Jail Management Statistics 2022 - Everything You Need to Know


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  • In addition, it is estimated that more than 80,000 youth are held in juvenile detention facilities on any given day. [0]
  • Overall, more than 30% of the needs fell under the theme of leadership and organizational issues. [1]
  • As Likely As Other Released Prisoners To Be Re Arrested For A Sex Offense. [2]
  • U.S. Adult Incarceration Rate Declines 13% in 8 Years. [2]
  • Gallup Poll U.S. Death Penalty Support at 60%. [2]
  • “Based on our random sample, GAO estimates that the criminal aliens had an average of 7 arrests, 65 percent were arrested at least once for an immigration offense, and about 50 percent were arrested at least once for a drug offense. [2]
  • Immigration, drugs, and traffic violations accounted for about 50 percent of arrest offenses. [2]
  • About 90 percent of the criminal aliens sentenced in federal court in fiscal year 2009 were convicted of immigration and drug. [2]
  • About 40 percent of individuals convicted as a result of DOJ terrorism related investigations were aliens.”. [2]
  • Correctional health care spending rose 13%. [2]
  • Due to the decrease in prison populations, per inmate costs increased 10%. [2]
  • The total prison population is at a comparable level (less than 1% increase). [3]
  • The number of first receptions represents a fall of 6% compared to 2018. [3]
  • This is 10% lower than in 2018. [3]
  • This is a rise of 3% compared to 2018, driven by increases in the number of offences for ‘violence’. [3]
  • Additional days were awarded as punishment on 19,685 occasions – this is 12% lower than in 2018. [3]
  • This is a 6% increase on the same quarter in 2018, driven by increases in recalls from determinate sentences of more than 12 months. [3]
  • This number has decreased by 3% compared to the number supervised as at 31 December 2018. [3]
  • The sentenced prison population stood at 72,187 (87% of the prison population); the remand prison population stood at 10,043 (12%) and the non criminal prison population stood at 760 (1%). [3]
  • The remand population was 12% higher than the same point 12 months earlier. [3]
  • The number of males and females in custody on remand increased by 12% and 8% respectively. [3]
  • More than half (59%) of those in custody on remand were being held for either Violence against the person (24% of the remand population), Drug offences (21%) or Theft Offences (14%). [3]
  • The sentenced population has decreased by 1% in the year leading up to 31 March 2020. [3]
  • However, there is evidence that this trend is levelling off, as there was a 4% decrease in the sentenced sexual offender population in the 12 months to 31 March 2020. [3]
  • As at 31 March 2020 there were 12,774 prisoners serving sentences for sexual offences, which represented 18% of the sentenced prison population. [3]
  • The number of those serving sentences for a ‘Violence against the person’ offence increased by 4% compared to the same time last year. [3]
  • On 31 March 2020, 5,793 prisoners were serving such sentences; a 10% increase compared to the same time last year. [3]
  • This represents an annual decrease of 4%. [3]
  • There were 2,039 IPP prisoners as at 31 March 2020 which represents a decrease of 15% in the last 12 months. [3]
  • This figure has decreased since the June 2012 peak of 6,080, however the number of IPP prisoners who have been recalled to custody continues to increase; in the past year the recalled IPP population has grown by 25%. [3]
  • The proportion of the IPP population who are posttariff continues to increase; 94% of IPP prisoners were post tariff as of 31 March 2020 compared to 91% at the same time the previous year. [3]
  • The prison population who have been recalled to custody increased by 24% over the year leading up to 31 March 2020. [3]
  • 692 noncriminal) foreign nationals held in custody and the HMPPS operated Immigration Removal Centre as at 31 March 2020; representing 11% of the total prison population. [3]
  • The number of FNOs in the prison population has increased by 2% compared to 31 March 2019. [3]
  • The most common nationalities after British Nationals in prisons are Albanian (11% of the FNO prison population), Polish (9%), Romanian (9%), Irish (8%) and Jamaican (5%). [3]
  • This is 6% fewer than in 2018, and 43% fewer than in 2009. [3]
  • Over the last 10 years the number of annual first prison receptions has fallen by 43%, to around 72,000 in 2019. [3]
  • Around 1 in 7 (15%). [3]
  • Five nationalities accounted for half (50%). [3]
  • In 2019, there were 29,570 ‘untried’ prison admissions ; this is 5% lower than in 2018 and represents the lowest number since the start of the time series in 1990. [3]
  • Though this represents a 1% rise compared to 2018, it is still around the lowest level since 1990. [3]
  • There were 54,501 sentenced admissions to prison in 2019 (8% lower than in 2018). [3]
  • Around half (46%). [3]
  • sentenced admissions for ‘Sexual offences’ (24% decrease) and ‘Fraud offences’ (20% decrease), however there were notable yearon year increases for the offence groups of ‘Criminal damage and arson’ (11% increase), and ‘Possession of weapons’ (9% increase). [3]
  • During 2019, there were 25,040 recall admissions to custody, this is an increase of 10% compared to 2018. [3]
  • ‘3 in 5’ (62%) recall admissions in 2019 were for those recalled from determinate sentences of ‘12 months or more’, whereas fewer than 1,000 (4%). [3]
  • The number of first receptions between October and December 2019 was 5% lower than the same period in 2018. [3]
  • Compared to Oct Dec 2018, there were increases in remand admissions in the latest quarter (‘untried’ admissions increased by 2%, and ‘convicted unsentenced’ admissions increased by 3%). [3]
  • However, there was a 10% fall in the number of sentenced admissions compared with the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • Recall admissions continued to increase in the latest quarter (a 7% increase; to 6,365). [3]
  • Of which, the number of recall admissions from determinate sentences increased by 7% and those from indeterminate sentences increased by 14%. [3]
  • In 2019, a total of 62,019 offenders were released from determinate sentences, a fall of 10% from 2018. [3]
  • The number of males released from determinate sentences fell by 9% between 2018 and 2019, whereas the number of females released decreased by 12%. [3]
  • 752 offenders were released from indeterminate sentences in 2019; a 20% decrease compared to 2018. [3]
  • Of the indeterminate releases during 2019, 377 were from IPP sentences (down 25% compared to 2018) and 375 from life sentences (a decrease of 13% from 2018). [3]
  • There were 7% fewer releases during the quarter ending December 2019 compared to the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • There were large decreases in the number of releases from short sentences but an increase (7%). [3]
  • There were 175 releases from indeterminate sentences between October and December 2019, a 19% decrease from the same period in 2018. [3]
  • The number of IPP and life releases fell by 16% and 23% respectively. [3]
  • 3,156 offenders were released on HDC during the latest quarter – this represents a fall of 12% compared to the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • This fall in the number released on HDC reflects the reduction in the size of the pool of offenders eligible for HDC (3% lower than the same period in 2018). [3]
  • There were 119,069 incidences of ROTL during the quarter ending December 2019, which is a 21% increase on the same quarter last year. [3]
  • 5,280 individuals were given at least one incidence of ROTL between October and December 2019 an increase of 23% compared to the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • There was a total of 21,666 recorded incidences of prisoner transfer during the latest quarter (1% decrease from last year). [3]
  • The majority of these (71%). [3]
  • 64% of all adjudications were proven. [3]
  • During 2019 there were 210,326 adjudications – this is a rise of 3% compared to 2018. [3]
  • Of these, proven adjudications increased from 132,538 to 133,838 (1% increase). [3]
  • The total number of proven adjudications for ‘violence’ offences increased from 18,810 to 20,965 , a rise of 11% and a continuing increasing trend. [3]
  • This was counterbalanced by a fall in the number of proven adjudications for ‘unauthorised transactions’ and ‘disobedience/disrespect’; down 2% and 1% respectively. [3]
  • During 2019 there were 28,817 adjudications heard by an Independent Adjudicator, which represents an 8% fall compared to 2018. [3]
  • Despite this, the proportion of adjudications for ‘violence’ has remained fairly stable over recent years, fluctuating between 14% and 17% of all adjudication cases in each year since 2013. [3]
  • This is a decrease of 7% on the same quarter in the previous year. [3]
  • 63% of all adjudications were proven. [3]
  • Around a third (31%) of proven adjudications were for offences of unauthorised transactions, closely followed by disobedience and disrespect (30%). [3]
  • The number of proven adjudications for ‘unauthorised transactions’ and ‘disobedience/disrespect’ fell by 12% and 11% respectively on the same quarter of the previous year. [3]
  • The number of proven offences for violence has decreased slightly by 1%. [3]
  • There was an 8% decrease in the number of proven adjudications from the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • This resulted in a 9% fall in the number of punishments. [3]
  • Additional days were awarded as punishment on 4,591 occasions between October and December 2019; this is 21% lower than the same period in 2018. [3]
  • A total of 78,908 days was awarded in the latest quarter – this represents a decrease of 20% from the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • The total number of recalls increased by 6% compared to the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • Although the number of recalls increased by 6% from the same quarter a year ago, it represents a decrease of 3% from the previous quarter. [3]
  • Between October and December 2019, there were 4,455 offenders recalled from a sentence over 12 months, an increase of 9% in comparison to the same quarter in the previous year. [3]
  • This represents a 3% decrease compared to the end of December 2018 and an increase of 3% compared to December 2009. [3]
  • However, at the end of December 2019, the total probation caseload stood at 247,759 which represents 3% decrease compared to 31 December 2018 and a 14% increase since 2014. [3]
  • The number of offenders supervised before or after release from prison has increased by 34% since 2014 to 146,786 at the end of December 2019. [3]
  • In comparison to the previous year, that number decreased by 2%; those supervised under post release alone decreased by 4% over the same period. [3]
  • The total court order caseload decreased by 22% between 2009 and 2014 to 109,353 and then increased in 2016 by 14% to 124,643. [3]
  • However, it has decreased in recent years to 106,234 at the end of December 2019; this represents a 5% decline compared to the previous year. [3]
  • Following a 27% decrease in the number of offenders on a Community Order from 2009 to 2014, the number increased in 2016 before decreasing to 67,809 at the end of December 2019; this represents a 2% decline in comparison to the previous year. [3]
  • Similarly, those on a Suspended Sentence Order with requirements decreased from 2009 to 2013 by 12% to 38,227 before increasing in 2016 to 49,541. [3]
  • The number subsequently decreased again to stand at 39,083 at the end of December 2019, which represents a 9% decrease in comparison to the previous year. [3]
  • As a result of ORA being implemented in February 2015, as explained previously, the number of offenders starting pre release supervision in custody increased by 81% from 45,063 in 2014 to 81,523 in 2019. [3]
  • The total number of pre sentence reports prepared by the Probation Service decreased by 53% between 2009 and 2019 to 103,004. [3]
  • In the year ending September 2009, the number of offenders given sentences for community sentences, SSOs and custodial sentences decreased by 55%, 10% and 24% respectively compared to the year ending September 2019[footnote. [3]
  • During the quarter October to December 2019, 17,976 offenders started COs, representing a decrease of 11% compared to the same quarter in the previous year. [3]
  • The number of offenders who started SSOs with requirements remained at a similar level of 7,631 between October and December 2019, whilst those starting pre release supervision decreased by 11% over the same period. [3]
  • Overall, 27,839 requirements were started under COs between October to December 2019, with unpaid work, drug treatments and accredited programmes decreasing by 11% to 8,771, 16% to 1,121 and 7% to 2,023 respectively since the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • Between October to December 2019, 13,218 requirements were started under SSOs, with unpaid work and accredited programmes increasing by 5% to 3,791 and 4% to 1,289 respectively since the same period in the previous year. [3]
  • Under SSOs, accredited programmes combined with rehabilitation and unpaid work saw the largest increase at 28% to 367, whilst rehabilitation and unpaid work and rehabilitation combined with curfew increased by 7% to 1,457 and 14% to 370 respectively. [3]
  • Of court orders terminated from October to December 2019, 70% of 18,576 COs and 75% of 7,526 SSOs were terminated successfully, i.e. ran their full course or were terminated early for good progress. [3]
  • In the quarter October to December 2019, there was a 13% decrease in the number of PSRs prepared by the Probation Service compared to the same quarter in 2018. [3]
  • Eighty nine per cent of immediate custodial sentences proposed in PSRs resulted in that sentence being given in the year ending December 2019. [3]
  • Overall employment of correctional officers and bailiffs is projected to decline 7 percent from 2020 to 2030. [4]
  • Of these, ICE has resources to monitor approximately 5 percent of the total non detained population, or approximately 100,000 undocumented individuals. [5]
  • Sexual recidivism rates range from 5 percent after three years to 24 percent after 15 years. [6]
  • Research has shown that sex offenders are more likely to recidivate with a nonsexual offense than a sexual offense. [6]
  • More recently, Tjaden and Thoennes found that only 19 percent of women and 13 percent of men who were raped since their 18th birthday reported the rape to the police. [6]
  • Grotpeter and Elliot found that only 2.5 percent of sexual assaults and 10 percent of serious sexual assaults resulted in an arrest and Snyder found that an arrest was made in only 29 percent of reported juvenile sexual assaults. [6]
  • Simons, Heil and English found that only 5 percent of rapes and child sexual assaults self reported during prison treatment were identified in official records. [6]
  • Likewise, another study found that only 1 percent of contact and noncontact sexual offenses self reported during treatment were identified in official records. [6]
  • Because offenders released from prison typically have a more serious criminal history than probationers, and criminal history is related to recidivism, recidivism rates are likely to be higher for prison releasees than for probationers. [6]
  • This reduced the sample size by more than 17 percent, all of whom would have been calculated as “nonrecidivists” in traditional studies. [6]
  • The oneand five year recidivism rates found by the researchers were, respectively 3.9 percent and 10.8 percent for a sex crime rearrest, 26.3 percent and 38.1 percent for a violent crime rearrest and 52.6 percent and 77.7 percent for any arrest. [6]
  • The researchers found a sexual recidivism rate of 5.3 percent for the entire sample of sex offenders based on an arrest during the threeyear follow. [6]
  • The violent and overall arrest recidivism rates for the entire sample of sex offenders were much higher; 17.1 percent of sex offenders were rearrested for a violent crime and 43 percent were rearrested for a crime of any kind during the follow. [6]
  • Of the 9,691 sex offenders released from prison in 1994, 3.5 percent were reconvicted for a sex crime and about onequarter were reconvicted for an offense of any kind during the follow. [6]
  • Nearly four out of every 10 sex offenders in the study were returned to prison within three years of their release due to the commission of a new crime or a technical violation of their release conditions. [6]
  • Arrestees categorized as sex offenders had oneyear, threeyear and five year rearrest rates for a new sexual offense of 2.2 percent, 4.8 percent and 6.5 percent, respectively. [6]
  • The threeyear sexual recidivism rate of 4.8 percent for these sex offender arrestees was similar to the three year rate that Langan, Schmitt and Durose reported for sex offenders released from prison in 1994. [6]
  • Sex offenders in the Sample and Bray study had oneyear, threeyear and five year rearrest rates for any new offense of 21.3 percent, 37.4 percent and 45.1 percent, respectively. [6]
  • The five year sexual recidivism estimate for all sex offenders in the analysis was 14 percent. [6]
  • The 10and 15 year sexual recidivism rate estimates for all sex offenders were 20 percent and 24 percent, respectively. [6]
  • Using the same data set, Hanson, Morton and Harris reported that the 20 year sexual recidivism rate for the sample was 27 percent. [6]
  • While 14 percent of the offenders in the analysis were sexual recidivists after five years of followup, only 7 percent of the offenders who were offensefree at that time sexually recidivated during the next five follow. [6]
  • For offenders who were offensefree after 15 years, the observed sexual recidivism rate was only 4 percent over an additional five years of follow. [6]
  • The average sexual recidivism rate based on an average follow up period of 46 months was 12.3 percent for treated sex offenders and 16.8 percent for untreated sex offenders. [6]
  • The average overall recidivism rate was 27.9 percent for treated sex offenders and 39.2 percent for untreated sex offenders. [6]
  • The researchers found an average sexual recidivism rate of 11.1 percent for treated sex offenders and 17.5 percent for untreated sex offenders based on an average follow up period of slightly more than five years. [6]
  • The researchers found that treated offenders had a mean sexual recidivism rate of 10.1 percent, and that without treatment the recidivism rate would have been 13.7 percent. [6]
  • Treated offenders in the analysis had a general recidivism rate of 32.6 percent on average compared to an expected general recidivism rate of 41.2 percent without treatment. [6]
  • Based on a fiveyear follow up period, 5.8 percent of the offenders in the group that received polygraph testing and 6.7 percent of the offenders in the group that did not receive polygraph testing were charged with a new sex offense. [6]
  • The general recidivism rates for the polygraph and nonpolygraph groups were more than five times higher than each group’s sexual recidivism rate. [6]
  • Treated sex offenders had a violent crime recidivism rate of 42.9 percent and an overall recidivism rate of 56.6 percent. [6]
  • Untreated sex offenders in the study had a violent crime recidivism rate of 44.5 percent and an overall recidivism rate of 60.4 percent. [6]
  • Based on a mean postrelease follow up period of 11.7 years, the researchers reported sexual recidivism rates of 10.7 percent for treated sex offenders and 20.2 for untreated sex offenders. [6]
  • Violent crime recidivism rates for the treated and untreated groups were 26.5 percent and 44.2 percent, respectively. [6]
  • Based on an eightyear followup period, the researchers reported sexual recidivism rates of 13 percent and 9.7 percent for the preand post. [6]
  • General recidivism rates of 51.4 percent for the preSORN releasees and 48 percent for the post SORN releasees were also reported. [6]
  • The researchers reported that both treated and untreated offenders in the study had recidivism rates of 5 percent based on reconviction for a new sexual offense over an average 6.5 year follow. [6]
  • By comparison, the general recidivism rates reported for treated and untreated sex offenders in the study were 25 percent and 51.7 percent, respectively. [6]
  • For the treated sex offenders, the researchers found sexual reconviction rates of 11.1 percent after three years of followup, 16.9 percent after five years of followup and 21.8 percent after 10 years of follow. [6]
  • Sexual reconviction rates for the untreated sex offenders were 17.7 percent after three years, 24.5 percent after five years and 32.3 percent after 10 years of follow. [6]
  • Durose and colleagues reported that inmates who had been incarcerated specifically for rape or sexual assault had an overall recidivism rate based on a new arrest of 21.9 percent one year after release. [6]
  • By comparison, the overall recidivism rate for these sex offenders was 50.9 percent three years after release and 60.1 percent five years after release. [6]
  • In the study conducted by Harris and Hanson , sexual recidivism rates increased from 14 percent after five years of followup to 24 percent after 15 years of follow. [6]
  • In the study conducted by Olver, Wong and Nicholaichuk , sexual recidivism rates for treated offenders increased from 11.1 percent after three years of followup to 21.8 percent after 10 years of follow. [6]
  • In a somewhat older study, Hanson, Scott and Steffy found that firsttime recidivism for a sexual/violent crime occurred between 10 and 31 years into follow up for 10 percent of a sample of 191 child molesters released from a Canadian prison16. [6]
  • The researchers found an average sexual recidivism rate of 13.4 percent based on an average follow up period of four to five years, and an average overall recidivism rate of 36.3 percent. [6]
  • The average sexual recidivism rate found was 13.7 percent and the average overall recidivism rate was 36.9 percent, based on an average follow up period of five to six years. [6]
  • Based on an average follow up period of 5 years, the researchers found an average sexual recidivism rate for female sex offenders of 1 percent. [6]
  • The observed violent recidivism rate was 6.3 percent and the overall recidivism rate was 20.2 percent. [6]
  • They found sexual recidivism rates of 0.8 percent, 1.3 percent and 1.8 percent, based on follow up periods of one, three and five years, respectively. [6]
  • The fiveyear rearrest rate found for a violent felony offense was 5.2 percent and the five year rearrest rate found for any offense was 26.6 percent. [6]
  • The researchers found an average sexual recidivism rate of about 3 percent for female sex offenders based on an average follow up period of 6.5 years. [6]
  • Estimates suggest that 32–64 percent of rapists have molested children and that many child molesters have assaulted adults ; Wilcox and colleagues, 2005). [6]
  • Sexual recidivism rates for rapists, based on new charges or convictions, were 14 percent at five years, 21 percent at 10 years and 24 percent at 15 years.27. [6]
  • The researchers found that 5 percent of the 3,115 rapists released from state prison in 1994 were arrested for a new sex offense during the threeyear follow. [6]
  • Of these 3,115 rapists, 78 were charged specifically with another rape. [6]
  • The violent crime and overall recidivism rates found for rapists were 18.7 percent and 46 percent, respectively. [6]
  • Like sex offenders overall, rapists had a lower overall recidivism rate than non sex offenders in the study , but a higher sexual recidivism rate. [6]
  • The researchers found sexual recidivism rates of 9 percent after one year of followup, 19 percent after five years of followup and 31 percent after 15 years of follow. [6]
  • Based on the 25year follow up period, the researchers found a sexual recidivism rate of 39 percent. [6]
  • The overall recidivism rate for any charge by the end of the 25year follow up period was 74 percent. [6]
  • Doren further suggested that “rapist sexual recidivism should be considered to have a conservative approximation of its true base rate at about 39 percent.”. [6]
  • Similar to the pattern for rapists in the study, child molesters with more than one prior arrest had an overall recidivism rate nearly double that of child molesters with only one prior arrest. [6]
  • During the threeyear postrelease followup period, 3.3 percent of the child molesters, 2.2 percent of all sex offenders and less than onehalf of 1 percent of the non sex offenders were arrested for child molestation. [6]
  • Released child molesters with more than one prior arrest for child molesting were three times more likely to be rearrested for child molesting than released child molesters with no more than one prior arrest. [6]
  • 10and 15 year sexual recidivism rates based on new charges or convictions of 13 percent, 18 percent and 23 percent, respectively. [6]
  • The researchers found that nine of the 23 treated exhibitionists and 12 of the 21. [6]
  • Based on a follow up period of almost four years, the researchers found that four of the 17 exhibitionists recidivated. [6]
  • The researchers reported a 32percent recidivism rate based on a conviction for a contact sexual offense during the followup period, and a 75 percent recidivism rate based on a conviction for any type of crime other than exposing. [6]
  • Based on an average follow up period of 6.8 years, the researchers found a sexual recidivism rate of 11.7 percent , a violent crime recidivism rate of 16.8 percent and an overall recidivism rate of 32.7 percent. [6]
  • The total number of juvenile complaints in North Carolina decreased by 19 percent between 2010 and 2020. [7]
  • Of the 1.5 million people in state and federal prisons in 2016, 8.5 percent, or 128,063, were incarcerated in private prisons. [8]
  • Over a similar timeframe, the proportion of people detained in private immigration facilities increased by 442 percent. [8]
  • Of the total U.S. prison population, one in 12 people was incarcerated in private prisons in 2016; an increase of 47 percent since 2000. [8]
  • 26,249 people were also confined in privately run immigration detention facilities in fiscal year 2017; a 442 percent increase since 2002. [8]
  • Federal prisons incarcerated the largest number of people in private prisons, 34,159, marking a 120 percent increase since 2000. [8]
  • Between 2000 and 2016, the number of people incarcerated in private prison facilities increased 47 percent while the overall prison population increased 9 percent. [8]
  • Arizona had the largest increase, holding 479 percent more people in private prisons in 2016 than in 2000, followed by Indiana , Ohio , Florida , Georgia , and Tennessee. [8]
  • New Mexico had the highest proportion of its population held privately in both 2000 and 2016, with respective rates of 40 and 43 percent, followed closely by Montana with a rate of 39 percent in 2016. [8]
  • Four additional states incarcerated 20% or more of their prison population privately Oklahoma , Tennessee , Hawaii , and Arizona. [8]
  • JurisdictionNumber of people, 2016Number of people, 2000Percent private, 2016Percent change, 2000. [8]
  • The number of federal prisoners held in private prisons rose 120 percent from 15,524 in 2000 to 34,159 in 2016, while the number of state prisoners incarcerated privately grew by 31 percent over the same time period, from 71,845 to 94,164. [8]
  • Among those confined under private contracts in the federal system, about 37% are in halfway houses or are on home confinement. [8]
  • According to ICE reports, arrests and detentions of immigrants have increased more than 40 percent since mid. [8]
  • Labor costs normally account for 60 to 70 percent of annual operating budgets. [8]
  • In 2016, following the Department of Justice’s announcement that it would phase out private prisons, stock prices dropped 50 percent. [8]
  • In 2010, the population in private prisons began to stabilize and even declined 2.5% between 2015 and 2016. [8]
  • In addition to adult prisons, 95% of Florida’s juvenile facilities are privately owned. [8]
  • The state incarcerated 43% of its prison population in for profit prisons as of 2016. [8]
  • From 2000 to 2016 New Mexico witnessed steady growth in its for profit prisons, increasing the population by 41%. [8]
  • Admissions to Texas prisons increased by 113 percent from 1980 to 1986, and outpaced system capacity increases by 52 percent. [8]

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Reference


  1. americanjail – https://www.americanjail.org/jail-statistics.
  2. ojp – https://nij.ojp.gov/topics/articles/data-informed-jail.
  3. nicic – https://nicic.gov/projects/statistics.
  4. www – https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2019/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2019-and-annual-2019.
  5. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/correctional-officers.htm.
  6. ice – https://www.ice.gov/detain/detention-management.
  7. ojp – https://smart.ojp.gov/somapi/chapter-5-adult-sex-offender-recidivism.
  8. ncdps – https://www.ncdps.gov/about-dps/department-public-safety-statistics.
  9. sentencingproject – https://www.sentencingproject.org/publications/capitalizing-on-mass-incarceration-u-s-growth-in-private-prisons/.

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