relocation Package. [2]
  • According to candidates ○ No Offer Was Rejected 40% ○ Compensation. [2]
  • ○ Accepted Another Offer 12% ○ Limited Promotion or Career Pathing 6% ○ No Flexible Scheduling. [2]
  • Too Long Ago to Remember. [2]
  • Inadequate or No Relocation Package. [2]
  • ○ Lengthy Hiring Process 0% . [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Three 45% ○ Two 20% ○ Four 17% ○ No Rejections 10% ○ One 4% ○ Five or More. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ 58 Weeks. [2]
  • 9+ Weeks. [2]
  • 76% of job seekers want to know how long it’s going to take to fill out an application before they start. [2]
  • 66% of job seekers said they would wait only two weeks for a callback after which they consider the job a lost cause and move on to other opportunities. [2]
  • The average cost of a bad hire is up to 30% of the earnings of the employee in the first year according to the Department of Labor. [2]
  • ○ Advancement Opportunities 72% ○ Better Compensation Packages 64% ○ Improved Worklife Balance 58% ○ Better Company Culture 37% ○ Fun Company Culture 11% ○ Collaborative Environment. [2]
  • ○ Access to Emerging Tech. [2]
  • ○ Other 7% ○ Training / Continued Education. [2]
  • ○ Sense of Camaraderie. [2]
  • According to candidates ○ Competitive Compensation Packages. [2]
  • Emphasis on Worklife Balance 38% ○ Advancement Opportunities. [2]
  • 31% ○ Collaborative Environment 29% ○ Training / Continued Education. [2]
  • The Organization’s Ethics 27% ○ Work From Home Options. [2]
  • ○ Ease of Commute. [2]
  • ○ Fun Company Culture. [2]
  • ○ Access to Emerging Tech. [2]
  • ○ Sense of Camaraderie 10% ○ Other. [2]
  • Other Insurance Coverage 82% ○ Retirement Plan 68% ○ Wellness Program. [2]
  • ○ Somewhat 37% ○ Not Very. [2]
  • Not At All 18% ○ Extremely. [2]
  • ○ Total Benefits Package. [2]
  • 40% ○ Work From Home Options. [2]
  • ○ Description of Work / Life Balance 35% ○ Photos / Videos of the Work Environment. [2]
  • ○ Descriptions of Team Structures and Hierarchies 27% ○ Number of People. [2]
  • 90% of job seekers say that it’s important to work for a company that embraces transparency. [2]
  • 76% want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work. [2]
  • 61% of job seekers say they would leave their job for health insurance. [2]
  • 92 percent would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. [2]
  • 53% of employees who get paid vacation would leave for more at another company. [2]
  • 50% of employees with retirement plans would leave for a better retirement plan. [2]
  • 48% of employees who get paid leave would leave for more paid leave. [2]
  • 35% of employees would change jobs for a flexible working location , only 12% of companies offer it. [2]
  • 40% of employees would change jobs for profit sharing, 20% say companies offer it. [2]
  • 51% of employees would change jobs for a retirement plan with a defined pension, 43% say companies offer it. [2]
  • 51% of employees would change jobs for flextime, 44% say their company offers it. [2]
  • ○ Entrylevel Employees between 30 50% of the annual salary to replace them. [2]
  • ○ Midlevel Employees upwards of 150% of their annual salary to replace them. [2]
  • ○ Highlevel or Highly Specialized Employees 400% of their annual salary. [2]
  • Impersonal Applications. [2]
  • Aren’t Customized and Tailored. [2]
  • Job Experience 67% ○ Cultural Fit. [2]
  • Cover Letters 26% ○ Prestige of College. [2]
  • ○ GPA. [2]
  • 62% of employers are specifically looking for your soft skills. [2]
  • 93% of employers consider soft skills an “essential” or “very important” factor in hiring decisions. [2]
  • 42% of job seekers say that expanding their skill set is a top priority when choosing an employer. [2]
  • Tailored to the Open Position 63% ○ Skill Sets Listed First on a Resume. [2]
  • ○ Application Addressed to the Hiring Manager. [2]
  • ○ Links to Personal Blogs, Portfolios, or Websites. [2]
  • 80.4% of resumes errors come from mistakes in former job experience descriptions. [2]
  • 71.6% of resume errors come from the miscommunication of skills on a resume. [2]
  • 68.7% of resume errors involved missing accomplishments. [2]
  • 75% employers caught a lie on a resume. [2]
  • The average conversion rate from interview to offer was 19.78% in 2016, translating to 5 interviews per offer. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Three 51% ○ Four 22% ○ Two 17% ○ 5 or More 9% ○ One. [2]
  • ○ 56 Weeks 35% ○ 34 Weeks 31% ○ 78 Weeks 23% ○ 12 Weeks. [2]
  • ○ 9+ Weeks. [2]
  • According to recruiters ○ Three 45% ○ Two 20% ○ Four 17% ○ No Rejections 10% ○ One 4% ○ 5 or More. [2]
  • 61% of employees say the realities of their new job differ from expectations set during the interview process. [2]
  • 41% of employers say that they might not interview a candidate if they can’t find them online. [2]
  • A 10% harder interview process is associated with 2.6% higher employee satisfaction later. [2]
  • 34% of recruiters list investment in innovative interviewing tools as a top trend for the near future. [2]
  • The most popular interview technique is structured interviews, used frequently by 74% of HR professionals. [2]
  • This is followed by behavioral interviews (73%), phone screening (57%), and panel interviews (48%). [2]
  • Read our reasearch on Top Qualities and Traits Employers Look for in 2023 Millennials Recruitment Statistics Millennials make up 38% of the American workforce, on track for up to 75% by 2025. [2]
  • 71% of Millennials say they’re not engaged or are actively disengaged at work. [2]
  • ○ Ability to Work from Home 38% ○ Career Pathing. [2]
  • ○ Company Perks 17% ○ Open Floor Plans 14% ○ Mobile over Desktop 13% ○ Internal Social Sharing Platforms 10% ○ Groups Devoted to Mentoring and Diversity 9% ○ Other. [2]
  • 60% of Millennials say they’re open to different job opportunities. [2]
  • Yet, American Millennials are now more likely to say they will stay 5+ years with a company than to leave within 2 years. [2]
  • In 2016, 64% of US Millennials planned on leaving their jobs in the next 5 years. [2]
  • Other Insurance Coverage 60% ○ Flexible Location 50% ○ Flexible Location. [2]
  • 45% ○ Paid Maternity Leave 44% ○ Paid to Work on Independent Project 42% ○ Professional Development Programs. [2]
  • Paid Paternity Leave. [2]
  • Child Care Reimbursement. [2]
  • 38% of Millennials worldwide plan on leaving their jobs within 2 years, down from 44% in 2016. [2]
  • 31% of Millennials worldwide plan on staying 5+ years in their job, up from 27% in 2016. [2]
  • 7% of Millennials worldwide say they will “leave soon,” down from 17% in 2016. [2]
  • According to Millennials ○ Market Reputation 40% ○ Goodwill/Community Outreach 16% ○ Employee Ambassadors 15% ○ Online Presence 12% ○ Quick Mobileapply Process 11% ○ Other. [2]
  • ○ Compensation and Benefits 28% ○ Mentorship. [2]
  • ○ Opportunities for Advancement 26% ○ Sense of Purpose from Work 16% ○ Worklife Balance 16% ○ Flexible Arrangements 5% ○ Fun Company Culture 3% ○ Teams. [2]
  • ○ Other 2% ○ Company Perks 1% ○ Cuttingedge Technology 1% 50% of Millennials say they’d consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less. [2]
  • 87% rate professional career growth and developmental opportunities as important to them in a job. [2]
  • 45% of Millennials rate professional career growth as “very important” to them as opposed to 31% of GenXers and 18% of Baby Boomers. [2]
  • 65% of Millennials prefer full time employment as it offers them “job security” and a “fixed income.”. [2]
  • Two thirds of Millennials have employers with flexible arrangements 69% with flexible working hours and 68% with flexible roles. [2]
  • 61% of Millennials believe GenZ will have a positive impact on the workplace. [2]
  • Child Care Reimbursement. [2]
  • Body odor turns off 56% of recruiters, while dressing “too casually” impacts hiring decisions for 62% of them. [2]
  • ○ Company Websites 77% ○ Referrals. [2]
  • ○ Suggestions from Friends or Family 68% ○ Online Job Sites 58% ○ Publications or Online Sources in a Field. [2]
  • General Web Search 55% ○ Professional Network Site 47% ○ Professional or Alumni Organization 41% ○ News Media. [2]
  • 79% of job seekers say they are likely to use social media in their job search. [2]
  • 18% of job seekers said they will check out hiring managers on social media platforms while job hunting. [2]
  • After finding a job offer, 64% of candidate said they research a company online and 37% said they will move on to another job offer if they can’t find information on the company. [2]
  • 50.5% of recruiters say social media has changed their recruiting results. [2]
  • 29% of recruiters are investing in recruiting via social media platforms. [2]
  • 60% of recruiters are investing in company career websites. [2]
  • 28% of recruiters are investing in recruiting via job boards. [2]
  • The top social media platforms recruiters use to check candidates include ○ LinkedIn. [2]
  • ○ Instagram 8% ○ Youtube. [2]
  • ○ Snapchat. [2]
  • 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to check candidates, but only 43% use Facebook and 22% Twitter. [2]
  • 67% of social job seekers use Facebook to search for jobs. [2]
  • 60% of recruiters use social networking sites to research candidates. [2]
  • 59% of recruiters use search engines to look up candidates. [2]
  • ○ Provocative or Inappropriate Content. [2]
  • Alcohol and Drugs 43% ○ Bigoted Content . [2]
  • 33% ○ Badmouthing Previous Company 31% ○ Poor Communcation Skills. [2]
  • Selfies. [2]
  • For recruiters over 65, 63% find evidence of alcohol consumption on social media as negative. [2]
  • Only 36% of recruiters will try to add candidates as friends on a private account. [2]
  • When asked, 68% of job seekers granted permission, which is down from 80%. [2]
  • 41% of employers say they research current employees on social media, with 32% using search engines. [2]
  • 63% of US employers expect employees to have social media experience. [2]
  • Employer Branding Statistics 51% of recruiters say that employee branding is the number one investment that they will increase in the next year. [2]
  • Employer branding has a significant impact on hiring talent according to 80% of recruiters. [2]
  • 46% of Glassdoor members read reviews before they speak with a company recruiter or hiring manager. [2]
  • 86% of Glassdoor users read company reviews and ratings before making a decision to apply for a job. [2]
  • 55% of jobseekers who have read a negative review have decided not to apply for a job at that company. [2]
  • 69% of job seekers are likely to apply to a job if the employer actively manages its brand. [2]
  • 62% of Glassdoor users agree that their perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review. [2]
  • Companies with bad reputations pay 10% more per hire. [2]
  • 50% of candidates say they wouldn’t work for a company with a bad reputation even for a pay increase. [2]
  • Only 8% of the recruiting budget is spent on employer branding. [2]
  • Given an unlimited budget, 53% of recruiters would invest in employer branding. [2]
  • Organizations that do invest in employer branding are 3x more likely to make a quality hire. [2]
  • Fewer than half (49%). [2]
  • My Company’s Career Site 61% ○ LinkedIn 55% ○ Thirdparty Website or Job Board. [2]
  • Campus Recruiting. [2]
  • African American 11.9% ○ Asian 6.1% ○ Hispanic or Latino. [2]
  • Women make up 47% of the overall workforce. [2]
  • Women make up 55% of workers holding jobs requiring social skills. [2]
  • Women make up 52% of workers holding jobs requiring analytical skills. [2]
  • Men make up 70% of workers holding jobs requiring physical or manual skills. [2]
  • 67% of active and passive job seekers say diversity is important to them when they’re evaluating companies and job offers. [2]
  • Here’s who thinks diversity is “very important” in the workplace ○ African Americans 60% ○ Hispanics 43% ○ Women 36% ○ Asian/Pacific Islanders 32% ○ Men 29% ○ Whites 27% . [2]
  • 32% of job seekers ranked diversity as “important,” and 18% as “not important.”. [2]
  • 37% of recruiters ranked recruiting more diverse candidates as a top trend in the near future. [2]
  • In 2015, American women working full time were paid 80% of what their male counterparts made on average, creating a pay gap of 20%. [2]
  • Women are 82% more likely to believe that men are paid more for the same work. [2]
  • Gender diverse companies are 15% more likely to have a financial performance above the industry mean. [2]
  • Women account for 19% of corporate board members in the US. [2]
  • There are 32 female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies up from 21 in 2016, but only accounting for 6.4% of the list. [2]
  • There are only 4 African American CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, accounting for 2% of the list. [2]
  • ○ White 73% ○ Asian 21% ○ Latino/a. [2]
  • Native American 0.2% ○ Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 0.1% Learn more from Zety’s studies on. [2]
  • In 2014, 48% of job seekers thought mobile devices would be the most common way to search for jobs by 2017. [2]
  • Only 10% of recruiters were investing in providing applications via mobile in 2016. [2]
  • In 2014, 45% of job seekers said they used their mobile devices to search for jobs at least once a day. [2]
  • Mobile job seekers reported searching for jobs in bed (52%), at their current job (37%), or in the restroom (15%). [2]
  • In 2014, 89% of job seekers believed a mobile device was an important tool for the job search. [2]
  • In 2016, 44% of new grads wanted to work for medium or small businesses and startups. [2]
  • In 2017, 19% of grads want to work for large companies, up 37% over 2016 grads. [2]
  • 69% of 2017 grads expect to make more than $35,000 a year, only 49% of recent grads make that much. [2]
  • 66% of 2017 grads believe they can make more than $35,000 a year at large companies vs. 44% at small companies. [2]
  • 81% of 2017 grads believe they can advance their careers in large companies, vs. 63% in small companies. [2]
  • 72% of 2017 grads believe they can get training at large companies vs. 57% at small companies. [2]
  • 29% of 2017 grads believe they will stay 5+ years at a large company vs. 9% at small companies. [2]
  • IT Positions 27% ○ Customer Service 26% ○ Finance 19% ○ Business Development 19% ○ Sales. [2]
  • ○ Business 35% ○ Computer and Information Sciences 23% ○ Engineering 18% ○ Math and Statistics 15% ○ Health Professionals and Related Clinical Sciences. [2]
  • 14% ○ Communications Technologies 11% ○ Engineering Technologies. [2]
  • ○ Communication and Journalism. [2]
  • ○ Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities 7% ○ Science Technologies 7% ○ Social Sciences 6% ○ Biological and Biomedical Sciences 6% ○ Architecture and Planning. [2]
  • ○ Education 5% 94% of 2017 grads expect to find a job in their field of study. [2]
  • Only 57% of recent grads work full time in their field of study. [2]
  • In 2016, 68% of new grads said they wanted onthe job learning and 67% got training from their first employer. [2]
  • Only 27% of college graduates are working in a job directly related to their major. [2]
  • Only 24% of employers feel that new graduates are not prepared for work at all. [2]
  • Book Learning Over Realworld Learning. [2]
  • No Blend of Technical and Liberal Arts Skills. [2]
  • Not Prepared for the Complexity of Entrylevel Roles. [2]
  • No Focus on Internships 13% ○ Are Uptodate with Technology Changes. [2]
  • Wrong Degree 11% 83% of 2017 grads believe their education prepared them for their career, but 84% still expect formal training. [2]
  • 54% of recent grads consider themselves underemployed, up from 51% in 2016 and 41% in 2013. [2]
  • Recent grads are 2.5x more likely to stay for 5+ years if they don’t feel underemployed and their skills are being used. [2]
  • ○ Relocating for the Job 75% (up from 72% in 2016). [2]
  • Weekends and Evening 58% (up from 52% in 2016). [2]
  • ○ Unpaid Internship in Place of Paid Opening. [2]
  • In 2016, 92% of new graduates said that it’s important that their company is socially responsible. [2]

I know you want to use Diversity Recruiting Software, thus we made this list of best Diversity Recruiting Software. We also wrote about how to learn Diversity Recruiting Software and how to install Diversity Recruiting Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Diversity Recruiting Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Diversity Recruiting statistics of 2023.

Reference


  1. instride – https://www.instride.com/insights/talent-acquisition-recruitment-statistics/.
  2. naceweb – https://www.naceweb.org/diversity-equity-and-inclusion/trends-and-predictions/current-trends-in-diversity-recruiting-practices/.
  3. zety – https://zety.com/blog/hr-statistics.
  4. oleeo – https://blog.oleeo.com/mind-blowing-diversity-recruitment-stats.
  5. builtin – https://builtin.com/diversity-inclusion/diversity-in-the-workplace-statistics.
  6. vervoe – https://vervoe.com/diversity-statistics/.
  7. fundera – https://www.fundera.com/resources/diversity-in-the-workplace-statistics.
  8. bonus – https://blog.bonus.ly/diversity-inclusion-statistics.
  9. business2community – https://www.business2community.com/human-resources/12-diversity-statistics-that-will-make-you-rethink-your-hiring-decisions-02322090.
  10. seekout – https://seekout.com/blog/diversity-recruiting/8-diversity-hiring-statistics-every-talent-strategist-needs-to-know/.
  11. clearcompany – https://blog.clearcompany.com/12-workplace-diversity-statistics.
  12. glassdoor – https://www.glassdoor.com/employers/blog/diversity/.
  13. apple – https://www.apple.com/diversity/.
  14. yello – https://yello.co/blog/diversity-in-the-workplace-statistics/.
  15. quantumworkplace – https://www.quantumworkplace.com/future-of-work/diversity-and-inclusion-statistics.
  16. naceweb – https://www.naceweb.org/diversity-equity-and-inclusion/trends-and-predictions/nearly-90-percent-of-employers-have-a-diversity-recruiting-strategy-for-class-of-2021/.

In Conclusion

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