Facility Management Statistics 2023 - Everything You Need to Know


Are you looking to add Facility Management to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Facility Management statistics of 2023.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Facility Management stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Facility Management statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Facility Management have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Facility Management? We will answer all your Facility Management related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Facility Management Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 378 Facility Management Statistics on this page 🙂

Facility Management Usage Statistics

  • Using sensor technology to monitor energy usage in office buildings can reduce energy costs by as much as 20 percent. [0]

Facility Management Market Statistics

  • The global market for enterprise asset management softwareis valued at $4 billion, and it’s expected to grow at a CAGR of 11% per year. [1]
  • By 2020, available office space will decrease by 17 percent and there will be 15 percent fewer desks per employee, according to market research company Frost & Sullivan.13. [0]
  • This market value increased7.78%over 12 months. [2]
  • That’s 35.95% of the global market, which is valued at $13.88 billion. [2]
  • North America’s market value grew 7.78% from 2019 to 2020. [2]
  • 39% of the national industry market share ultimately goes to the property managers themselves. [2]
  • This is a 6.6% greater market share than the global average, which is 36.6%. [2]
  • The total market size for renters is 34%. [2]
  • In 2018, the resident retention rate in the largest 50 US markets was52.5%– up .8% from 2017. [3]
  • At61.9%, Milwaukee and Newark/Jersey City had the highest resident retention rates of all large US markets in 2018. [3]
  • At46.3%, Salt Lake City and San Antonio had the worst resident retention rates of all large US markets in 2018. [3]
  • According to ParcelPending, Millennials represent40%of the total housing marketing, with90%of all Millennials being renters. [3]
  • The market size of the Facilities Management and Other Office Administrative Services industry is expected to increase 1.3% in 2023. [4]
  • The market size of the Facilities Management and Other Office Administrative Services industry in Australia has declined 0.3% per year on average between 2017 and 2023. [4]
  • Based on our analysis, the global market exhibited a lower growth of 0.2% in 2020 as compared to the average yearonyear growth during 2017. [5]
  • The market is projected to grow from USD 1,249.45 billion in 2021 to USD 1,759.25 billion in 2028 at a CAGR of 5.0% during the 2021. [5]
  • The market will grow at a 5.0% CAGR in the forecast period. [5]

Facility Management Software Statistics

  • The global market for enterprise asset management softwareis valued at $4 billion, and it’s expected to grow at a CAGR of 11% per year. [1]
  • Perhaps coincidentally, about80% of all CMMS usersdon’t use all the functions offered by the software. [1]
  • For one company in 2017, data visualization software reduced production hours by320 hourswhile also increasing production by 15%. [1]
  • Roughly10% of industrial equipment ever actually wears out, meaning a very large portion of mechanical failures are avoidable. [1]
  • Historically, total productive maintenance has been shown toincrease plant capacity by over 10%and productivity by 50%, but over half of all attempts to implement TPM result in failure. [1]

Facility Management Latest Statistics

  • Employment of administrative services and facilities managers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. [6]
  • Between 2004 and 2008,the U.S. spent about 57% of its transportation infrastructure budgeton new construction projects. [1]
  • The 43% leftover was spent on maintaining the 98.7% of roads remaining. [1]
  • The U.S. has over47,000 bridgesthat are considered to be in urgent need of repairs, while 38% of all America’s bridges need some form of repair work. [1]
  • As of 2018, about53% of facilities use a CMMSto monitor their maintenance. [1]
  • Additionally, 55% use spreadsheets and schedules, and 44% still use paper. [1]
  • In 2017, 78% of companies who used a CMMS to manage their assets reported seeing improvements in equipment life. [1]
  • Up to80% of all attempted CMMS implementations fail. [1]
  • The job outlook for maintenance professionals is projected to grow atabout 8%over the next ten years. [1]
  • About 44% of all unscheduled equipment downtimesresult from aging equipment, making it the leading cause of unscheduled downtime. [1]
  • Unplanned downtimes cost an estimated$50 billion every year. [1]
  • Overall, downtime costs most factories somewhere between5% and 20%of their productive capacity. [1]
  • to30% of all manufacturing deathsare related to a maintenance activity. [1]
  • Companies can save between12% and 18%by using preventive maintenance over reactive, and each dollar spent on PM saves an average of $5 later on. [1]
  • Factories throughout the U.S. are estimated to be using about$40 billion worthof outdated equipment. [1]
  • As of 2017,about 53% of companiesadopted big data analytics, which includes predictive maintenance and IIoT technologies. [1]
  • By 2024, IIoT technologies are predicted to help createnearly $800 billionin economic value. [1]
  • Roughly 30%of all manufacturers have difficulty understanding IoT. [1]
  • Worldwide spending on IoT technology is estimated to reach$1.2 trillion in 2023with a CAGR of 13.6%. [1]
  • The number of connected devices in use worldwide is estimated to beover 17 billion, with 7 billion IoT devices. [1]
  • The overall use of predictive maintenance rose from47% in 2017 to 51% in 2018, though preventive maintenance is still preferred by 80% of maintenance personnel. [1]
  • 80% of manufacturing plantsuse preventive maintenance, and over half usepredictive maintenancewith analytical tools. [1]
  • In 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated that the nation would beshort 10 million workersover the course of the following six years. [1]
  • Predictive analytics yields atenfold returnon investment, and it results in a savings of 30% to 40%. [1]
  • The number of facilities whoconsidered this a challenge was 49%. [1]
  • 79% of businessessee predictive maintenance as the main application of industrial data analytics. [1]
  • The number of U.S. employers offering flexible workplace options has grown by 40 percent in the past five years.2. [0]
  • As many as 30 40 percent of all U.S. workers today are contingent.3. [0]
  • Seventy seven percent of workplaces in the U.S. use a combination of an open office and private, individual offices or a solely open office environment.4. [0]
  • Around 8090 percent of U.S. professionals say they would like the ability to work remotely at least part. [0]
  • Forty four percent of companies offer a flexible work structure, such as allowing employees to choose when and where they work.8. [0]
  • Forty percent of U.S. employees rate themselves as “engaged” and “satisfied” or “highly engaged” and “highly satisfied” with their workplace, placing them among the most engaged and most satisfied professionals in the world.10. [0]
  • Fifty two percent of corporate executives say they plan to implement some level of unassigned seating in the workplace within the next three years.11. [0]
  • Fifty one percent of all CRE leaders anticipate implementing a shared workplace model in the next year.12. [0]
  • Healthy Offices Research team found that promoting a healthy work environment with plants, circadian lighting and opportunities to meditate and exercise improved work performance by 22 percent. [0]
  • Fifty nine percent of executives plan to introduce mobile employee experience apps to help employees navigate an agile work environment.15. [0]
  • Forty eight percent of senior corporate real estate executives utilize technology to capture more accurate data to support their business objectives.16. [0]
  • Globally, 54 percent of employees have the option to bring their own device to work.17. [0]
  • Millennials, the first “digital native” generation, will make up 75 percent of the workforce by 2030.18. [0]
  • Fifty eight percent of employees at “technology laggard” companies have negative feelings towards their employers.19. [0]
  • The shortcomings of employer provided smartphones has resulted in 43 percent of employees using their personal devices for work, which makes the company more vulnerable to security risks.21. [0]
  • Over 80 percent of global employees are given a desktop computer and landline phone, but only 39 percent receive an employer provided smartphone or laptop. [0]
  • Deployment of IoT sensor technology in corporate real estate is expected to grow by 79 percent between 2015 and 2020.25. [0]
  • Real estate generates16%of the national gross domestic product. [2]
  • The industry’s average annual growth rate for the last 5 years has been 2.5%. [2]
  • Since December 2003, the producer price index among real estate property managers nationwide has increased 20.0% for an annual growth rate of 1.143%. [2]
  • That’s 59.95% of all working property managers. [2]
  • The lowest paid 10% earn $31,330 per year while the highest paid earn $134,570 per year. [2]
  • Industry experts expect a compound annual growth rate of 9.3%. [2]
  • Since December 2003, the industry’s PPI has increased 33.3% for an annual growth rate of 1.903%. [2]
  • Since December 1995, the PPI for residential property management services has risen 39.2% for an annual growth rate of 1.537%. [2]
  • 81% of property managers have seen their revenues increase over in the past two years. [2]
  • 5% of managers saw a decrease in revenue. [2]
  • 88% of survey respondents expected their revenues to go up in the next two years. [2]
  • That’s 31.2% of all residential rental units in. [2]
  • 80% of property managers are involved in the coordination or performance of maintenance/repairs as well as rent and fee collections. [2]
  • More than 70% of property managers perform property inspections, advertise vacancies, and facilitate leases. [2]
  • 47.8% of property managers consider growth a top priority. [2]
  • 45.1% express a desire to improve efficiency. [2]
  • 31.0% of property managers cite profitability as a top concern. [2]
  • Between 2009 and 2020, the national rental vacancy rate decreased by 85%. [2]
  • The current nationwide rental vacancy rate is 6%. [2]
  • If trends from the last decade continue, the vacancy rate should drop below 4 percent by 2025. [2]
  • 42 percent of all U.S. renters live in single. [2]
  • Between 20 and 43 percent of renters cannot afford to buy a home or unit where they live. [2]
  • In one decade, the number of renters increased by 25%. [2]
  • During that same period, the number of homeowners decreased by just over 1%. [2]
  • Wisconsin has fewer property managers per capita than any other state, about 30% of the national average. [2]
  • Puerto Rico has less than 5% the national per capita average. [2]
  • This is 26.3% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 15.03% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $25,900. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $88,670. [2]
  • This is 0.23% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 12.75% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • This is 14.59% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 27.74% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $31,900. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $101,750. [2]
  • This is 23,25% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 19.28% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $26,530. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $87,600. [2]
  • This is 2.98% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 5.47% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $29,290. [2]
  • This is 29.39% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 49.13% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $43,210. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $169,030. [2]
  • This is 13.66% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 4.31% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $46,880. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $147,950. [2]
  • This is 15.41% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 9.09% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $37,110. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $96,420. [2]
  • This is 23.22% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 3.61% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $46,420. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $155,610. [2]
  • This is 14.83% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 23.22% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $32,040. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $96,600. [2]
  • This is 16.91% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 18.89% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $27,980. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $114,220. [2]
  • This is 8.35% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 10.49% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $37,630. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $106,090. [2]
  • This is 44.45% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 16.34% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $17,620. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $71,560. [2]
  • This is 10.31% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 28.24% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $35,830. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $138,000. [2]
  • This is 26.21% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 5.22% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $29,360. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $83,560. [2]
  • This is 20.02% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 6.03% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $32,900. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $95,390. [2]
  • This is 27.52% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 5.37% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $25,430. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $85,620. [2]
  • This is 22.13% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 22.58% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $27,930. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $88,210. [2]
  • This is 29.71% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 2.84% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $18,950. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $90,130. [2]
  • This is 16.01% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 13.40% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $35,320. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $95,780. [2]
  • This is 5.74% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 13.41% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $37,040. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $128,950. [2]
  • This is 23.58% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 13.48% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $50,180. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $139,920. [2]
  • This is 9.82% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 24.60% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $33,650. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $105,290. [2]
  • This is 1.87% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 21.19% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $42,600. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $123,780. [2]
  • This is 40.34% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 4.64% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $18,850. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $70,660. [2]
  • This is 8.40% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 31.04% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $29,850. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $132,480. [2]
  • This is 35.91% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 12.02% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $20,040. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $78,730. [2]
  • This is 12.98% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 9.95% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $19,930. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $105,690. [2]
  • This is 26.20% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 0.74% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $36,730. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $74,330. [2]
  • This is 2.83% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 7.11% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $40,220. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $107,370. [2]
  • This is 30.36% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 26.84% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $46,670. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $193,420. [2]
  • This is 22.48% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 23.90% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $26,720. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $84,350. [2]
  • This is 58.00% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 53.11% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $62,280. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $196,410. [2]
  • This is 4.66% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 39.36% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $36,200. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $114,560. [2]
  • This is 23.73% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 5.97% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $35,760. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $83,220. [2]
  • This is 11.67% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 21.34% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $23,140. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $122,910. [2]
  • This is 21.57% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 80.71% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $28,740. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $180,870. [2]
  • This is 23.58% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 1.44% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $31,870. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $91,270. [2]
  • This is 25.39% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 47.59% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $40,630. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $190,740. [2]
  • This is 22.65% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $32,540. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $140,320. [2]
  • This is 25.91% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 51.52% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $52,880. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $132,800. [2]
  • This is 0.82% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 52.86% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $27,480. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $128,490. [2]
  • This is 40.35% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 23.75% less than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $27,570. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $62,440. [2]
  • This is 18.86% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 17.51% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $26.760. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $105,310. [2]
  • This is 18.11% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 57.67% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $32,860. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $168,310. [2]
  • This is 25.64% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 4.19% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $25,680. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $96,340. [2]
  • This is 11.19% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 10.86% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $28,200. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $107,910. [2]
  • This is 21.85% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $27,840. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $83,500. [2]
  • This is 27.06% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 49.16% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $47,930. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $145,580. [2]
  • This is 27.74% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 36.88% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $45,940. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $158,220. [2]
  • This is 23.86% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 23.57% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $23,070. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $110,720. [2]
  • This is 0.12% above the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 32.10% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $39,260. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $125,790. [2]
  • This is 7.39% below the national average wage for property managers. [2]
  • Property managers make 7.17% more than the average worker statewide. [2]
  • The 10% lowest paid property managers earn an average of $24,850. [2]
  • The 10% highest paid earn $129,360. [2]
  • Among surveyed property managers, however, just 11.2% say technology is a top priority. [2]
  • 80%of property managers are tasked with managing or performing building maintenance on top of collecting rent. [3]
  • %, the majority of property managers manage communities of 101. [3]
  • %, the least common type of property manager is those who manage communities of more than 500 units. [3]
  • 56%of property managers own the building they’re managing. [3]
  • 52%of property management companies make less than $249,000 in annual revenue. [3]
  • Only13%of property management companies make more than $1 million in annual revenue. [3]
  • Property managers say efficiency (at32%) an maintenance (at31%). [3]
  • 69%of property managers reported portfolio growth in 2019, down from each of the previous three years. [3]
  • There are an estimated291,978property management companies in the US in 2020. [3]
  • 90.3%of Millennial respondents said they would or would consider paying higher rent for better amenities or proptech. [3]
  • 87.2%of multifamily residents say amenities significantly impact their decision to sign or renew a lease. [3]
  • 93.6%of multifamily residents said that would or would consider paying higher rent for improved onsite amenities. [3]
  • The most common types of amenities found in multifamily communities are fitness & wellness amenities at19.5%of all properties. [3]
  • The most common specific amenity found in multifamily properties is bike storage rooms, at60%of all communities. [3]
  • of53.3%, up from52.5%of renters in 2019. [3]
  • Before COVID 19, apartment retention rates had reached58.5%. [3]
  • The current rental vacancy rate in the US is6%. [3]
  • Reducing resident turnover by5%improves operating income for property management companies by an average of $15,000. [3]
  • The average renewal rate for those resigning leases has been1.6%since June, a favorable number for renters due to the economic downturn from COVID. [3]
  • While the majority of renters sign a 12 month lease (61%). [3]
  • 47%of renters who moved in 2018 already planned to move in the following year. [3]
  • 52%of renters in 2018 had regrets about signing a lease because they were unable to customize or improve the property. [3]
  • In December 2020,89%of renters made their rent payment – meaning over 1 in 10 renters were not able to make rent. [3]
  • 44 millionhomes (36%). [3]
  • In 2019,66%of US counties saw the cost of renting increase. [3]
  • Over50%of renters spend30%or more of their income on rent. [3]
  • From 2017 to 2019, new multifamily property construction projects increase by21%. [3]
  • The fastest growing renting segment of the population is households over 60, which grew by43%last year from 6.5 million to 9.4 million. [3]
  • Since COVID 19, San Francisco has seen the biggest drop in rent growth, down24.5%since March 2020 – from $3,200 down to $2,300. [3]
  • Since COVID 19, Boise has seen the biggest rise in rent growth, up9.1%since March 2020 – from $3,200 down to $2,300. [3]
  • Suburban cities have seen a slight increase in rent prices since COVID. [3]
  • Open plan floor plans (33%) now outrank private, individual offices (23%). [7]
  • 45% of surveyed companies anticipate moving to an activity based workspace curated to improve employee effectiveness. [7]
  • By 2020, available office space will decrease by 17%, with 15% fewer desks per employee. [7]
  • 4.3 million employees (3.2% of the workforce). [7]
  • Researchers estimate as many as 30% to 40% of all U.S. workers today are contingent or affiliated with the gig economy in some way. [7]
  • 14% of employees at large companies use coworking spaces and 40% of flexible workspace demand is forecast to come from these companies. [7]
  • 88% of workers characterized themselves as “highly engaged” when given the ability to choose their workstation based on their current task. [7]
  • Job turnover at companies with positive culture averages 14%; job turnover in low company cultures is 48%. [7]
  • 88% of employees say that a distinct workplace culture rooted in defined core beliefs is important to business success. [7]
  • 59% of surveyed companies intend to introduce mobile apps to their workforce to improve connectivity and navigation. [7]
  • Investment in corporate real estate IoT sensor technology is expected to grow 79% by 2020. [7]
  • 48% of senior corporate real estate executives now use office IoT devices to capture data in support of business objectives. [7]
  • In 2017 a well know SEO specialist made a case study researching more than 2 million pages and found out that only 6% of them are qualified for worthy and being ranked on the first page of Google. [8]
  • In other words, almost 94% of these pages are not getting even a single visitor from the search engines and that’s mostly because the content they provide is not with the needed amount of quality and length. [8]
  • The number 1 result in Google search results has an average Click Through Rate of 31.7%. [8]
  • 40% of leads are influenced by a relevant organic search. [8]
  • Of these, ICE has resources to monitor approximately 5 percent of the total non detained population, or approximately 100,000 undocumented individuals. [9]
  • According to the Ministry of Energy, Saudi Arabia, the country has planned to invest USD 425 billion . [5]
  • The number of people employed as Facilities managers has been growing at a rate of 12.3%, from 105,336 people in 2018 to 118,328 people in 2019. [10]
  • Colleges, universities & professional schools, including junior colleges employs the largest share of Facilities managers at 8.68%, followed by Elementary & secondary schools with 6.66% and Religious organizations. [10]
  • Gender Composition 81.8% of Facilities managers are Male, making them the more common gender in the occupation. [10]
  • 71.6% of Facilities managers are White , making that the most common race or ethnicity in the occupation. [10]
  • Representing 10.2% of Facilities managers, Black is the second most common race or ethnicity in this occupation. [10]
  • Among the review’s findings • 39 percent of buildings with a rating of 75 or better were less than 25 years old. [11]
  • 42 percent of buildings with a rating of 25 74 were less than 25 years old. [11]
  • 35 percent of buildings with a rating of less than 25 were less than 25 years old. [11]
  • Few facilities (9%). [12]
  • Some facilities (44%). [12]
  • Over 40% of these deaths occur in subSaharan Africa, and one half occur in the perinatal period [3–5]. [12]
  • The two progress markers for this stage were mostly achieved (by at least 68% of facilities). [12]
  • In most facilities (89%), leaders were fully involved in championing death audits, and nearly all facilities (98%). [12]
  • Among the seven progress markers in this stage, four were mostly achieved, one was moderately achieved (34–67% of facilities), and two were rarely achieved . [12]
  • < 33% of facilities), though findings varied among and within countries. [12]
  • Nearly all facilities (94%). [12]
  • Standard MPDSR data collection forms were available in 84% of health facilities. [12]
  • Most facilities reported that they assigned specific follow up actions to individuals with timelines (79%). [12]
  • Le than one half of the facilitie (44%). [12]
  • One half of facilities held meetings on a predetermined schedule (53%). [12]
  • Most facilities demonstrated evidence of multidisciplinary participation in death audit meetings (86%). [12]
  • ‘ – ‘ – ‘ – ‘ – Three quarters of health facilities reported regularly linking MPDSR to other quality improvement activities at their facilities (74%). [12]
  • One third of the facilities reported sharing death audit findings, recommendations, and progress with the community (34%). [12]
  • Most facilities assessed (83%). [12]
  • Evidence of staff development to sustain MPDSR practice was partially achieved, with only 45% of facilities reporting that staff had received MPDSR training in the past year. [12]
  • A plan in place to ensure all staff receive MPDSR training was rarely achieved by the assessed facilities (24%). [12]
  • The qualitative responses supported these findings ‘ – Table 5 summarises the top three barriers and enablers of MPDSR implementation as observed by the assessors and as reported by facility informants. [12]
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that facility management careers will see a 10% growth rate from 2016 to 2026. [13]
  • This position will also see a 10% growth rate from 2018 to 2028. [13]

I know you want to use Facility Management Software, thus we made this list of best Facility Management Software. We also wrote about how to learn Facility Management Software and how to install Facility Management Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Facility Management Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Facility Management statistics of 2023.

Reference


  1. iofficecorp – https://www.iofficecorp.com/blog/facility-management-statistics.
  2. upkeep – https://www.upkeep.com/blog/35-of-the-most-interesting-statistics-about-maintenance-and-facility-management.
  3. ipropertymanagement – https://ipropertymanagement.com/research/property-management-industry-statistics.
  4. 2ndkitchen – https://2ndkitchen.com/apartments/property-management-statistics/.
  5. ibisworld – https://www.ibisworld.com/au/market-size/facilities-management-other-office-administrative-services/.
  6. fortunebusinessinsights – https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/industry-reports/facility-management-market-101658.
  7. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/administrative-services-managers.htm.
  8. spaceiq – https://spaceiq.com/blog/facilities-management-industry-statistics/.
  9. ngbmanagement – https://www.ngbmanagement.com/post/property-management-statistics-and-information.
  10. ice – https://www.ice.gov/detain/detention-management.
  11. datausa – https://datausa.io/profile/soc/facilities-managers.
  12. facilitiesnet – https://www.facilitiesnet.com/energyefficiency/article/EPA-Statistics-Debunk-Energy-Efficiency-Myth–16554.
  13. plos – https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243722.
  14. akitabox – https://home.akitabox.com/blog/facilities-management-jobs-and-careers.

In Conclusion

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