Employee Referral Statistics 2022 - Everything You Need to Know


Are you looking to add Employee Referral to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Employee Referral statistics of 2022.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Employee Referral stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Employee Referral statistics. All are here only πŸ™‚

How much of an impact will Employee Referral have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Employee Referral? We will answer all your Employee Referral related questions here.

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Best Employee Referral Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 476 Employee Referral Statistics on this page πŸ™‚

Employee Referral Benefits Statistics

  • Surveys regarding the benefits of employee referral programs show that 88% of employers utilizing or implementing referral programs reported that recruited candidates were of better quality than other candidates. [0]
  • 60% of people report that benefits and perks are a major factor in considering whether to accept a job offer. [1]
  • 49% of recent grads accepted a lower salary or compromised on benefits. [2]

Employee Referral Market Statistics

  • Employers are recruiting just 10% of the time in the global market, and human resources statistics show that excellent candidates almost always have multiple offers, putting employers in competition. [0]
  • 36% of employees say a company’s market reputation is “very important” when considering a new job. [2]
  • 39% of women vs. 33% of men say market reputation is “very important” when considering a new job. [2]
  • 40% of Millennials say market reputation has the biggest influence on their impression of an employer. [2]
  • 59% agree that an organization’s thought leadership is a more trustworthy source for assessing a company’s capabilities than the company’s marketing material. [3]
  • Peertopeer marketing is the leading driver behind 20 50% of all purchasing decisions. [3]

Employee Referral Software Statistics

  • About 33% of companies use third party software systems like to manage their employee referral programs. [4]
  • Over 98% of fortune 500 companies use recruitment software. [1]
  • Use of social software by employees can improve productivity by 20. [3]

Employee Referral Latest Statistics

  • One study found that Over 45% of employees referred by colleagues stay for more than four years, while only 25% of employees sourced through job boards stay for longer than two years. [5]
  • Referrals were favored by 82% of employers for yielding the best return on investment. [5]
  • According to referral rates, 32% of workers recommend skilled labor to improve their organization. [5]
  • Employee referrals increase the likelihood of a job match by 2.6–6.6%. [5]
  • Only 25% of workers recruited through job boards stay for more than two years, whereas 45 percent of employees obtained through employee referrals stay for more than four years. [5]
  • You might easily pay the recruiting agency 2030% of yearly employee compensation, but a referral incentive just requires 2 3% of annual employee pay. [5]
  • Employee referrals were ranked first among all sourcing alternatives by 82 percent of employees. [5]
  • Employers rated employee referrals as the most reliable source for generating quality new hires with 88 percent. [5]
  • Employees are more likely to suggest potential jobs if they are rewarded, which is why over 70% of organizations provide monetary incentives ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 to employees who can refer appropriate prospects. [5]
  • Employees who refer a successful hire are offered alternatives to monetary rewards in 15% of companies. [5]
  • Referrals are most likely to result in a job at a company with less than 100 employees. [5]
  • Using referrals increases retention by 46% for employers. [5]
  • Employee referral bonuses are the most effective incentive for employers, according to 71% of employers. [5]
  • Generally, referral employees are more profitable for their employers by 25%. [5]
  • In the United States, referrals account for 30 to 50 percent of all new employees. [5]
  • In fact, a candidate who is invited for an interview has a 40% higher probability of being recruited than other prospective employees. [5]
  • Here is the list of the 8 most important employee referral statistics 82% of employersrated employee referrals above all other sources for generating the best return on investment. [6]
  • Referred candidates are55% faster to hire, compared with employees sourced through career sites. [6]
  • 88% of employers said that referrals are the #1 best source for above. [6]
  • After two years, retention of referred employees is 45% compared to 20% from job boards. [6]
  • Employees who were hired through referral programs produce 25% more profit for their companies than new hires hired via other sources. [6]
  • Referred candidates are more likely to accept your job offer by a statistically significant 2.6–6.6 percent. [6]
  • 69% of companies offer cash bonuses that fall between$1,000 β€”. [6]
  • Employee Referrals are 5x more likely to be hired. [7]
  • 82% of Employees rated Employee Referrals above all other sourcing options to yield the best ROI. [7]
  • 45% of employees sourced from employee referrals stay for longer than 4 years, and only 25% of employees sourced through job boards stay for over 2 years. [7]
  • 82% of employers placed referrals above other options for yielding a better return on investment. [8]
  • 45% of people employed through referrals stay with the company for more than four years. [8]
  • When it comes to getting new staff, hiring statistics show that 82% of companies have integrated referrals into their recruiting strategy because they believe this method yields the best results and the best ROI. [8]
  • Employers who use referrals have a 46% retention rate. [8]
  • Those who use the latter have a 33% retention rate. [8]
  • chances of getting matched increased by 2.6 to 6.6% because HR managers see referrals as a valuable recruiting tool. [8]
  • Traditional recruiting is often more expensive than referrals, and 55% of companies believe hiring through referrals drives costs down. [8]
  • According to human resources statistics, while it takes 39 to 55 days for candidates from job sites to get hired, referral applicants get started on the job within 29 days. [8]
  • About 41% of referrals received by companies come from external networks and contacts. [8]
  • Now, most staffing needs are fulfilled through recommendations, and nearly half (~40%). [8]
  • Around 27% of companies use this method alongside cash incentives. [8]
  • While 6% of employees participate in their company’s recruitment process because of the bonus they stand to get, others want their employer to see them as an integral part of the team, who is indispensable. [8]
  • However, referral recruiting statistics show that job seekers are 46% more likely to accept InMails if they have a personal relationship with a company’s staff. [8]
  • Employees are more motivated to refer potential hires if there are incentives, which is why almost 70% of companies offer between $1,000 and $5,000 in cash incentives for staff members who are able to refer qualified candidates. [4]
  • 15% of companies offer time off or additional vacation days as an alternative to cash incentives. [4]
  • 75% of companies prefer to use employee referral program systems that allow for automated or semi. [4]
  • They are 34 times more likely to be hired than non. [4]
  • 41% of referrals come from the organization’s external network. [4]
  • New hires sourced via referral programs produce 25% more profit for their companies than new hires sourced via other means. [4]
  • Consider these statistics Referrals are the leading source of superior candidates for 88% of employers. [9]
  • The top channels people use to look for new jobs are online job boards (60%), social professional networks (56%), and word of mouth (50%). [10]
  • [iCims] 35 % of employees refer to help their friends. [10]
  • 32% do it to help their company. [10]
  • 26% do it to be seen as a valuable colleague. [10]
  • Only 6% do it for money and recognition. [10]
  • [iCims] Larger companies tend to recruit more of their new hires from employee referrals than mid sized 24 percent] or smaller companies . [10]
  • [iCims] Almost 70% of companies offer between $1,000 and $5,000 in cash incentives for staff members who are able to refer qualified candidates. [10]
  • Candidates are 46% more likely to accept InMails when they’re connected to your employees. [10]
  • They are 34 times more likely to be hired than non. [10]
  • [CareerXroads] 41% of referrals come from the organization’s external network. [10]
  • Recruiters in 53 percent of bestin class organizations use social media networks for referrals, compared to only 37 percent of less successful organizations. [10]
  • [Aberdeen] 69 percent of large companies have a documented referral process, compared to 46 percent of smaller companies. [10]
  • The chances of a referred candidate getting fired decrease by an average of 350%. [10]
  • [Recruiter] New hires sourced via referral programs produce 25% more profit for their companies than new hires sourced via other means. [10]
  • [Alexander Group] 75% of companies prefer to use employee referral program systems that allow for automated or semi. [10]
  • [Zalp] 28% of organizations trying to fill a typical exempt position will offer a $1000 referral bonus. [10]
  • Employers who pay out employees in real time see an 83% uptick in engagement in their employee referral program. [10]
  • Almost 90% of individuals are susceptible to considering new job opportunities. [0]
  • Since only 2% of applications will even get a faceto face interview, promoting yourself in your network is still the best way to get hired. [0]
  • Hiring statistics indicate just 30% of workers are actively seeking work, making referral programs a more efficient way to access experienced and skilled workers who are already employed. [0]
  • In fact, according to recent data, referred applicants have a 20% chance of getting the job they competed for, compared to just 1.2% for those going through the regular application process. [0]
  • As a result, company owners are 3 4 times more likely to employ referred individuals. [0]
  • In comparison to hiring through job searching websites, employing through referrals is 55% faster. [0]
  • By taking advantage of such beneficial hiring practices, business owners will spare roughly around $3,000 per individual they employ according to the average cost per hire statistics. [0]
  • As such, an employee referral program survey shows that 82% of employers consider referral programs the top way of getting a high ROI rate. [0]
  • Referred hires bring an average of 25% more profit than employees that haven’t been referred. [0]
  • Statistics on employee referral programs suggest that referred candidates are 2.6% to 6.6% more likely to accept a job offer than other applicants. [0]
  • 40% of all candidates put forward via employee referrals are hired, yet just 7% of all applications an organisation will receive are employee referrals. [11]
  • Meaning almost half of an organisation’s hires are coming from only 7% of the applications they receive. [11]
  • On average, 47% of applicants hired from referrals stayed loyal to a company up for 3 years or more. [11]
  • Only 14% of applicants from job boards stayed the same length of time. [11]
  • 70% of employers say referred hires fit the company culture and values better than those from other sources of hire. [11]
  • 51% of employers say referred applicants are less expensive to recruit, while 67% said the recruiting process for referrals is shorter. [11]
  • Talent shortages in the United States have risen to historical levels with 69% of employers having difficulty filling jobs the highest in more than a decade. [1]
  • As many as 64% of employees may leave their jobs in 2020, according to newly released data in the Achievers 2020 Engagement and Retention Report. [1]
  • Achievers 89% of employers think employees leave for more money but in reality, only 12% do. [1]
  • Top reasons employees are looking or would consider leaving their company were β€œcompensation” (52%), β€œcareer advancement” (43%), and β€œlack of recognition” (19%). [1]
  • Healthcare insurance 40% 2. [1]
  • 401plan, retirement plan and/or pension 31% 6. [1]
  • Flexible schedule 30% 7. [1]
  • Office perks 19% Source Glassdoor Employment Confidence Survey πŸ’‘ Actionable takeaway Perks such as table tennis and beer taps in the office probably won’t help you attract top candidates. [1]
  • 75% of candidates will research a company’s reputation before applying for a job opening. [1]
  • 75% of Americans would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed. [1]
  • 92% of people would consider changing jobs if offered a role with a company with an excellent corporate reputation. [1]
  • A strong employer brand reduces turnover by 28% and cost per hire by 50%. [1]
  • Companies with strong employer brand see 50% more qualified applicants and take 1 2x faster to hire. [1]
  • 51% of respondents would be more attracted to a company that had job postings with visual elements than to a company that didn’t. [1]
  • Job listings which include a salary range got 75% more clicks than job listings that don’t. [1]
  • 52% of candidates don’t receive any communication in the two to three months after applying. [1]
  • An overwhelming 81% of candidates that the one main thing that would greatly improve their overall candidate experience is employers continuously communicating status updates to them. [1]
  • CareerBuilder survey 90% of recruiting emails. [1]
  • Job applicants who do not receive a job offer are 80% more likely to apply again if they already had a positive candidate experience. [1]
  • IBM Smarter Workforce Institute 63% of job seekers will likely reject a job offer because of a bad candidate experience. [1]
  • Software Advice 72% of job seekers that had a bad experience told others about it, either online or in. [1]
  • CareerArc 64% of job seekers say that a poor candidate experience would make them less likely to purchase goods and services from that employer. [1]
  • 73% of millennials found their last position through a social media site. [1]
  • Nearly half of all professionals (49%). [1]
  • LinkedIn 62% of job seekers use social media channels to evaluate employer brand of a company. [1]
  • 59% of candidates visit the company website after discovering a job. [1]
  • LinkedIn 60% of job seekers quit in the middle of filling out online job applications because of their length or complexity. [1]
  • 48% of businesses say that their top channel for quality hires are employee referrals. [1]
  • Referred candidates are 55% faster to hire. [1]
  • Referred hires produce 25% more profit than hires from other sources Source. [1]
  • The Alexander Group πŸ’‘ Actionable takeaway If you’re not getting at least 30% of hires through your employee referral program, you’re missing out on a great opportunity!. [1]
  • 82% of companies use some form of pre. [1]
  • A β€œwork sample” evaluation is the most effective assessment method, explaining up to 29% of an employee’s performance. [1]
  • In 2020, 82% of companies use some form of pre employment assessment tests. [1]
  • Structured interviews are being used by 74% of HR professionals around the world. [1]
  • LinkedIn 83% of talent say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once liked. [1]
  • 67% of recruiters consider culture fit to be an important factor when hiring. [1]
  • Totaljobs 90% of recruiters have rejected candidates due to their lack of cultural fit. [1]
  • 70% of professionals in the U.S. today would not work at a leading company if it meant they had to tolerate a bad workplace culture. [1]
  • LinkedIn 25% of candidates said that a better company culture is among their top reasons for changing jobs. [1]
  • According to these statistics, company culture is the key for attracting and retaining great employees in 2020. [1]
  • 67% of job seekers said a diverse workforce is important when considering job offers. [1]
  • Glassdoor 78% of talent professionals and hiring managers say that diversity is the top trend impacting how they hire. [1]
  • Nearly three in four employers (74%). [1]
  • Okay, so you are most likely to make a bad hire in 2020 same as any other employer. [1]
  • Only 12% of employees would strongly agree their organization does a great job of onboarding new employees Source Gallup State of the American Workplace 32% of global executives rate the onboarding they experienced as poor. [1]
  • Companies lose 25% of all new employees within a year. [1]
  • Allied Workforce Mobility Survey 69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they experienced great onboarding. [1]
  • Organizations with a standard onboarding process experience 50% greater new. [1]
  • Jobscan’s research 78% of employers say that using an ATS said that recruitment technology makes finding great talent easier than ever. [1]
  • Career Builder 68% of recruiting professionals say that the best way to improve recruiting performance over the next 5 years is by investing in new recruiting technology. [1]
  • Indeed delivered 72 percent of interviews and 65 percent of external source of hires in 2016. [12]
  • Roy Maurer Employee referrals continue to be employers’ top source of hires, delivering more than 30 percent of all hires overall in 2016 and 45 percent of internal hires, recently released data show. [12]
  • After referrals, internal moves and recruiter sourced hires make up most of the remainder of internal sources of hire. [12]
  • When internal and external hires were combined, Indeed nearly overtook referrals at just under 30 percent. [12]
  • Internal sources ultimately produced 52 percent of hires in 2016, compared to 48 percent from external sources, according to the report. [12]
  • Online sources produced 86 percent of interviews and 72 percent of hires in 2016. [12]
  • Here is the list of the 8 most important employee referral statistics 82% of employersrated employee referrals above all other sources for generating the best return on investment. [13]
  • Referred candidates are55% faster to hire, compared with employees sourced through career sites. [13]
  • 88% of employers said that referrals are the #1 best source for above. [13]
  • After two years, retention of referred employees is 45% compared to 20% from job boards. [13]
  • Employees who were hired through referral programs produce 25% more profit for their companies than new hires hired via other sources. [13]
  • Referred candidates are more likely to accept your job offer by a statistically significant 2.6. [13]
  • 69% of companies offer cash bonuses that fall between$1,000 – $5,000. [13]
  • U1 is limited to people unemployed for 15 weeks or longer and is expressed as a percentage of the civilian labor force U 1 is calculated as. [14]
  • x 100 U2 is limited to unemployed job losers , including people who completed temporary jobs, and is expressed as a percentage of the civilian labor force U 2 is calculated as. [14]
  • It is the total number of unemployed people, expressed as a percentage of the civilian labor force U 3 is calculated as. [14]
  • 100 discouraged workers to the total number of unemployed people, and is expressed as a percentage of the civilian labor force plus discouraged workers. [14]
  • Because of this overlap, data for the race and Hispanic ethnicity groups will not sum to the total. [14]
  • These three groups will not sum to the total because the total includes smaller race groups not shown separately American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and Two or More Races. [14]
  • When looking at earnings distributions by decile, this means that 10 percent of workers will earn less than the first decile amount; 20 percent will earn less than the second decile amount, and so forth. [14]
  • The ninth decile value divides the lowest earning 90 percent of workers from the highest earning 10 percent of workers. [14]
  • When looking at earnings distributions by quartile, this means that onefourth of workers will earn less than the first quartile amount, and three fourths of workers will earn less than the third quartile. [14]
  • Employee referrals have the highest applicationto hire conversion rate having only 7% application but constitutes 40% of all hires. [15]
  • According to Employee Referral Statistics, Employee referrals were ranked first among all sourcing options by 82 percent of employees. [15]
  • Only 25% of employees recruited through job boards stay for more than two years, while 45 percent of employees obtained through employee referrals remain for more than four years. [15]
  • According to studies, 60% of employees would be eager to join a referral program. [15]
  • Because their company does not actively promote the program, just 23% participate. [15]
  • 1 GREAT EMPLOYEE ONBOARDING CAN IMPROVE EMPLOYEE RETENTION BY 82%. [16]
  • Research by Brandon Hall Group found that organizations with a strong onboarding process improve new hire retention by 82 percent and productivity by over 70 percent. [16]
  • 2 88% of organizations ‍don’t onboard. [16]
  • well Gallup found that only 12% of employees strongly agree their organization does a great job of onboarding new employees. [16]
  • That means 88% don’t believe their organizations do a great job of onboarding, and that leaves a lot of room for improvement!. [16]
  • 3 58% of organizations say their onboarding program is focused on processes and paperwork. [16]
  • It’s no surprise that only 12 percent of employees think their organization does a great job onboarding, when HCI found that more than half of organizations focus their employee onboarding on processes and paperwork. [16]
  • 4 1 in 5 new hires are unlikely to recommend an employer. [16]
  • That’s why it’s a shame that 20 percent of new hires are unlikely to recommend an employer to a friend or family member. [16]
  • However, a new team member’s willingness to refer increases 93 percent when they get multiple options to communicate goals, meet team members, and get questions answered prior to their start date. [16]
  • When they complete employee pre boarding online prior to their start date, their willingness to refer increases 83 percent. [16]
  • And when they get a call from the hiring manager prior to their first day, their willingness to refer also increases 83 percent. [16]
  • 6 New team member productivity hovers around 25% during the first 30 days A week long onboarding program is a common practice at many organizations, but a week is hardly enough time for a new hire to become acclimated to their company, culture, and role. [16]
  • In fact, only 29 percent of new hires say they feel fully prepared and supported to excel in their role after their onboarding experience. [16]
  • Data suggests that new hires have a 25 percent productivity rate in their first month on the job after completing new employee training. [16]
  • That number then increases to 50 percent in their second month of work and 75 percent in their third month on the job. [16]
  • Employees who strongly agree they have a clear plan for their professional development are 3.5 times more likely to strongly agree that their onboarding process was exceptional. [16]
  • Soliciting new hire feedback improves your relationship by 91%. [16]
  • 26 percent of new employees recall being asked for feedback on their candidate journey and the hiring process before their start date. [16]
  • But when employers ask for feedback, new hires are 91 percent more willing to increase their relationship out of the gate. [16]
  • New team members who were asked to provide feedback prior to their start date also had a 79 percent increase in willingness to refer others. [16]
  • 9 70% of team members who had exceptional onboarding experiences say they have “the best possible job” Employees who say they had exceptional onboarding experiences are 2.6 times more likely to be extremely satisfied with their workplace. [16]
  • In fact, 70 percent of those with exceptional onboarding experiences say they have “the best possible job.”. [16]
  • Investing more in communication and engagement during the pre boarding process can improve the onboarding experience by 83 percent. [16]
  • And a quick call from the hiring manager can increase a candidate’s great experience and willingness to increase their relationship with the employer by 68 percent. [16]
  • When the manager takes an active role in onboarding, team members are 3.4 times as likely to feel like their onboarding process was successful. [16]
  • 10 83% of employers use an employee onboarding solution to help manage and execute their processes consists of 54 activities. [16]
  • That’s perhaps why onboarding systems continue to be a top 10 technology investment, with 83 percent of employers saying they have one currently in place. [16]
  • 96% of job seekers say that it’s important to work for a company that embraces transparency. [2]
  • 79% of job seekers say they are likely to use social media in their job search and this increases to 86% for younger job seekers. [2]
  • 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to check candidates. [2]
  • After finding a job opening, 64% of candidates said they research a company online and 37% said they will move on to another job opening if they can’t find information on the company. [2]
  • 91% of employers prefer their candidates to have work experience, and 65% of them prefer their candidates to have relevant work experience. [2]
  • 87% of Millennials rate professional career growth and developmental opportunities as important to them in a job. [2]
  • Nearly 80% of Millennials look for people and culture fit with employers, followed by career potential. [2]
  • In 2015, 51% of those who did have jobs were searching for new ones or watching for openings. [2]
  • American Millennials are now more likely to say they will stay 5+ years with a company than to leave within 2 years. [2]
  • 50% of candidates say they wouldn’t work for a company with a bad reputation even for a pay increase. [2]
  • 92% would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. [2]
  • 69% of job seekers are likely to apply to a job if the employer actively manages its brand. [2]
  • 33% of American workers are engaged at work vs. 70% of workers at the world’s best organizations. [2]
  • 61% of employees say the realities of their new job differ from expectations set during the interview process. [2]
  • 80% of job seekers believe their companies foster diversity at work. [2]
  • Ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to have a financial performance above the industry mean. [2]
  • 41% of US employers plan to use text messages to schedule job interviews. [2]
  • By 2016, only 19% of recruiters were investing in a mobile career website. [2]
  • 78% of 2017 grads completed an internship or apprenticeship. [2]
  • 97% of 2017 grads said they will need onthe job training to further their careers. [2]
  • In 2020 it’s estimated that 35% of job openings required at least a bachelor’s degree, 30% of job openings required some college or an associate’s degree and 36% of job openings required no education beyond high school. [2]
  • 79% of employees who quit claimed this was a major reason for leaving. [2]
  • 81% of employees would consider leaving their jobs for the right offer. [2]
  • Up to 85% of jobs are filled via networking. [2]
  • Job Search Statistics Current unemployment rate in the U.S. is 6.7% with 10.7 million people looking for jobs. [2]
  • Long term unemployed in the U.S. make up 36.9% of the unemployed at 3.9 million. [2]
  • 59% of employees say they’ve been working with their current employer for more than three years. [2]
  • And 22% of older millennials between 30 and 37 have been with their current employer for more than 7 years. [2]
  • 89% of Glassdoor users are either actively looking for jobs or would consider better opportunities. [2]
  • 87% of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges, and 50% call the problem “very important.”. [2]
  • In 2014, 51% of workers had worked for their current employer for 5+ years compared to 46% in 1996. [2]
  • Only 12% of employees agree that their company does a good job of onboarding new employees. [2]
  • 33% of American workers are engaged at work vs. 70% of workers at the world’s best organizations. [2]
  • β—‹ Qualified 50% β—‹ Underqualified. [2]
  • The State of American Jobs Report Pew Research October 2016) 68% of employees believe they are overqualified for their current job. [2]
  • 44% of recent grads found it difficult or extremely difficult to find a job. [2]
  • Jobs requiring social skills have grown 83%. [2]
  • Jobs requiring analytical skills grew 77%. [2]
  • Jobs requiring both social and analytical skills have grown 94% since 1980. [2]
  • β—‹ Focus on Soft Skills Assessment 35% β—‹ Investment in Innovative Interviewing Tools 34% β—‹ Company Mission Used as a Differentiator. [2]
  • Big Data 29% 95% of recruiters say that hiring will remain as competitive in 2017 as it was in 2015 and 2016. [2]
  • 63% of recruiters say talent shortage is their biggest problem. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Not enough suitable candidates. [2]
  • β—‹ Difficulty finding passive talent. [2]
  • Too many unqualified junk resumes from job boards. [2]
  • Other. [2]
  • In 2016, 56% of recruiters said they can’t make good hires because of lengthy hiring procedures. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Three 51% β—‹ Four 22% β—‹ Two 17% β—‹ Five or More 9% β—‹ One. [2]
  • β—‹ Career Sites 27.35% β—‹ Job Boards. [2]
  • β—‹ Referrals 15.83% β—‹ Internal Hire. [2]
  • Agency. [2]
  • β—‹ Job Boards 52.17% β—‹ Career Sites 33.90% β—‹ Referrals 3.07% β—‹ Internal Hire 2.26% β—‹ Agency. [2]
  • 46% of employees hired through referral programs stay for three years or more, while only 14% of those hired through job boards stay. [2]
  • Referrals are hired 55% faster than those hired through a career site. [2]
  • To get quality referrals, 64% of recruiters report awarding monetary bonuses as incentive. [2]
  • Average conversion rate of career websites visitors to applicants 8.59% in 2016, down from 11% in 2015. [2]
  • The average conversion rate from interview to offer 19.78% in 2016 translating to 5 interviews per offer. [2]
  • The conversion rate of offers accepted 83.1% in 2016, down from 89% in 2015. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Accepted Another Offer. [2]
  • β—‹ Took Counteroffer 15% β—‹ Lengthy Hiring Process. [2]
  • No Rejection 5% β—‹ Limited Promotion or Career Pathing 2% β—‹ No Flexible Scheduling 2% β—‹ Inadequate or No Relocation Package. [2]
  • According to candidates β—‹ No Offer Was Rejected 40% β—‹ Compensation. [2]
  • β—‹ Accepted Another Offer 12% β—‹ Limited Promotion or Career Pathing 6% β—‹ No Flexible Scheduling. [2]
  • Too Long Ago to Remember. [2]
  • Inadequate or No Relocation Package. [2]
  • β—‹ Lengthy Hiring Process 0% . [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Three 45% β—‹ Two 20% β—‹ Four 17% β—‹ No Rejections 10% β—‹ One 4% β—‹ Five or More. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ 58 Weeks. [2]
  • 9+ Weeks. [2]
  • 76% of job seekers want to know how long it’s going to take to fill out an application before they start. [2]
  • 66% of job seekers said they would wait only two weeks for a callback after which they consider the job a lost cause and move on to other opportunities. [2]
  • The average cost of a bad hire is up to 30% of the earnings of the employee in the first year according to the Department of Labor. [2]
  • β—‹ Advancement Opportunities 72% β—‹ Better Compensation Packages 64% β—‹ Improved Worklife Balance 58% β—‹ Better Company Culture 37% β—‹ Fun Company Culture 11% β—‹ Collaborative Environment. [2]
  • β—‹ Access to Emerging Tech. [2]
  • β—‹ Other 7% β—‹ Training / Continued Education. [2]
  • β—‹ Sense of Camaraderie. [2]
  • According to candidates β—‹ Competitive Compensation Packages. [2]
  • Emphasis on Worklife Balance 38% β—‹ Advancement Opportunities. [2]
  • 31% β—‹ Collaborative Environment 29% β—‹ Training / Continued Education. [2]
  • The Organization’s Ethics 27% β—‹ Work From Home Options. [2]
  • β—‹ Ease of Commute. [2]
  • β—‹ Fun Company Culture. [2]
  • β—‹ Access to Emerging Tech. [2]
  • β—‹ Sense of Camaraderie 10% β—‹ Other. [2]
  • Other Insurance Coverage 82% β—‹ Retirement Plan 68% β—‹ Wellness Program. [2]
  • β—‹ Somewhat 37% β—‹ Not Very. [2]
  • Not At All 18% β—‹ Extremely. [2]
  • β—‹ Total Benefits Package. [2]
  • 40% β—‹ Work From Home Options. [2]
  • β—‹ Description of Work / Life Balance 35% β—‹ Photos / Videos of the Work Environment. [2]
  • β—‹ Descriptions of Team Structures and Hierarchies 27% β—‹ Number of People. [2]
  • 90% of job seekers say that it’s important to work for a company that embraces transparency. [2]
  • 76% want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work. [2]
  • 61% of job seekers say they would leave their job for health insurance. [2]
  • 92 percent would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. [2]
  • 53% of employees who get paid vacation would leave for more at another company. [2]
  • 50% of employees with retirement plans would leave for a better retirement plan. [2]
  • 48% of employees who get paid leave would leave for more paid leave. [2]
  • 35% of employees would change jobs for a flexible working location , only 12% of companies offer it. [2]
  • 40% of employees would change jobs for profit sharing, 20% say companies offer it. [2]
  • 51% of employees would change jobs for a retirement plan with a defined pension, 43% say companies offer it. [2]
  • 51% of employees would change jobs for flextime, 44% say their company offers it. [2]
  • β—‹ Entrylevel Employees between 30 50% of the annual salary to replace them. [2]
  • β—‹ Midlevel Employees upwards of 150% of their annual salary to replace them. [2]
  • β—‹ Highlevel or Highly Specialized Employees 400% of their annual salary. [2]
  • Impersonal Applications. [2]
  • Aren’t Customized and Tailored. [2]
  • Job Experience 67% β—‹ Cultural Fit. [2]
  • Cover Letters 26% β—‹ Prestige of College. [2]
  • β—‹ GPA. [2]
  • 62% of employers are specifically looking for your soft skills. [2]
  • 93% of employers consider soft skills an β€œessential” or β€œvery important” factor in hiring decisions. [2]
  • 42% of job seekers say that expanding their skill set is a top priority when choosing an employer. [2]
  • Tailored to the Open Position 63% β—‹ Skill Sets Listed First on a Resume. [2]
  • β—‹ Application Addressed to the Hiring Manager. [2]
  • β—‹ Links to Personal Blogs, Portfolios, or Websites. [2]
  • 80.4% of resumes errors come from mistakes in former job experience descriptions. [2]
  • 71.6% of resume errors come from the miscommunication of skills on a resume. [2]
  • 68.7% of resume errors involved missing accomplishments. [2]
  • 75% employers caught a lie on a resume. [2]
  • The average conversion rate from interview to offer was 19.78% in 2016, translating to 5 interviews per offer. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Three 51% β—‹ Four 22% β—‹ Two 17% β—‹ 5 or More 9% β—‹ One. [2]
  • β—‹ 56 Weeks 35% β—‹ 34 Weeks 31% β—‹ 78 Weeks 23% β—‹ 12 Weeks. [2]
  • β—‹ 9+ Weeks. [2]
  • According to recruiters β—‹ Three 45% β—‹ Two 20% β—‹ Four 17% β—‹ No Rejections 10% β—‹ One 4% β—‹ 5 or More. [2]
  • 61% of employees say the realities of their new job differ from expectations set during the interview process. [2]
  • 41% of employers say that they might not interview a candidate if they can’t find them online. [2]
  • A 10% harder interview process is associated with 2.6% higher employee satisfaction later. [2]
  • 34% of recruiters list investment in innovative interviewing tools as a top trend for the near future. [2]
  • The most popular interview technique is structured interviews, used frequently by 74% of HR professionals. [2]
  • This is followed by behavioral interviews (73%), phone screening (57%), and panel interviews (48%). [2]
  • Read our reasearch on Top Qualities and Traits Employers Look for in 2022 Millennials Recruitment Statistics Millennials make up 38% of the American workforce, on track for up to 75% by 2025. [2]
  • 71% of Millennials say they’re not engaged or are actively disengaged at work. [2]
  • β—‹ Ability to Work from Home 38% β—‹ Career Pathing. [2]
  • β—‹ Company Perks 17% β—‹ Open Floor Plans 14% β—‹ Mobile over Desktop 13% β—‹ Internal Social Sharing Platforms 10% β—‹ Groups Devoted to Mentoring and Diversity 9% β—‹ Other. [2]
  • 60% of Millennials say they’re open to different job opportunities. [2]
  • Yet, American Millennials are now more likely to say they will stay 5+ years with a company than to leave within 2 years. [2]
  • In 2016, 64% of US Millennials planned on leaving their jobs in the next 5 years. [2]
  • Other Insurance Coverage 60% β—‹ Flexible Location 50% β—‹ Flexible Location. [2]
  • 45% β—‹ Paid Maternity Leave 44% β—‹ Paid to Work on Independent Project 42% β—‹ Professional Development Programs. [2]
  • Paid Paternity Leave. [2]
  • Child Care Reimbursement. [2]
  • 38% of Millennials worldwide plan on leaving their jobs within 2 years, down from 44% in 2016. [2]
  • 31% of Millennials worldwide plan on staying 5+ years in their job, up from 27% in 2016. [2]
  • 7% of Millennials worldwide say they will “leave soon,” down from 17% in 2016. [2]
  • According to Millennials β—‹ Market Reputation 40% β—‹ Goodwill/Community Outreach 16% β—‹ Employee Ambassadors 15% β—‹ Online Presence 12% β—‹ Quick Mobileapply Process 11% β—‹ Other. [2]
  • β—‹ Compensation and Benefits 28% β—‹ Mentorship. [2]
  • β—‹ Opportunities for Advancement 26% β—‹ Sense of Purpose from Work 16% β—‹ Worklife Balance 16% β—‹ Flexible Arrangements 5% β—‹ Fun Company Culture 3% β—‹ Teams. [2]
  • β—‹ Other 2% β—‹ Company Perks 1% β—‹ Cuttingedge Technology 1% 50% of Millennials say they’d consider taking a job with a different company for a raise of 20% or less. [2]
  • 87% rate professional career growth and developmental opportunities as important to them in a job. [2]
  • 45% of Millennials rate professional career growth as “very important” to them as opposed to 31% of GenXers and 18% of Baby Boomers. [2]
  • 65% of Millennials prefer full time employment as it offers them “job security” and a “fixed income.”. [2]
  • Two thirds of Millennials have employers with flexible arrangements 69% with flexible working hours and 68% with flexible roles. [2]
  • 61% of Millennials believe GenZ will have a positive impact on the workplace. [2]
  • Child Care Reimbursement. [2]
  • Body odor turns off 56% of recruiters, while dressing β€œtoo casually” impacts hiring decisions for 62% of them. [2]
  • β—‹ Company Websites 77% β—‹ Referrals. [2]
  • β—‹ Suggestions from Friends or Family 68% β—‹ Online Job Sites 58% β—‹ Publications or Online Sources in a Field. [2]
  • General Web Search 55% β—‹ Professional Network Site 47% β—‹ Professional or Alumni Organization 41% β—‹ News Media. [2]
  • 79% of job seekers say they are likely to use social media in their job search. [2]
  • 18% of job seekers said they will check out hiring managers on social media platforms while job hunting. [2]
  • After finding a job offer, 64% of candidate said they research a company online and 37% said they will move on to another job offer if they can’t find information on the company. [2]
  • 50.5% of recruiters say social media has changed their recruiting results. [2]
  • 29% of recruiters are investing in recruiting via social media platforms. [2]
  • 60% of recruiters are investing in company career websites. [2]
  • 28% of recruiters are investing in recruiting via job boards. [2]
  • The top social media platforms recruiters use to check candidates include β—‹ LinkedIn. [2]
  • β—‹ Instagram 8% β—‹ Youtube. [2]
  • β—‹ Snapchat. [2]
  • 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to check candidates, but only 43% use Facebook and 22% Twitter. [2]
  • 67% of social job seekers use Facebook to search for jobs. [2]
  • 60% of recruiters use social networking sites to research candidates. [2]
  • 59% of recruiters use search engines to look up candidates. [2]
  • β—‹ Provocative or Inappropriate Content. [2]
  • Alcohol and Drugs 43% β—‹ Bigoted Content . [2]
  • 33% β—‹ Badmouthing Previous Company 31% β—‹ Poor Communcation Skills. [2]
  • Selfies. [2]
  • For recruiters over 65, 63% find evidence of alcohol consumption on social media as negative. [2]
  • Only 36% of recruiters will try to add candidates as friends on a private account. [2]
  • When asked, 68% of job seekers granted permission, which is down from 80%. [2]
  • 41% of employers say they research current employees on social media, with 32% using search engines. [2]
  • 63% of US employers expect employees to have social media experience. [2]
  • Employer Branding Statistics 51% of recruiters say that employee branding is the number one investment that they will increase in the next year. [2]
  • Employer branding has a significant impact on hiring talent according to 80% of recruiters. [2]
  • 46% of Glassdoor members read reviews before they speak with a company recruiter or hiring manager. [2]
  • 86% of Glassdoor users read company reviews and ratings before making a decision to apply for a job. [2]
  • 55% of jobseekers who have read a negative review have decided not to apply for a job at that company. [2]
  • 69% of job seekers are likely to apply to a job if the employer actively manages its brand. [2]
  • 62% of Glassdoor users agree that their perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review. [2]
  • Companies with bad reputations pay 10% more per hire. [2]
  • 50% of candidates say they wouldn’t work for a company with a bad reputation even for a pay increase. [2]
  • Only 8% of the recruiting budget is spent on employer branding. [2]
  • Given an unlimited budget, 53% of recruiters would invest in employer branding. [2]
  • Organizations that do invest in employer branding are 3x more likely to make a quality hire. [2]
  • Fewer than half (49%). [2]
  • My Company’s Career Site 61% β—‹ LinkedIn 55% β—‹ Thirdparty Website or Job Board. [2]
  • Campus Recruiting. [2]
  • African American 11.9% β—‹ Asian 6.1% β—‹ Hispanic or Latino. [2]
  • Women make up 47% of the overall workforce. [2]
  • Women make up 55% of workers holding jobs requiring social skills. [2]
  • Women make up 52% of workers holding jobs requiring analytical skills. [2]
  • Men make up 70% of workers holding jobs requiring physical or manual skills. [2]
  • 67% of active and passive job seekers say diversity is important to them when they’re evaluating companies and job offers. [2]
  • Here’s who thinks diversity is “very important” in the workplace β—‹ African Americans 60% β—‹ Hispanics 43% β—‹ Women 36% β—‹ Asian/Pacific Islanders 32% β—‹ Men 29% β—‹ Whites 27% . [2]
  • 32% of job seekers ranked diversity as “important,” and 18% as “not important.”. [2]
  • 37% of recruiters ranked recruiting more diverse candidates as a top trend in the near future. [2]
  • In 2015, American women working full time were paid 80% of what their male counterparts made on average, creating a pay gap of 20%. [2]
  • Women are 82% more likely to believe that men are paid more for the same work. [2]
  • Gender diverse companies are 15% more likely to have a financial performance above the industry mean. [2]
  • Women account for 19% of corporate board members in the US. [2]
  • There are 32 female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies up from 21 in 2016, but only accounting for 6.4% of the list. [2]
  • There are only 4 African American CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, accounting for 2% of the list. [2]
  • β—‹ White 73% β—‹ Asian 21% β—‹ Latino/a. [2]
  • Native American 0.2% β—‹ Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 0.1% Learn more from Zety’s studies on. [2]
  • In 2014, 48% of job seekers thought mobile devices would be the most common way to search for jobs by 2017. [2]
  • Only 10% of recruiters were investing in providing applications via mobile in 2016. [2]
  • In 2014, 45% of job seekers said they used their mobile devices to search for jobs at least once a day. [2]
  • Mobile job seekers reported searching for jobs in bed (52%), at their current job (37%), or in the restroom (15%). [2]
  • In 2014, 89% of job seekers believed a mobile device was an important tool for the job search. [2]
  • In 2016, 44% of new grads wanted to work for medium or small businesses and startups. [2]
  • In 2017, 19% of grads want to work for large companies, up 37% over 2016 grads. [2]
  • 69% of 2017 grads expect to make more than $35,000 a year, only 49% of recent grads make that much. [2]
  • 66% of 2017 grads believe they can make more than $35,000 a year at large companies vs. 44% at small companies. [2]
  • 81% of 2017 grads believe they can advance their careers in large companies, vs. 63% in small companies. [2]
  • 72% of 2017 grads believe they can get training at large companies vs. 57% at small companies. [2]
  • 29% of 2017 grads believe they will stay 5+ years at a large company vs. 9% at small companies. [2]
  • IT Positions 27% β—‹ Customer Service 26% β—‹ Finance 19% β—‹ Business Development 19% β—‹ Sales. [2]
  • β—‹ Business 35% β—‹ Computer and Information Sciences 23% β—‹ Engineering 18% β—‹ Math and Statistics 15% β—‹ Health Professionals and Related Clinical Sciences. [2]
  • 14% β—‹ Communications Technologies 11% β—‹ Engineering Technologies. [2]
  • β—‹ Communication and Journalism. [2]
  • β—‹ Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities 7% β—‹ Science Technologies 7% β—‹ Social Sciences 6% β—‹ Biological and Biomedical Sciences 6% β—‹ Architecture and Planning. [2]
  • β—‹ Education 5% 94% of 2017 grads expect to find a job in their field of study. [2]
  • Only 57% of recent grads work full time in their field of study. [2]
  • In 2016, 68% of new grads said they wanted onthe job learning and 67% got training from their first employer. [2]
  • Only 27% of college graduates are working in a job directly related to their major. [2]
  • Only 24% of employers feel that new graduates are not prepared for work at all. [2]
  • Book Learning Over Realworld Learning. [2]
  • No Blend of Technical and Liberal Arts Skills. [2]
  • Not Prepared for the Complexity of Entrylevel Roles. [2]
  • No Focus on Internships 13% β—‹ Are Uptodate with Technology Changes. [2]
  • Wrong Degree 11% 83% of 2017 grads believe their education prepared them for their career, but 84% still expect formal training. [2]
  • 54% of recent grads consider themselves underemployed, up from 51% in 2016 and 41% in 2013. [2]
  • Recent grads are 2.5x more likely to stay for 5+ years if they don’t feel underemployed and their skills are being used. [2]
  • β—‹ Relocating for the Job 75% (up from 72% in 2016). [2]
  • Weekends and Evening 58% (up from 52% in 2016). [2]
  • β—‹ Unpaid Internship in Place of Paid Opening. [2]
  • In 2016, 92% of new graduates said that it’s important that their company is socially responsible. [2]
  • On top of that, 76% of individuals surveyed say that they’re more likely to trust content shared by β€œnormal” people than content shared by brands. [3]
  • Facebook still reigns as the most popular social media network with 79% of internet users in the US logging on the site. [3]
  • In Q4 2017, Twitter estimated an average of 330 million monthly active users across the globe–a 4% increase from 2016. [3]
  • 18to 29year olds indicated that they use any form of social media, 78% among those ages 30 to 49, to 64% among those ages 50 to 64. [3]
  • 67% of consumers surveyed say they are likely to purchase an item or service they see on their social feeds. [3]
  • 91% of social media users access social channels through mobile. [3]
  • 98% of employees use at least one social media site for personal use, of which 50% are already posting about their company. [3]
  • 58.8% of employees in a formal employee advocacy program spend more than five hours per week on social media for business use. [3]
  • For those in a non formal program, however, only 31.8% spent greater than five hours online. [3]
  • Employees who participate in a social employee advocacy program organically grow their social networks by 10%+ per year. [3]
  • 87.2% surveyed recognized employee advocacy contributed to expanding their professional network and. [3]
  • 76% believed that it helped them keep up with industry trends. [3]
  • 79% of firms surveyed reported more online visibility after the implementation of a formal employee advocacy program. [3]
  • 73% of salespeople using social selling as part of their sales process outperformed their sales peers and exceeded quota 23 percent more often. [3]
  • According to IBM, when a lead is generated through social selling or employee advocacy that lead is 7X more likely to close compared to other lead gen tactics. [3]
  • Sales reps using social media as part of their sales techniques outsell 78% of their peers. [3]
  • 91% of B2B buyers are active on social media. [3]
  • 64% of teams that use social selling hit quota compared to 49% that don’t. [3]
  • 80% believe their sales force would be more effective and efficient if they could leverage social media. [3]
  • People are 71% more likely to make a purchase based on a social media referral. [3]
  • An employee advocacy program can drive 16% better win rates, 2x pipeline, and deliver 48% larger deals. [3]
  • 79% of job applicants use social media in their job search. [3]
  • 47% of referral hires have greater job satisfaction and stay longer at companies. [3]
  • When asked which employee shared content consumers found most relevant, recruiting rose to the top 30% of consumers find job posting useful. [3]
  • Employee referrals have the highest applicant to hire conversion rate – only 7% of applicants are via employees but this accounts for 40% of all new hire hires. [3]
  • Companies with a successful employee advocacy program are 58% more likely to attract, and 20% more likely to retain, top talent. [3]
  • ( Companies with highly engaged teams have a 41% reduction in absenteeism and a 59% reduction in staff turnover. [3]
  • More than 80% of Americans say employee communication is key to developing trust with their employers. [3]
  • 74% of employees feel they are missing out on company information and news. [3]
  • 85% of employees said they’re most motivated when management offers regular updates on company news. [3]
  • More informed employees outperform their peers by 77%. [3]
  • When companies use social media internally, messages become content; a searchable record of knowledge can reduce, by as much as 35%, the time employees spend searching for company information. [3]

I know you want to use Employee Referral Software, thus we made this list of best Employee Referral Software. We also wrote about how to learn Employee Referral Software and how to install Employee Referral Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Employee Referral Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Employee Referral statistics of 2022.

Reference


  1. whattobecome – https://whattobecome.com/blog/employee-referral-statistics/.
  2. talentlyft – https://www.talentlyft.com/en/blog/article/364/top-50-hiring-and-recruitment-statistics-for-2020.
  3. zety – https://zety.com/blog/hr-statistics.
  4. everyonesocial – https://everyonesocial.com/blog/employee-advocacy-statistics/.
  5. firstbird – https://www.firstbird.com/en/blog-en/top-10-employee-referral-statistics-you-should-know/.
  6. apollotechnical – https://www.apollotechnical.com/employee-referral-statistics/.
  7. medium – https://medium.com/hr-blog-resources/8-most-important-employee-referral-statistics-f7c25cf41667.
  8. erinapp – https://erinapp.com/employee-referrals/employee-referral-statistics-you-need-to-know-for-2021-infographic/.
  9. goremotely – https://goremotely.net/blog/employee-referral-statistics/.
  10. forbes – https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffhyman/2019/01/30/grail/.
  11. preferhired – http://blog.preferhired.com/22-stats-to-build-your-case-for-an-employee-referral-program.
  12. socialtalent – https://www.socialtalent.com/blog/recruitment/the-incredible-true-value-of-an-employee-referral-infographic.
  13. shrm – https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/employee-referrals-remains-top-source-hires.aspx.
  14. hrtechweekly – https://hrtechweekly.com/2018/07/06/8-most-important-employee-referral-statistics/.
  15. bls – https://www.bls.gov/cps/definitions.htm.
  16. techfunnel – https://www.techfunnel.com/hr-tech/employee-referral-program/.
  17. saplinghr – https://www.saplinghr.com/10-employee-onboarding-statistics-you-must-know-in-2022.

In Conclusion

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