Home Health Care Statistics 2023 - Everything You Need to Know


Are you looking to add Home Health Care to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Home Health Care statistics of 2023.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Home Health Care stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Home Health Care statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Home Health Care have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Home Health Care? We will answer all your Home Health Care related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Home Health Care Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 76 Home Health Care Statistics on this page 🙂

Home Health Care Benefits Statistics

  • Lost income and benefits over a caregiver’s lifetime is estimated to range from a total of $283,716 for men to $324,044 for women, or an average of $303,880. [0]
  • [Updated February 2015] Lost income and benefits over a caregiver’s lifetime is estimated to range from a total of $283,716 for men to $324,044 for women, or an average of $303,880. [0]

Home Health Care Market Statistics

  • The median pay was $25,280 per year and the market is expected to grow at a rate of 34%. [1]

Home Health Care Latest Statistics

  • Employment of home health and personal care aides is projected to grow 33 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. [2]
  • Proportion of agencies with for profit ownership 80.6% Source. [3]
  • Healthcare Occupations PRINTER FRIENDLY Employment in healthcare occupations is projected to grow 16 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations, adding about 2.6 million new jobs. [4]
  • Most of those receiving home care in the U.S. are over 65 years old , with approximately 97 percent requiring assistance with bathing and 91 percent requiring assistance transferring in and out of bed. [5]
  • As of 2017, it was estimated that 38 percent of home care workers were white , while 28 percent were Black or African American and 23 percent Hispanic or Latino. [5]
  • Over half of home care workers have a high school degree or less while 20 percent have an associates’s degree or higher. [5]
  • Almost all home health agencies are Medicare certified , while 78 percent are Medicaid certified. [5]
  • In 2015, the home health care services industry reported revenue of over 74 billion dollars, around 70 percent of which came from public programs , mostly Medicare and Medicaid. [5]
  • About 70 % of those using home healthcare services are age 65 and older. [1]
  • A majority, 80 %, of those over age 60, choose to live independently, in comfort and with an enhanced quality of life.2. [1]
  • 3.4M Caregivers 34% job growth rate. [1]
  • Typical reimbursement is for “episodes of care” up to 60 days, but there are also some reimbursements for chronic disease care that is likely to be more ongoing. [1]
  • 2020 Revenue estimated at $8.6B Hospice Care / Home Hospice and Palliative Care. [1]
  • Attempts at population health are generally targeted towards the top 1 percent of the population (who account for 20% of medical spending). [1]
  • Actually, a surprising statistic shows that of those receiving home care services, 44 percent simply received help and assistance with activities of daily living and personal care. [6]
  • True enough, when it comes to home care patients, 70 percent are over the age of 65. [6]
  • More than 65 million people, or 29 percent of the U.S. population, provide care for a chronically ill or disabled senior loved one each year, spending an average of 20 hours per week with the consumer. [6]
  • According to The Home Care Benchmarking Study by Home Care Pulse, based on the number of new providers who have started businesses, the industry has grown 44% in the last 5 years. [7]
  • Through the fund, providers can expect reimbursement of up to 88% of revenue loss—a muchneeded jump start to the high. [7]
  • In support of this statement, a survey conducted by Transcend Strategy found that “65% of respondents said COVID 19 completely changed their opinions about the best way to care for aging seniors.”. [7]
  • The survey concluded that “67% plan to use inhome care as a substitute for in facility care even after the pandemic.”. [7]
  • According to Modern Healthcare, “As many as 66% of nursing homes say they could close in 2021 due to COVID. [7]
  • But in the interim, likely to last the length of 2021, home care services will have the opportunity to fill the void. [7]
  • ResultsRates of unmet need for training varied by activity, from 8.2% of family caregivers assisting with household chores to 16.0% assisting with self. [8]
  • Surveyors polled 18 percent of home health care providers, resulting in 4,195 completed surveys. [9]
  • Surveyors polled 23 percent of adult day health care facilities, resulting in 908 completed surveys. [9]
  • Surveyors polled 14 percent of licensed assisted living facilities, resulting in 6,183 completed surveys. [9]
  • Surveyors polled 23 percent of certified and licensed nursing homes, resulting in 3,412 completed surveys. [9]
  • Since the inception of the survey, Genworth has followed industry guidance with representing 44 hours as the estimated number of hours per week for professional inhome caregivers. [9]
  • Women Hold 76% of All Health Care Jobs, Gaining in Higher. [10]
  • Women have driven 80% of the overall growth in the booming health care field since the turn of the century. [10]
  • In some health care occupations, such as nurse midwives, speech pathologists, dental assistants and medical assistants, women account for at least 90% of workers. [10]
  • Women make up more than 85% of workers in both of these large occupations. [10]
  • The 2019 American Community Survey estimated 698,316 civilians 16 years and over were employed as “Other physicians.”. [10]
  • The 2019 American Community Survey estimated 2,523,490 registered nurses in the United States. [10]
  • According to the 2019 American Community Survey, there were 264,002 women physicians. [10]
  • An estimated 12 million Americans needed long term care in 2007. [0]
  • [Updated February 2015] An estimated 12 million Americans needed long term care in 2007. [0]
  • Approximately 63% are persons aged 65 and older ; the remaining 37% are 64 years of age and younger. [0]
  • The lifetime probability of becoming disabled in at least two activities of daily living or of being cognitively impaired is 68% for people age 65 and older. [0]
  • By 2050, the number of individuals using paid long term care services in any setting will likely double from the 13 million using services in 2000, to 27 million people. [0]
  • Of the older population with longterm care needs in the community, about 30% have substantial long term care needs. [0]
  • Of these, about 25% are 85 and older and 70% report they are in fair to poor health. [0]
  • In 2012, 14.8% of the 65+ population were reported to be below the poverty level. [0]
  • Among the population aged 65+, 69% will develop disabilities before they die, and 35% will eventually enter a nursing home. [0]
  • In 2002, the percentage of older persons with moderate or severe memory impairment ranged from about 5% among persons aged 65–69 to about 32% among persons aged 85 or older. [0]
  • In 2012, there are an estimated 5.9 million people 85+ in the United States. [0]
  • Two out of three (66%). [0]
  • Another quarter (26%). [0]
  • Two out of three (66%). [0]
  • The use of informal care as the only type of assistance by older Americans aged 65 and over increased from 57% in 1994 to 66% in 1999. [0]
  • The growth in reliance upon informal care between 1994 and 1999 is accompanied by a decline in the use of a combination of informal and formal care from 36% in 1994 to 26% in 1999. [0]
  • The vast majority80% of elderly people receiving assistance, including many with several functional limitations, live in private homes in the community, not in institutions. [0]
  • The proportion of Americans aged 65 and over with disabilities who rely entirely on formal care for their personal assistance needs has increased to 9% in 1999 from 5% in 1984. [0]
  • Institutionalization is much more common at older ages; in 2010, about one in eight people age 85 or older resided in institutions, compared with 1 percent of people ages 65 to 74. [0]
  • [Updated February 2015] Institutionalization is much more common at older ages; in 2010, about one in eight people age 85 or older resided in institutions, compared with 1 percent of people ages 65 to 74. [0]
  • In 2012, there were 1.4 million people in nursing homes nationally Between 2002 and 2012, private pay prices for a private or semiprivate room in a nursing home grew by an average of 4.0 percent and 4.5 percent, respectively, per year. [0]
  • [Updated February 2015] Between 2002 and 2012, private pay prices for a private or semiprivate room in a nursing home grew by an average of 4.0 percent and 4.5 percent, respectively, per year. [0]
  • Of the population aged 65 and over in 1999, 52% of the nursing home population was aged 85 or older compared to 35% aged 75–84, and 13% aged 65–74. [0]
  • Of the population aged 65 and over in 1999, 52% of the nursing home population was aged 85 or older compared to 35% aged 75–84, and 13% aged. [0]
  • In 2012, total spending for long term care was $219.9 billion, or 9.3% 42. [0]
  • In 2012, total spending for long term care was $219.9 billion, or 9.3%. [0]
  • In 2010, approximately 45% 43 [Updated February 2015]. [0]
  • In 2010, approximately 45% Caregiver services were valued at $450 billion per year in 2009 up from $375 billion in year 2007. [0]
  • Despite the trend toward communitybased care as opposed to institutionalized care, only 18.2% of longterm care expenditures for the elderly are for community. [0]
  • This figure has increased at a 25% rate annually since 1990. [0]
  • 31.9% of the annual estimated home care expenditures were paid for by Medicare in 2003, a little over 18% were paid for outof pocket or by private insurance, and approximately 13% were covered by Medicaid. [0]
  • 50 31.9% of the annual estimated home care expenditures were paid for by Medicare in 2003, a little over 18% were paid for outof pocket or by private insurance, and approximately 13% were covered by Medicaid. [0]
  • Only 7% of residents receive Medicaid coverage for assisted living. [0]
  • Over two thirds of the current health care dollar goes to treating chronic illness; for older persons the proportion rises to almost 95%. [0]
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [1], pediatric vaccine orders and administration saw a significant decline at the start of the COVID 19 pandemic in 2020. [11]
  • According to Yale Medicine[1], e cigarette and vaping associated lung illness is defined as a significant medical condition in which a patient’s lungs become injured from ingredients […]. [11]
  • Employment of home health and personal care aides is projected to grow 33 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. [12]

I know you want to use Home Health Care Software, thus we made this list of best Home Health Care Software. We also wrote about how to learn Home Health Care Software and how to install Home Health Care Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Home Health Care Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Home Health Care statistics of 2023.

Reference


  1. caregiver – https://www.caregiver.org/resource/selected-long-term-care-statistics/.
  2. ankota – https://www.ankota.com/home-care-industry-overview-and-statistics.
  3. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home-health-aides-and-personal-care-aides.htm.
  4. cdc – https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/home-health-care.htm.
  5. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home.htm.
  6. statista – https://www.statista.com/topics/4049/home-care-in-the-us/.
  7. 1800homecare – https://www.1800homecare.com/home-care-stats/5-statistics/.
  8. axiscare – https://axiscare.com/encouraging-home-care-statistics-for-2021/.
  9. nih – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33772759/.
  10. genworth – https://www.genworth.com/aging-and-you/finances/cost-of-care.html.
  11. census – https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2019/08/your-health-care-in-womens-hands.html.
  12. utah – https://stats.health.utah.gov/.
  13. bls – https://stats.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home-health-aides-and-personal-care-aides.htm.

In Conclusion

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We tried our best to provide all the Home Health Care statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Home Health Care statistics.

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