Fundraising Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
Last updated: 
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Are you looking to add Fundraising to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Fundraising statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Fundraising stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Fundraising statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Fundraising have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Fundraising? We will answer all your Fundraising related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Fundraising Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 581 Fundraising Statistics on this page 🙂

Fundraising Benefits Statistics

  • 40% subsequently purchase a product that benefits that charity. [0]
  • 40% subsequently purchase a product that benefits that charity. [1]

Fundraising Usage Statistics

  • 75% of Pinterest usage takes place on mobile devices. [0]
  • 79% of people said that they would increase their usage of mobile payments if discounts or coupons were offered. [0]
  • 75% of Pinterest usage takes place on mobile devices. [1]

Fundraising Market Statistics

  • 2018 Benchmark Report] Email based marketing and promotional campaigns generated 28% of all online nonprofit revenue in 2017. [2]
  • 27% of nonprofits spend less than $1,000 of their budget on marketing a year. [3]
  • 33% of donors say that email is the marketing channel that inspires them to give the most, up from 31% the previous year. [4]
  • 42% of marketers report that Facebook is critical or important to their business. [0]
  • 93% of social marketers use Facebook advertise regularly. [0]
  • 40% of a direct marketing campaign. [0]

Fundraising Software Statistics

  • 96% of employees have a strong preference for their company to match donations made directly to a nonprofit rather than only matching donations through a workplace giving software platform. [2]
  • Campaigns that are shared fewer than 2 times have a 97% chance of failure. [0]

Fundraising Adoption Statistics

  • 58% of nonprofit social media happens on mobile 95% mobile phone adoption rate for US adults 81% smartphone adoption rate for US adults 51% of US donors do not have a landline. [0]

Fundraising Latest Statistics

  • Overall giving grew 4.1% over the past year, the 6th consecutive year of growth. [2]
  • Online giving grew by 12.1% over the past year. [2]
  • 45% of worldwide donors are enrolled in a monthly giving program. [2]
  • 41% of worldwide donors give in response to natural disasters. [2]
  • Missions related to international affairs experienced a 19.2% increase in overall donations over the past year. [2]
  • 31% of offlineonly firsttime donors are retained for over a year, versus 25% of onlineonly first. [2]
  • 30% of annual giving happens in December, with about 10% of all annual donations coming in the last three days of the year. [2]
  • 31% of worldwide donors give to organizations located outside of their country of residence. [2]
  • 67% of worldwide donors also choose to volunteer locally in their communities, and 56% regularly attend fundraising events. [2]
  • Overall online revenue increased by 23% over the past year, up from 15%. [2]
  • Online donations to environmental and human rights related missions grew the most, 34% and 37% respectively. [2]
  • 38% of online donors who made a gift in 2016 made another gift to that nonprofit the next year. [2]
  • Revenue from individual online gifts grew by 19% over the past year. [2]
  • Online monthly giving revenue grew by 40% as recurring donation options become increasingly popular with online donors. [2]
  • Online donation pages had an average conversion rate of 8% on mobile devices last year, but the number of transactions completed through mobile devices increased by 50%. [2]
  • The number of donations completed through desktop browsersdecreasedby 10%. [2]
  • The share of desktop based trafficdecreasedby 9% over the previous year. [2]
  • Between 2013 and 2017, giving increased by more than 15% for 6 out of 10 companies. [2]
  • 40% of Fortune 500 companies offer volunteer grant programs. [2]
  • 65% of companies surveyed provided employees with paid release time volunteer programs in 2017. [2]
  • Microsoft is the largest contributor of corporate philanthropy funds, with a 65% employee participation rate for annual giving campaigns. [2]
  • However, an estimated $6 – $10 billion in matching gift funds goes unclaimed every year. [2]
  • Only 12% of total corporate cash donations to nonprofits are made through matching gift programs. [2]
  • Only 1.31% of individual contributions made to the average nonprofit are matched. [2]
  • Instagram was the fastest growing social media platform for nonprofits in 2017, with a 44% increase in followers. [2]
  • Fundraising email response rates have seen a 9% decline, and click through rates fell to .42% in 2017. [2]
  • 18% of Americans have said that supporting youth and family causes are most important to them. [3]
  • Men between the ages of 18 and 34 are more likely to make a charitable donation than any other group. [3]
  • 60% of millennials donate an average of $481 to nonprofits each year. [3]
  • 69% of all donations are made by individuals.17% are made byfoundations.10% are made through. [3]
  • Individuals that earn $25,000 or less donate the largest share (16.6%). [3]
  • 12% of all giving happens in the last three days of the year. [3]
  • 35% of all giving happens in the last three months of the year. [3]
  • Monthly donors give 42% more in one year than one. [3]
  • 88% of dollars raised comes from 12% of an organization’s donors. [3]
  • Giving is projected to increase by 5.1% in 2021. [3]
  • In 2019, religious organizations received the majority (29%). [3]
  • Education organizations received the next highest percentage of total giving (14%). [3]
  • Almost half (45%). [3]
  • Online gifts made up roughly 13% of online gifts in 2020, up from 8.7% of total giving in 2019. [3]
  • Online donations made up 14.1% of all donations received by nonprofits earning less than one million dollars per year. [3]
  • Online giving grew 21 percent in 2020. [3]
  • 47% of donors over the age of 60 give online. [3]
  • 75% of young donors are turned off by outof date websites Donations made on a branded donation form are, on average, 38% larger than contributions made through a generic PayPal page. [3]
  • Supporters are nearly 70% more likely to give a second donation if they used a branded page the first time they made a contribution. [3]
  • Online resources are considered 20% more useful than direct mail when it comes to influencing donors. [3]
  • 57% of people who watch nonprofit videos go on to make a donation. [3]
  • Donors are 34% more likely to give on responsive websites. [3]
  • 42% of traffic to nonprofit websites came from organic traffic in 2020. [3]
  • 74% of American internet users are on Facebook. [3]
  • For nonprofits 1.3% of all online revenue came via Facebook fundraisers. [3]
  • There was a 14% increase in revenue from Facebook Fundraisers in 2020. [3]
  • 81.6% of donors look at your nonprofit website and your social media accounts first for updates on your organization. [3]
  • Approximately 26% of all online giving was processed on mobile devices. [3]
  • 19.4% of nonprofit event registrations occur on mobile devices. [3]
  • 51% of people who visit a nonprofit’s website do so on a mobile device. [3]
  • Mobile responsive donation pages yield 34% more donations. [3]
  • Apple devices like iPhones and iPads processed 80% of all mobile donations in past years. [3]
  • Text donors are most likely to be 49to 59years old, married women who have college degrees. [3]
  • 41% of Americans don’t have a landline. [3]
  • 91% of Americans own a smartphone and look at them around 80 times a day. [3]
  • 98% of text messages are opened within the first 5 minutes. [3]
  • Nonprofit text messaging audiences grew by 26% in 2020, the same percentage as in 2019. [3]
  • To achieve a 200% ROI for text fundraising, your nonprofit would need to raise $387./. [3]
  • 16.6% of donors who support from an email are doing so on a mobile device. [3]
  • Open rates for nonprofit emails is between 15% and 17.5%. [3]
  • The dollar amount raised by 1,000 fundraising messages sent increased by 35% in 2020. [3]
  • The average response rate for an advocacy email rose 5% in 2020, while the response rate for fundraising emails grew 41% for the same time period. [3]
  • The retention rate for peerto peer fundraisers was 25.1% in 2019, but it dropped to 14.7% in 2020. [3]
  • In fact, 84% of Generation Z is open to becoming a fundraiser on behalf of your organization!. [3]
  • 56% of donors regularly attend fundraising events. [3]
  • 69.9% of nonprofits plan to include some virtual elements in their fundraisers going forward. [3]
  • 23.7% plan to stick with virtual going forward. [3]
  • 65% of Fortune 500 companies offer a matching gifts program. [3]
  • Here are some key overall fundraising statistics to help illustrate the current state of giving Individual donors gave an estimated total of $309.66 billion last year. [4]
  • Total charitable giving increased 4.2% last year. [4]
  • 90% of Millennial donors are motivated to give by a compelling mission, rather than a specific organization. [4]
  • Over the course of five years, major gifts of more than $1,000 grew to 85% of the revenue at the average nonprofit. [4]
  • Only about 20% of first time donors make a second gift to the organization. [4]
  • 55% of donors in the United States prefer to be thanked for their contributions via email. [4]
  • 62% of donors contributed to a nonprofit in response to the COVID. [4]
  • 33% of donors in the United States and Canada give to nonprofits that are located outside of their country of residence. [4]
  • 16% of donors prefer to give via direct mail. [4]
  • Here are some important email fundraising statistics to note The response rate for fundraising emails increased by 1% last year, to 0.05%. [4]
  • The size of email lists decreased by 2% last year. [4]
  • Email open rates for nonprofits is 25.2%. [4]
  • 66% of nonprofits send fundraising appeals via email. [4]
  • These are some of the top social media fundraising statistics 18% of donors who give online report that social media is the channel that most inspires them to give, a decrease from the previous year. [4]
  • Of the donors who are inspired to give by social media outreach, 56% of them say Facebook has the biggest impact on them. [4]
  • 40% of donors give through Facebook Fundraising tools. [4]
  • Facebook giving made up 3.5% of all online revenue last year, and much of this was around Giving Tuesday. [4]
  • 87% of donors who donate for the first time from a social referral source will also make their second donation from a social referral source. [4]
  • 97% of nonprofits use social media on a regular basis to engage their supporters. [4]
  • 34% of donors give via crowdfunding campaigns. [4]
  • 10% of donors create their own peerto peer fundraising campaigns on behalf of nonprofits. [4]
  • 39% of nonprofits use a peerto peer fundraising platform, an increase of 31% from the previous year. [4]
  • 40% of nonprofits have a written social media strategy. [4]
  • 48% of nonprofits use an editorial calendar to organize their social media outreach and campaigns. [4]
  • Check out these top online fundraising statistics Making your “Donate” button stand out on your website can result in a 190% increase in donations. [4]
  • Online giving made up 8.7% of overall fundraising last year. [4]
  • 63% of donors in the United States and Canada prefer to donate online using a credit or debit card. [4]
  • 10% of donors prefer to give via PayPal. [4]
  • Total online revenue increased by 10% last year. [4]
  • Approximately 39% of donors who gave a gift online to a nonprofit in a given year made a gift online to that nonprofit again the following year. [4]
  • Organic visitors to a nonprofit’s website made up 44% of total nonprofit web traffic last year. [4]
  • Desktop users make up 61% of donation transactions on a nonprofit’s website. [4]
  • Here are some important recurring giving statistics to note Revenue from monthly gifts has increased by 22%, which is more than twice as much revenue as from one. [4]
  • Monthly giving made up 17% of all online revenue last year. [4]
  • Only 14% of nonprofits prompt donors to make their donation a recurring gift during the donation process. [4]
  • 91% of organizations stop acknowledging recurring gifts by the third month. [4]
  • A popup message that asks a donor to make their one gift gift a recurring gift results in a 64% increase in monthly donations. [4]
  • Recurring donors give 42% more per year than one. [4]
  • 57% of donors are enrolled in a recurring giving program, up 46% from the previous year. [4]
  • 94% of donors enrolled in a recurring giving program prefer to give on a monthly basis. [4]
  • 3% of donors enrolled in a recurring giving program prefer to give annually, while 2% give quarterly and 1% give weekly. [4]
  • 52% of Millennials surveyed are interested in monthly giving. [4]
  • Here are some important mobile giving statistics Mobile users made up 33% of online donation transactions last year. [4]
  • Mobile users grew as a portion of donation transactions by 17% compared to the previous year. [4]
  • SMS open rates are as high as 98%. [4]
  • Mobile friendly donation pages yield 34% more donations. [4]
  • 56% of all emails are read on a mobile device, which means it’s even more important now to ensure your communications and giving pages are mobile responsive. [4]
  • 1% of donors in the United States and Canada prefer to give via textto. [4]
  • 98% of Millennials own a smartphone and 37% of them have used it to donate. [4]
  • Text message audiences grew by 26% last year. [4]
  • Text message volume grew by 14% overall for nonprofits last year. [4]
  • Fundraising text messages had a 4.2% click through rate last year. [4]
  • 12% of all giving occurs on the last three days of the year. [4]
  • 26% of donors in the United States and Canada gave to a nonprofit on Giving Tuesday last year. [4]
  • November and December of last year made up 26% of all Facebook’s revenue, and much of this was due to Giving Tuesday. [4]
  • In the United States, the average charitable giver is 64 years old with Baby Boomers accounting for 41% of charitable giving. [5]
  • International gifts are the highest after a natural disaster, and in 2018, 41% of global donors gave specifically because of natural disasters. [5]
  • In addition, 35% of women give tribute gifts compared to only 21% of men. [5]
  • Women and men have almost identical enrollment rates in monthly giving programs with women at 45% and men at 46%. [5]
  • In 2019, December accounted for 18% of all financial contributions for the year and 19.8% of financial contributions given online. [5]
  • At 20.7% of their yearly total, animal welfare, K 12 education and medical research were the sectors that received the highest amount of charitable contributions in December 2019. [5]
  • In fact, charitable giving from bequests added up to more than $43 billion in 2019, which is up almost 10% compared to 2017, and over twenty times the amount given 40 years ago. [5]
  • In 2014, less than 10% (9%) of online charitable donations were made on mobile devices, and only 5 years later, donations made on mobile devices has climbed to over one quarter (26%). [5]
  • From 2018 to 2019, overall donations increased by 4.2%. [5]
  • At $309.66 billion, giving by individuals increased by 4.7% from the previous year. [5]
  • In the United States, all three of the organizational types that saw more than a 10% growth increase support people and making the country a better one for future generations. [5]
  • More than half of nonprofits will do 13, but a staggering 27.6% of nonprofits surveyed make zero “touches” for their year end campaign, with the remaining ~10% making more than 5. [6]
  • Employment of fundraisers is projected to grow 16 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. [7]
  • Americans gave $410 billion to charities in 2017, up 5%. [0]
  • 31% of donors worldwide give to NGOs, NPOs & charities located outside of their country of residence. [0]
  • 41% give in response to natural disasters. [0]
  • Education giving saw relatively slower growth compared to the strong growth rates experienced in most post. [0]
  • In each of the years 2014 and 2015 education giving grew by more than 8 percent. [0]
  • Total charitable giving grew 4.1% in 2016 and 5% in 2017. [0]
  • Foundation giving in 2016 increased to $58.28 billion – a 3.5% increase from 2015. [0]
  • Giving to Education charities was up 6.2% to $58.9 billion (14% of all donations). [0]
  • Donations to Human Services charities were up 5.1% to $50.06 billion (12% of all donations). [0]
  • Foundations saw an increase of % to $45.89 billion (11% of all donations). [0]
  • Health charities experienced an increase of 15.5% to $38.27 billion (9% of all donations). [0]
  • Public Society Benefit charities saw an increase of 7.8% to $29.59 billion (7% of all donations). [0]
  • Giving to International charities decreased by 4.4% to $22.97 billion (6% of all donations). [0]
  • Arts, Culture and Humanities saw an increase of 8.7% to $19.51 billion (5% of all donations). [0]
  • Charities that focus on the Environment / Animals saw an increase of 7.2% to $11.83 billion (3% of all donations). [0]
  • With the 2.9% increase in donations this year, 31% of all donations, or $127.37 billion, went to Religious organizations. [0]
  • In 2017, the largest source of charitable giving came from individuals at $281.86 billion, or 72% of total giving; followed by foundations ($58.28 billion/15%), bequests ($30.36 billion/8%), and corporations ($18.55 billion/5%). [0]
  • In 2016, the majority of charitable dollars went to religion (32%), education (16%), human services (12%), grantmaking foundations (11%), and health (9%). [0]
  • Environmental and animal organizations experienced the largest giving increase in 2016, receiving 7.2% more than the previous year. [0]
  • Charitable giving accounted for 2.1% of gross domestic product in 2016. [0]
  • Approximately 91% of high net worth households give to charity. [0]
  • 56% of the country’s public schools have at least one donor appeal on its site. [0]
  • Traditional product fundraising accounts for roughly 80% of the dollars that school groups use to provide “extras” for their schools. [0]
  • 67% of principals turn fundraising decisions over to their PTO or PTA, even though experts believe this hands off approach actually hampers a fundraiser’ssuccess. [0]
  • 71% of parents said they’ve sold fundraising products to friends, family, and co. [0]
  • 35% of schools average $0 – $5,000 in annual earnings from fundraising while 27.1% earn more than $75,000. [0]
  • Charitable contributions to colleges and universities in the United States increased only 1.7% in2016. [0]
  • The Top 20 fundraising institutions together raised $11.12 billion, 27.1 percent of the 2016 total. [0]
  • Approximately 63 million Americans — 25% of the adult population — volunteer their time, talents, and energy to making a difference. [0]
  • The volunteer rate declined by 0.4% to 24.9% in 2016. [0]
  • Women volunteer at higher rates (27.8%) than men (21.8%). [0]
  • People aged 3544 and 45 54 are most likely to volunteer (28.9% and 28% respectively). [0]
  • while 20 24 year olds have the lowest rates (18.4%). [0]
  • 72% of volunteers are involved with only one organization, while 18.3% are involved with two. [0]
  • The top four national volunteer activities are food collection or distribution (24.2%), fundraising or selling items to raise money (23.9%), general labor or transportation (18.8%), and tutoring or teaching (17.9%). [0]
  • The top four volunteer areas are for religious (34.1%), educational (26%), social service (14.9%), and health (7.3%). [0]
  • 42.1% of people became volunteers with their main organization after being asked to volunteer. [0]
  • 49% of all church giving transactions are made with a card. [0]
  • 60% are willing to give to their church digitally. [0]
  • Tithers make up only 10 25 percent of a normal congregation. [0]
  • Churches that accept tithing online increase overall donations by 32%. [0]
  • Only 5% tithe, and 80% of Americans only give 2% of their income. [0]
  • Christians are giving at 2.5% of income; during the Great Depression it was 3.3%. [0]
  • Only 3 5% of Americans who give to their local church do so through regular tithing. [0]
  • When surveyed, 17% of Americans state that they regularly tithe. [0]
  • For families making $75k+, 1% of them gave at least 10% in tithing. [0]
  • 37% of regular church attendees and Evangelicals don’t give money to church. [0]
  • 17% of American families have reduced the amount that they give to their local church. [0]
  • 7% of church goers have dropped regular giving by 20% or more. [0]
  • 77% of those who tithe give 11%–20% or more of their income, far more than the baseline of 10%. [0]
  • 30% of annual giving occurs in December. [0]
  • 10% of annual giving occurs on the last 3 days of the year. [0]
  • 77% believe everyone can make a difference by supporting causes. [0]
  • 64% of donations are made by women. [0]
  • 40% of Millennial donors are enrolled in a monthly giving program. [0]
  • 16% give through Facebook fundraising tools. [0]
  • 11% of total US giving comes from Millennials. [0]
  • 84% of Millennials give to charity, donating an annual average of $481 across 3.3 organizations. [0]
  • 47% of Millennials gave through an organization’s website in 2016. [0]
  • 49% of Gen X donors are enrolled in a monthly giving program. [0]
  • 19% give through Facebook fundraising tools. [0]
  • Email prompted 31% of online donations made by Gen Xers 59% of Gen Zs are inspired to donate to charity by a message/image they saw on social media. [0]
  • represent 23.6% of the US populations. [0]
  • 49% of Baby Boomer donors are enrolled in a monthly giving program. [0]
  • 21% give through Facebook fundraising tools. [0]
  • 24% of Boomers say they were promoted to give an online donation because of direct mail they received. [0]
  • 72% of Boomers give to charity, donating an annual average of $1,212 across 4.5 organizations. [0]
  • is 11.8% of the US population. [0]
  • 30% of donors aged 75+ say they have given online in the last 12 months and on average give 25% more frequently than younger generations. [0]
  • 88% of the Greatest gen gives to charity, donating an annual average of $1,367 across 6.2 organizations. [0]
  • They represent 26% of total US giving Greatest prefer voice calls and direct mail. [0]
  • Corporate giving in 2017 increased to $20.77 billion—an 8.0% increase from 2016. [0]
  • 79% of companies reported increased donor participation rates and 73% raised more money. [0]
  • More than 49% of nonprofit respondents identified workplace giving as a growth strategy for their organization. [0]
  • 90% indicated that partnering with reputable nonprofit organizations enhances their brand and 89% believe partnering leverages their ability to improve the community. [0]
  • 80% of nonprofits in Snapshot 2014 said they have difficulty building strong corporate partnerships and workplace giving strategies with limited staff and resources. [0]
  • 73% of companies prefer to have deeper partnerships with a smaller number. [0]
  • An estimated $2 3 billion is donated through matching gift programs annually. [0]
  • Corporate matches of employee donations were 12% of total corporate cash contributions. [0]
  • An estimated $6 $10 billion in matching gift funds goes unclaimed per year. [0]
  • Nearly 60% of companies offer paid time off for employees to volunteer, and an additional 21% plan to offer release time in the next two years. [0]
  • An average of 30% of employees volunteer. [0]
  • 50% of employees volunteering is the minimum to be in the top quartile. [0]
  • In an analysis of over 30,000 individual volunteer activities, skillsbased volunteerism outperformed traditional volunteerism by 7 125% in all but one tracked benefit categories. [0]
  • 92% of surveyed corporate human resources executives agree that contributing business skills and expertise to a nonprofit can be an effective way to improve employees’ leadership and broader professional skill sets. [0]
  • 86% believe that employees expect them to provide opportunities to engage in the community and 87% believe their employees expect them to support causes and issues that matter to those employees. [0]
  • 82% of the survey respondents say employees want the opportunity to volunteer with peers in a corporate. [0]
  • 88% believe effective employee engagement programs help attract and retain employees. [0]
  • 77% of the respondents believe that offering employee engagement opportunities is an important recruitment strategy to attract millennials. [0]
  • The median employee participation rate for matching gift programs is 9%. [0]
  • Mentioning matching gifts in fundraising appeals results in a 71% increase in the response rate and a 51% increase in the average donation amount. [0]
  • 84% of survey participants revealed they’re more likely to donate if a match was offered. [0]
  • 12.3% of total corporate cash contributions went through corporate matching gift programs. [0]
  • Technology companies gave the highest proportion of matching gift contributions as a percentage of total cash gifts at 17.3%. [0]
  • 29% of corporate giving went to educationrelated causes — a combined percentage from K 12 and higher education. [0]
  • 25% of corporate giving went to health and social services programs. [0]
  • 15% of corporate giving went to the community and economic development programs. [0]
  • 85% of companies in the US have a formal domestic corporate giving program in place vs. only 45% with a formal international program. [0]
  • 78% of Americans wanting companies to address social justice issues. [0]
  • 88% of Millennials find their job more fulfilling when they have opportunities to make a positive impact on society and the environment. [0]
  • Purpose driven consumer companies achieved a compounded annual growth rate of 9.85% over five years, compared to just 2.4% for the whole S&P 500 Consumer Sector. [0]
  • Employees who engaged in corporate giving programs tended to have 75% longer tenures with the company. [0]
  • Overall revenue from online fundraising grew by 23% in 2017. [0]
  • Online giving grew 12.1% in 2017. [0]
  • 54% of donors worldwide prefer to give online with a credit or debit card.11% prefer direct mail.11% prefer cash.10% prefer bank/wire transfer.9% prefer Paypal.4% prefer mobile app/wallet.1% prefer text message. [0]
  • 67% of nonprofits across the globe are set up to accept online donations. [0]
  • On December 31%, online giving is concentrated between 12PM – 7PM. [0]
  • Overall online revenue increased by 23% in 2017, accelerating from 15% growth the previous year. [0]
  • Every sector tracked saw at least 15% online revenue growth, with particularly large gains for Environmental (34%) and Rights (37%). [0]
  • Nonprofits received an average of 28% more online gifts in 2017 than 2016. [0]
  • On average, 38% of donors who made an online gift to a nonprofit in 2016 made an online gift again to that nonprofit in 2017. [0]
  • Retention was 25% for donors who made their first gift in 2016, and 60% for repeat donors. [0]
  • Revenue from one time gifts increased by 19% in 2017. [0]
  • In one case study, a nonprofit used Custom Facebook Audiences to drive 63% more online donations. [0]
  • Revenue from monthly giving grew 23% compared to 13% growth for one. [0]
  • Pre selecting monthly giving on your donation page can increase conversions of monthly donations by up to 35%. [0]
  • Email messaging accounted for 26% of all online revenue. [0]
  • Chat Support increase audience engagement rates to drive 45% more opt. [0]
  • Only 3% of charities rate their board and executiveleadership as being digitally savvy. [0]
  • 66% of charities are worried they will miss out on opportunities for digital fundraising. [0]
  • Direct mail motivated 36% more donors to give online in 2016 compared to previous year. [0]
  • 51% of high wealth donors prefer to give online. [0]
  • 34% of nonprofits have paid for advertising on social media. [0]
  • 21% of donations are directly through social. [0]
  • Giving Tuesday raised $380 million dollars online, up 38% or $106 million from 2017. [0]
  • Facebook raised more than $125 million for charity on Giving Tuesday, up 178% or $80 million from 2017.Facebook and PayPal matched $7 million in donations to United States nonprofits Giving Tuesday. [0]
  • The largest Giving Tuesday payment processing platformsPayPal $98 million, up from $64 million (+53%). [0]
  • $62.6 million, up from $60.90 million (+2.80%). [0]
  • 46% of donors worldwide have not heard of #GivingTuesday. [0]
  • 17% of online donation form views were on a mobile device. [0]
  • Overall, 1.1% of website visitors made a donation, an increase of 18% over 2016. [0]
  • Website traffic declined slightly in 2017, with 1.4% fewer visitors per month. [0]
  • Mobile accounted for 40% of all visitors, tablets for 10%, and desktop users made up the other 50%. [0]
  • The share of mobile traffic increased by 9% from 2016, while the share of visitors using desktop or laptop computer declined by 4%. [0]
  • 45% of donors enrolled in a monthly giving program. [0]
  • Monthly giving revenue increased by 40% in 2017. [0]
  • Monthly giving accounted for 14% of all online revenue in 2016, and 16% of online revenue in 2017. [0]
  • Donors that set up recurring donations give 42% more annually, compared to one. [0]
  • 52% of Millennials are more likely to give monthly over a large one. [0]
  • 41% have donated to crowdfunding campaigns that benefit individuals. [0]
  • 16% of crowdfunders donate less money to NGS, NPOs, & charities due to their financial support of crowdfunding campaigns. [0]
  • 14% of donors worldwide have created an online peerto. [0]
  • 17% of crowdfunding donations are made on mobile devices. [0]
  • Campaigns that can gain 30% of their goal within the first week are more likely to succeed. [0]
  • Social Media is a critical factor in crowdfunding success for every order of magnitude increase in Facebook friends , the probability of success increases drastically (from 9% , 20%, to 40%). [0]
  • Individuals ages 24 35 are much more likely to participate in crowdfunding campaigns; those over 45 are significantly less likely to back campaigns. [0]
  • There’s an average of a 35% increase in giving when there’s a crowdfunding thermometer. [0]
  • 62% of donors who give to crowdfunding campaigns are new to crowdfunding. [0]
  • Crowdfunding campaigns get 126% more donations when owners update supporters. [0]
  • Crowdfunding campaigns with personal videos raise 150% than those that don’t have videos. [0]
  • 55% of people who engage with nonprofits on social media end up taking some sort of action. [0]
  • The most viewed brand videos are on average 31–60 seconds long (32% of all views). [0]
  • In 2015, 1849 year olds spent 4% less time watching TV while time on YouTube went up 74%. [0]
  • 28% of nonprofits are on Youtube. [0]
  • 57% of people who watch nonprofit videos go on to make a donation. [0]
  • 68% of nonprofit video watchers view similar videos within 30 days. [0]
  • 36% of online adults ages 18 29 are on the social network. [0]
  • 80% of active users access Twitter via mobile. [0]
  • 60% of consumers expect brands to respond to their query within the hour, but the average is 1 hour 24 minutes. [0]
  • 55% of people who engage with nonprofits on Twitter end up taking some sort of action. [0]
  • Twitter users send 700% more visitors to donation pages on Giving Tuesday than on a typical day. [0]
  • 77% of Twitter users feel more positive about a brand when their Tweet has been replied to. [0]
  • Companies using Twitter for customer service see a 19% lift in customer satisfaction. [0]
  • Tweets with images receive 18% more click throughs, 89% more likes, and 150% more retweets. [0]
  • About 1 in 5 churches use Twitter (21%). [0]
  • 44% of churches that have an average attendance of more than 250 use Twitter. [0]
  • 9% of those actively involved in church use Twitter. [0]
  • 59% of those people donate money. [0]
  • 52% donate clothing, food, or other personal items. [0]
  • 43% attend or participate in charitable events in their community because of social media. [0]
  • 25% contact their political representatives either by phone, letter, or email after engaging with a cause on social media. [0]
  • 15% organize their own events in their community afterward. [0]
  • 46.1% of churches say that using social media is their most effective method of outreach. [0]
  • 30% of nonprofits use Instagram to raise money and awareness. [0]
  • 75% of Instagram users take action, such as visiting a website or making a purchase after looking at an Instagram advertising post. [0]
  • 26% of Instagram users make more than $75,000 per year. [0]
  • 67% of Pinterest users are under the age of 40. [0]
  • 93% of Pinners shopped online in the past 6 months. [0]
  • Pins with prices get 36% more likes than those without. [0]
  • 87% of Pinners have purchased a product because of Pinterest. [0]
  • About 70% of Pinners are saving or clicking on Pins not just visiting. [0]
  • 18% of donors worldwide have given through Facebook fundraising tools. [0]
  • Of those, 88% say they are likely to give through Facebook fundraising tools in the future. [0]
  • Facebook refers 29.4% of traffic to donation pages on #GivingTuesday. [0]
  • More than 29% of mobile donation traffic on Giving Tuesday came from Facebook. [0]
  • In an average peertopeer fundraising campaign, 15 18% of donations are referred directly from Facebook. [0]
  • 84% of FaceBook users share to show their support for a cause and highlight issues that are important to them. [0]
  • On Thursdays and Fridays, engagement is 18% higher. [0]
  • By 2018, mobile devices will account for 57% of all Internet traffic. [0]
  • In the last year, the percentage of smartphone owners making mobile payments grew by 36%. [0]
  • 39% of smartphone owners indicated that they had used their phones to pay at least one bill in the past month, which equates to 53 million adult individuals. [0]
  • 25% of donors complete their donations on mobile devices. [0]
  • 44% of millennials said that would rather use their mobile phones than use cash to pay for small items. [0]
  • In the past year, mobile giving donations have increased 205%. [0]
  • 51% of people who visit a nonprofit’s website do so on a mobile device. [0]
  • Overall giving increased 4% last year. [0]
  • Faith based organizations saw the greatest increase in giving with an 18.1% increase in online donations. [0]
  • 64% of mobile donations come from women. [0]
  • Nearly three fourths of the entire population of the United States donates to charity in some form or another on a regular basis (69%). [0]
  • By incorporating mobile responsive design to their websites, nonprofits can increase their donations by 126% on average. [0]
  • An express checkout option on a website can increase mobile sales and donations by up to 55%. [0]
  • 30% of all annual giving occurs in December, and 10% of that happens within the last three days of the year. [0]
  • 84% of event fundraising pledges are fulfilled. [0]
  • 51% of mobile pledges came from call centers. [0]
  • 117% is the average mobile subscription rate. [0]
  • 54 % of nonprofit emails are read on mobile. [0]
  • 11% of Americans change their address each year. [0]
  • 90% of text message reminders are read in 3 minutes. [0]
  • More than 50% of the Textto Haiti donors made their donations shortly after learning about the campaign. [0]
  • Text donors are most likely to be between 49 and 59 years old, female, married, and college graduates. [0]
  • 91% of American adults own a smartphone. [0]
  • 41% of people still have a landline. [0]
  • Email messaging drove 28% of all online revenue in 2017. [0]
  • 68% of donors worldwide most trust websites & email addresses that use the .org domain extension. [0]
  • The Public Media sector received the lowest share of revenue from email (10%). [0]
  • In 2015, lists grew by 15%; in 2016, by 14%; in 2017, by 11%. [0]
  • Public Media nonprofits saw 41% growth in list size in 2017, while International was the only sector to experience a decline . [0]
  • Nonprofits sent an average of 66 email messages per subscriber in 2017, marking an 11% increase in volume from 2016. [0]
  • Advocacy email response rate declined by 9% in 2017, to 2.2%. [0]
  • Small drops were reported for open rate (down 1% to 15%), click through rate (down 1% to 2.5%), and page completion rate (down 4%, to 76%). [0]
  • The unsubscribe rate fell to 0.12%, 13% lower than in the previous year. [0]
  • Fundraising email response rate declined by 6% in 2017, to 0.06%. [0]
  • As with advocacy messages, small drops were reported for open rate (down 1% to 15%), click through rate (down 6% to 0.42%), and page completion rate (down 6%, to 16%). [0]
  • The unsubscribe rate fell to 0.18%, 3% lower than in the previous year. [0]
  • Walk/run/cycling event fundraisers who send more than 15 emails raise 76% more than non. [0]
  • 79% of fundraising emails do not personalize their “To” line with a first and last name. [0]
  • 90% visit website first before calling. [0]
  • 96% leave without making a purchase. [0]
  • Direct mail with digital ads yields 28% higher conversion rate. [0]
  • Marketing campaigns that used direct mail and 1 or more digital media experienced 118% lift in response rate compared to using direct mail only. [0]
  • Website visitors who are retargeted are 70% more likely to convert. [0]
  • 26% of customers will return to a site through retargeting. [0]
  • The volume of direct mail went down to 149.4 billion in 2016, but direct mail as a percentage of all mail went up. [0]
  • Direct mail response rates in 2016 were 5.3% for house file and 2.9% for prospect lists. [0]
  • At 6.6%, oversized envelopes have the greatest household response rates over other mediums (followed by postcards at 5.7% and letter sized envelopes at 4.3%). [0]
  • At 37%, oversized envelopes have the greatest household return on investment over other mediums (followed by postcards and letter sized envelopes at 29%). [0]
  • The top response rate tracking methods are online tracking such as PURLs (61%), call center or telephone (53%), and code or coupon (42%). [0]
  • Adding a person’s name and full color in the direct mail can increase response by 135%. [0]
  • Adding a person’s name, full color and more sophisticated database information can increase the response rate by up to 500% vs not doing any of these things. [0]
  • Targeting customers on a 11 level increases response rates up to 50% or more. [0]
  • 73% of firms aspire to be data driven but only 29% of firms succeed at turning data into action. [0]
  • 13% of emails are opened and read within five minutes. [0]
  • 17% of people who send their support from email are doing so on a mobile device. [0]
  • The open rate for nonprofit emails specifically is between 15% and 18% on average. [0]
  • Emails with social sharing options increase click through rates by 158%. [0]
  • has revealed a 30% uptick in searches from August to September related to charitable giving. [8]
  • 2. 12% of all giving happens in the last three days of the year. [8]
  • 64% of all donations are made by women. [8]
  • 72% of all charitable contributions are made by individuals; followed by foundations at 15%, bequests at 8%, and corporations 5%. [8]
  • 88% of dollars raised comes from 12% of an organization’s donors. [8]
  • 75% of Americans think they donate more than average. [8]
  • In reality, 72% contribute at a rate below the national average. [8]
  • 84% of Canadians donate to charity with an average individual donation of $446 per year. [8]
  • 53% of Asia Pacific citizens donate to charity, with those in Thailand (71%) more likely to do so and those in Japan the least likely (16%). [8]
  • 17% of crowdfunding donations are made on mobile devices. [8]
  • 65% of all social media activity occurs on a smartphone. [8]
  • 51% of people who visit your website do so on a mobile device. [8]
  • 33% — Percentage of nonprofits worldwide who are using a peerto. [9]
  • PeertoPeer Professional Forum 2020 Peerto Peer Fundraising Thirty) 33.9% — Decrease in fundraising by the top 30 U.S. programs in 2020 compared with the previous year. [9]
  • 14.7% — Percentage of 2019 peerto peer fundraising participants who returned to participate in the same event in 2020. [9]
  • That figure is down from 25.1% during the previous year. [9]
  • That number is up 83 percent from $227 per participant in 2019. [9]
  • That number is up 35 percent from $139 per participant in 2019. [9]
  • 54% — Percentage of participants who fundraised online in 2020 — up from 45% in 2019. [9]
  • The State of Modern Philanthropy 2019) 14% — Percentage of peerto peer fundraisers who become fundraisers again for the same organization. [9]
  • 18% — Average increase in the amount of money raised each year by returning P2P participants. [9]
  • The DonorDrive State of Fundraising Report) 80% — Share of P2P event participants who raise $0 for campaigns that do not require a minimum fundraising threshold. [9]
  • The DonorDrive State of Fundraising Report) 47% — Share of peerto peer fundraisers who send personal thank. [9]
  • 59% — Share of peertopeer fundraisers who reported accessing their participant page through mobile devices.53% — Share of peerto peer fundraisers who reported accessing their participant page through a desktop. [9]
  • 15% — Share of peerto peer fundraising participants who create Facebook Fundraisers. [9]
  • 30% — Share of online gifts that come through Facebook for peerto peer programs that register their events through Facebook Fundraisers. [9]
  • 40% — Share of peerto peer fundraising participants who used Facebook to solicit donations. [9]
  • — Share of all peertopeer fundraising campaigns that are classified as doit yourself . [9]
  • 46% — Average retention rate for DIY campaigns. [9]
  • Cycling participants are more likely to raise money — and become return participants — than those who participate in other traditional P2P campaigns. [9]
  • This figure is down 37 percent from $229 million in 2019. [9]
  • 58.9% — Decline in the number of donors who made contributions to participants in U.S. cycling events in 2020. [9]
  • Blackbaud Peerto Peer Fundraising Study) 46.8% — Percentage of cycling participants who self donate . [9]
  • 42.5% — Retention rate of cycling participants . [9]
  • 28% — Share of all peerto peer fundraising campaigns that are classified as cycling events. [9]
  • 26.1% — Percentage of endurance participants who self donate . [9]
  • 27.7% — Retention rate for endurance participants . [9]
  • This reflects a 5.1% increase from 2019.1 Corporate giving in 2020 decreased to $16.88 billion—a 6.1% decrease from 2019.1 Foundation giving in 2020 increased to $88.55 billion—a 19% increase from 2019.1. [10]
  • In 2020, the largest source of charitable giving came from individuals at $324.10 billion, or 69% of total giving. [10]
  • Other sources of charitable giving were giving by foundations ($88.55 billion/19% of the total share of American giving), bequests ($41.91 billion/9%), and corporations ($16.88 billion/4%). [10]
  • In 2020, the majority of charitable dollars went to religion (28%), education (15%), human services (14%), grantmaking foundations (12%). [10]
  • Giving in 2020 increased in nearly every sector, with doubledigit growth in gifts for public society benefit (15.7%), environment/animals (11.6%) and individuals (12.8%). [10]
  • Charitable giving accounted for 2.3% of gross domestic product in 2020.1. [10]
  • Adults are more likely to give to charity if their parents gave to charity.4. [10]
  • An estimated 25.1 percent of US adults volunteered in 2017, contributing an estimated 8.8 billion hours, valued at approximately $195.0 billion.5. [10]
  • Approximately 77 million Americans—30% of the adult population—volunteer their time, talents, and energy to making a difference.6. [10]
  • The top four national volunteer activities are fundraising or selling items to raise money (36.0%); food collection or distribution (34.2%); collecting, making or distributing clothing, crafts or other goods (26.5%); and mentoring youth (26.2%). [10]
  • The top four types of organizations by volunteering are religious (32.0%); sport, hobby, cultural or arts (25.7%); educational or youth service (19.2%); and civic, political, professional or international (6.2%). [10]
  • Only 14.7 percent of 2019 peerto peer fundraisers returned to participate in the same event in 2020. [11]
  • That’s down from a retention rate of 25.1 percent in 2019. [11]
  • This was dramatically borne out in 2020 when the average amount raised per participant rose 83 percent. [11]
  • But the Cadence Sports Million Dollar Club cycling survey shows just how much 78.3 percent for U.S. cycling programs in 2020. [11]
  • Charitable giving continued its upward trend in 2017, as an estimated $410.02 billion was given to charitable causes. [12]
  • Total giving to charitable organizations was $410.02 billion in 2017 (2.1% of GDP). [12]
  • This is an increase of 5.2% in current dollars and 3.0% in inflation adjusted dollars from 2016. [12]
  • Prior to the 40 year period 1977–2017, total giving was consistently at or above 2.0% of GDP. [12]
  • It fell below 2.0% throughout most of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. [12]
  • Total giving as a percentage of GDP rose to 2.0% and above through most of the 2000s, but then dropped to 1.9% in the years 2009 to 2011. [12]
  • Total giving as a percentage of GDP was 2.1% for four of the five years, 2013–2017. [12]
  • Specifically, individuals gave $286.65 billion, accounting for 70% of all giving and representing a 3.0% increase over 2016. [12]
  • Giving by bequest increased by 2.3% to $35.70 billion (9% of all donations). [12]
  • Foundations which includes grants made by independent, community, and operating foundations gave $66.9 billion (16% of all donations). [12]
  • This represents a 6% increase over the prior year. [12]
  • Corporations grew by 8% to $20.77 billion (5% of all donations). [12]
  • If you add in gifts from bequests, then the category accounts for nearly 80% of all giving. [12]
  • Giving to Education charities was up 6.2% to $58.9 billion (14% of all donations). [12]
  • Donations to Human Services charities were up 5.1% to $50.06 billion (12% of all donations). [12]
  • Foundations saw an increase of 6% to $45.89 billion (11% of all donations). [12]
  • Health charities experienced an increase of 15.5% to $38.27 billion (9% of all donations). [12]
  • Public Society Benefit charities saw an increase of 7.8% to $29.59 billion (7% of all donations). [12]
  • Giving to International charities decreased by 4.4% to $22.97 billion (6% of all donations). [12]
  • Arts, Culture and Humanities saw an increase of 8.7% to $19.51 billion (5% of all donations). [12]
  • Charities that focus on the Environment / Animals saw an increase of 7.2% to $11.83 billion (3% of all donations). [12]
  • With the 2.9% increase in donations this year, 31% of all donations, or $127.37 billion, went to Religious organizations. [12]
  • According to Giving USA, it was one of the “highest years ever” for charitable giving, with a total contribution amount sitting slightly below 2017’s record donations amount. [13]
  • Individual giving made up just under 70% of total giving, totaling $309.66 billion dollars!. [13]
  • That marks a 2.8% rise from the previous year when adjusted for inflation. [13]
  • Foundation giving is up 0.7% when adjusted for inflation. [13]
  • Corporate giving rose 11.4% when adjusted for inflation. [13]
  • Giving by bequest declined by 1.6% when adjusted for inflation. [13]
  • Compared to the year before, total giving rose 4.2%, even when adjusted for inflation. [13]
  • Online giving totaled $511 million on Giving Tuesday, marking a 28% increase in online donations from the previous year, reinforcing the value and necessity for high qualitydonation pagesand virtual giving options. [13]
  • 62% of donors preferred online giving methodsand 12% preferred PayPal as an online giving method. [13]
  • 57% of donorsare enrolled in some kind of recurring giving program. [13]
  • 35% of donors found email to be most inspiring to give, and 25% found social media most inspiring. [13]
  • 47% of donorssaid regular email interaction about their donation’s impact inspired them to give, 23% said social media about their donation’s impact inspired them. [13]
  • 77% of donors found Facebook and Instagram most inspiring. [13]
  • 50% donated directly through Facebook Fundraising tools, and “of those, 82% say they are likely to do it again.”. [13]
  • The recent Giving USA 2020 Second Quarter Report and theFundraising Effectiveness Projectfound giving “surged 12 percentage points in the second quarter,” overcoming the 6 percent first. [13]
  • In total,giving increased 7.5 percentin the first half of 2020 alone. [13]
  • The total number of donors in the first half of 2020 increased by 7.2 percent compared to the first half of 2019. [13]
  • Donor retention rate rose 1.8 percent overall, and both retained repeat donors and recaptured donors showed increases. [13]
  • 85% of donors expected their giving plans to hold steadyor increase in the second half of the year, per a July 2020 study. [13]
  • While all donations saw an increase,donations less than $250 increased the most(19.2%), the $250 to $999 range saw a modest increase of 8.1%, and the $1,000 and above saw the smallest increase (6.4%). [13]
  • Donor grantmaking was up 16%in the first four months of 2020 when compared to the same time period in 2019. [13]
  • Giving Tuesday saw a 25% increase in donations over the previous year and adonor participant increase of 29%. [13]
  • Mobile giving also outpaced desktop giving by almost 10%. [13]
  • We found that20% of donors are apt to donate money if they receive a free gift. [13]
  • The remaining majority (80%). [13]
  • In fact, 66% of that majority saw a free gift as a waste of money. [13]
  • Almost 70% of individuals who donate prefer an email expressing gratitude for their contribution. [13]
  • 49% of global online trafficis mobile internet traffic. [13]
  • Social media use hasincreased by 9.2% since 2019. [13]
  • 83.4% of internet users are on social media. [13]
  • 90.7% of mobile internet users are on social media. [13]
  • And 98.7% of social media users access websites or apps through a mobile device. [13]
  • According to the , 29% of people consider social media to be the communication tool that most inspires giving. [1]
  • 29% of online donors say thatsocial media is the communicationtool that most inspires them to give [email 27%, website, 18%, print, 12%, TV ad 6%] . [1]
  • Global Trends in Giving Report 87% of donors who first donate from a social referral source make their second donation from a social referral source . [1]
  • 71% of nonprofits worldwide agree that social media is effective for online fundraising. [1]
  • 34% of nonprofits worldwide have paid for social ads . [1]
  • Social Media drives 57% of traffic to fundraising campaign pages. [1]
  • 88% of donors who have given through Facebook Charitable Giving Tools say they are likely to do it again in the future . [1]
  • 25% post once daily on Facebook, 23% post once every other day, 19% post once weekly, 18% post twice or more daily, and 15% post less than once weekly . [1]
  • Facebook posts only reach an average of 4% of a nonprofit page’s fansM+R. [1]
  • The Engagement Score for an averageFacebook postis 0.31%. [1]
  • Video posts have the highest Engagement Score at 0.33%M+R. [1]
  • 41% of NGOs have used Facebook to report live from a special event or to showcase their organization’s work . [1]
  • 17% of nonprofits worldwide have participated in or hosted a Tweet Chat . [1]
  • 77% of nonprofits worldwide have a Twitter Profile. [1]
  • (Global NGO Technology Report 24% tweet two to five tweets daily, 21% less than one tweet weekly, 18% tweet once daily, 18% tweet one tweet every other day, 12% tweet once weekly, and 7% tweet five or more tweets daily. [1]
  • 50% of NGOs worldwide have an Instagram Profile. [1]
  • 30% share less than once weekly, 24% share once weekly, 21% share once every other day, 17% share once daily, and 8% share twice or more daily . [1]
  • 56% of NGO worldwide have a LinkedIn Page. [1]
  • 68% post less than once weekly, 15% post once weekly, 8% post once every other day, 6% post once daily, and 3% post twice or more daily . [1]
  • The most viewed brand videos are on average 31–60 seconds long (32% of all views). [1]
  • In 2015, 1849 year olds spent 4% less time watching TV while time on YouTube went up 74%. [1]
  • 28% of nonprofits are on Youtube. [1]
  • 57% of people who watch nonprofit videos go on to make a donation. [1]
  • 68% of nonprofit video watchers view similar videos within 30 days. [1]
  • 67% of Pinterest users are under the age of 40. [1]
  • 93% of Pinners shopped online in the past 6 months. [1]
  • Pins with prices get 36% more likes than those without. [1]
  • 87% of Pinners have purchased a product because of Pinterest. [1]
  • About 70% of Pinners are saving or clicking on Pins not just visiting. [1]
  • 55% of people who engage withnonprofits on social mediaend up taking some sort of action. [1]
  • 59% of those people donate money. [1]
  • 52% donate clothing, food, or other personal items. [1]
  • 43% attend or participate in charitableevents in their community because of social media. [1]
  • 25% contact their political representatives either by phone, letter, or email after engaging with a cause on social media. [1]
  • 15% organize their own events in their community afterward. [1]
  • 46.1% of churches say that usingsocial mediais their most effective method of outreach. [1]
  • In fact, Americans gave a record $471 billion to charities in 2020, according to Giving USA. [14]
  • This was a 5.1% increase in total giving over 2019. [14]
  • However, adjusted for inflation, it was only 3.8% more than 2019. [14]
  • Only a fraction (20%). [14]
  • 2020 saw a huge 20% increase in online giving. [14]
  • Moms aged 35 44 were last year’s top volunteer group Over 80% of all donations to charities and nonprofit organizations in the US come from individuals. [14]
  • Six out of ten (or 60%). [14]
  • The average annual charity donation for Americans in 2020 was $737, according to Giving USA. [14]
  • Donors that set up some sort of recurring monthly donation give 42% more than one. [14]
  • Psychologists who study why and how we buy have determined that using prices ending in the numbers 4, 7, and 9 are more likely to be successful than prices ending in 0 or 5. [14]
  • The chart below, from the Tax Policy Center, shows us two surprising things Those makingless than $50,000 annuallyare the second highest givers in terms of percentage of income. [14]
  • 84% of millennials give to charity and nonprofits. [14]
  • The average charity or nonprofit will have Millennials making up 5 to 10% of its donors. [14]
  • Over 40% who give do so with a monthly deduction to their credit or debit card. [14]
  • The average Gen X donation totals $732, with 59% of Generation X being regular donors. [14]
  • That’s nearly three fourths – 72% – of the entire Baby Boomer Generation, accounting for 43% of all donations made each year. [14]
  • While they make up only 11% of the US population, they account for 26% of all giving. [14]
  • The pandemic increased giving to local human and social services organizations by 12%, and faith based giving grew by 3%. [14]
  • That said, 32% of all donations made in the US are to a local place of worship or a faith. [14]
  • However, 37% of the weekly “faithful” don’t give anything at all. [14]
  • According to NonProfit Source, only 5% of congregants give regularly. [14]
  • The average weekly church donation is down nearly 1% from the Great Depression. [14]
  • Christians during the 1930s gave 3.3% of their total income. [14]
  • Today’s faithful have dropped that to 2.5%. [14]
  • Interestingly enough, 75% of nonreligious, nonaffiliated Americans give to charities, many of them faith. [14]
  • A recent study by The Philanthropy Roundtable found that 57% of all the “good works” being done in American communities have no affiliation with or participation by religious groups at all. [14]
  • And while religious giving has remained steady at right around the 30% mark for several years now, future trends may not hold. [14]
  • Religious affiliation and regular attendance are dropping, with just 36% of American adults claiming weekly worship. [14]
  • That’s 30% of the adult population. [14]
  • The average volunteer hours per week of American volunteers is 3.5 hours, according to Americorps, for an estimated total of $255 billion in unpaid labor and services. [14]
  • Corporate donations to nonprofits totaled $24.8 billion in 2020, a decrease of 6%, according to Giving USA’s report. [14]
  • Pfizer was America’s most charitable corporation in 2020, as reported by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. [14]
  • In 2020, school fundraising fell 4.6% for K 12 schools according to Giving USA. [14]
  • Online revenue from online giving grew 20% in 2020 —. [14]
  • Every sector saw at least a 15% increase over previous years as the charitable giving growth rate increased by 20%. [14]
  • Crowdfunding stats for nonprofits show that crowdfunding success rates largely depend on four things Social media sharing– the rate of success rises with every social media contact – 10 friends increase 9%, 100 friends increase success by 20%, etc. [14]
  • Regular updates for supporters– updates every 5 days result in 3X more donations Videos– campaigns with video appeals raise 150% more than those without. [14]
  • Available to download in PNG, PDF, XLS format 33% off until Jun 30th. [15]

I know you want to use Fundraising Software, thus we made this list of best Fundraising Software. We also wrote about how to learn Fundraising Software and how to install Fundraising Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Fundraising Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Fundraising statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. nonprofitssource – https://nonprofitssource.com/online-giving-statistics/.
  2. empower – https://empower.agency/social-media-stats-charities-nonprofits/.
  3. doublethedonation – https://doublethedonation.com/tips/matching-grant-resources/nonprofit-fundraising-statistics/.
  4. qgiv – https://www.qgiv.com/blog/fundraising-statistics/.
  5. 360matchpro – https://360matchpro.com/fundraising-statistics/.
  6. sharpenet – https://sharpenet.com/interesting-fundraising-statistics-everyone-should-know/.
  7. neonone – https://neonone.com/resources/blog/year-end-giving-statistics/.
  8. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/fundraisers.htm.
  9. nptechforgood – https://www.nptechforgood.com/2015/09/16/20-must-know-fundraising-and-social-media-stats/.
  10. peertopeerforum – https://www.peertopeerforum.com/fundraising-guides/peer-to-peer-fundraising-data/.
  11. nptrust – https://www.nptrust.org/philanthropic-resources/charitable-giving-statistics/.
  12. forbes – https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidhessekiel/2021/06/17/what-new-peer-to-peer-fundraising-stats-mean-for-nonprofits/.
  13. charitynavigator – https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=content.view&cpid=42.
  14. soapboxengage – https://www.soapboxengage.com/blog/1956-2019-and-2020-giving-statistics-to-improve-your-fundraising-strategy.
  15. definefinancial – https://www.definefinancial.com/blog/charitable-giving-statistics/.
  16. statista – https://www.statista.com/statistics/1024166/malaysia-value-of-fund-raised-through-secondary-fundraising/.

How Useful is Fundraising

One of the core advantages of fundraising lies in its ability to raise awareness. By organizing events, campaigns, or social media drives, fundraising brings attention to multiple causes that often go unnoticed. It serves as a powerful medium to propagate vital information and engage the public in the matters that truly require our attention. Whether it’s combating poverty, championing environmental protection, or supporting medical advancements, fundraising acts as a catalyst, generating discussion and igniting change within individuals and society as a whole.

Moreover, fundraising provides a gateway for those who wish to make a difference but lack the means or resources to do so individually. It empowers people to contribute to causes they believe in collectively, pooling their efforts and funds alongside others who share the same passion. In this way, fundraising breaks down the barriers that may often inhibit individual action, allowing diverse groups to come together and effect substantial change.

Furthermore, the act of fundraising can cultivate a sense of community and solidarity. Call it the “ripple effect” – when individuals actively participate in fundraising activities, they find themselves more inclined to immerse in their communities and connect with like-minded individuals. This sense of togetherness strengthens both the fabric of our social networks and our commitment to uphold the causes we care about. Fundraising events and projects can serve as vehicles for establishing bonds, fostering empathy, and developing a shared ethos among people from different backgrounds, uniting them in their pursuit of a common goal.

Fundraising also provides organizations and institutions with the financial means to execute important missions. Given the economic constraints faced by many initiatives, external funding becomes indispensable. Grants, sponsorships, and individual donations generated through fundraising initiatives form the backbone of organizations striving to address pressing social concerns. Whether it is education, healthcare, disaster relief, or support for marginalized communities, fundraising doesn’t simply serve as a mode of generating revenue; it represents a lifeline that ensures these important projects can move forward.

Lastly, fundraising sparks creativity and innovation as organizations come up with inventive ways to capture the public’s attention and encourage participation. From charity runs and concerts to unique challenges and online crowdfunding platforms, fundraising motivates individuals to think outside the box to inspire more significant impact. These initiatives not only raise funds but foster a sense of excitement and engagement, attracting a broader audience and mobilizing them towards a shared cause.

To conclude, it is undeniable that fundraising plays an invaluable role in society, offering a multitude of benefits that go beyond monetary contributions. From raising awareness, cultivating community engagement, and fostering innovation, its impact transcends mere financial figures. By bringing together individuals, organizations, and communities, fundraising enables us to tackle societal challenges and embody the change we wish to see in the world.

In Conclusion

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We tried our best to provide all the Fundraising statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Fundraising statistics.




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