Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
Last updated: 
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Are you looking to add Restaurant Delivery/Takeout to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Restaurant Delivery/Takeout statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Restaurant Delivery/Takeout stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Restaurant Delivery/Takeout statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Restaurant Delivery/Takeout have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Restaurant Delivery/Takeout? We will answer all your Restaurant Delivery/Takeout related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 339 Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Statistics on this page 🙂

Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Market Statistics

  • GrubHub accounts for 53% of the online ordering market in NYC. [0]
  • Postmates is more prevalent on the West Coast, which is clearly illustrated by the mere 1% of market share it represents in the major East Coast market of Philadelphia. [0]
  • DoorDash pulled ahead of the competition in 2020 and currently has 57 percent of market share in the US, the second largest market for food delivery. [1]
  • By the end of 2020, DoorDash controlled 45% of the food delivery market, with UberEats at 22%, Grubhub at 18%, and Postmates at 8%. [2]
  • In 2015, DoorDash’s share of the US food delivery market was just 5%. [2]
  • In 2020 the companysnaggeda 45% market share and nearly $3 billion in revenue. [2]
  • 13% of the entire US restaurant market was taken up by online food delivery during COVID. [3]
  • By 2025, online food delivery is expected to grow to a 21% share of the total restaurant market. [3]
  • In the United States, the market has more than doubled during the COVID 19 pandemic, following healthy historical growth of 8 percent. [4]
  • As of May 2021, DoorDash prevailed in San Jose , Houston , Philadelphia , and San Antonio. [4]
  • Combined, Uber Eats and Postmates led the market in Los Angeles and New York City as of May 2021. [4]
  • The robot food delivery market is predicted to grow to $34 million in 2024 85% of last mile delivery will be completed by autonomous vehicles by 2025. [5]

Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software Statistics

  • After POS technology and payment processing, the most popular back office technologies were accounting software (52%, up from 31% in 2018) and payroll software (50%, up from 28% in 2018). [6]
  • According to Software Advice, the search for food delivery software has increased 179% on their website between the months of February and March 2020. [7]

Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Latest Statistics

  • 60% of U.S. consumersorder delivery or takeout once a week. [8]
  • 31% say they use these third party delivery servicesat least twice a week. [8]
  • 34% of consumers spendat least $50per order when ordering food online. [8]
  • 20% of consumers saythey spend more on offpremise orderscompared to a regular dine. [8]
  • 300% fasterthan dine in traffic since 2014. [8]
  • 70% of consumers say they’drather order directly from a restaurant, preferring that their money goes straight to the restaurant and not a third party. [8]
  • 57% of millennials say that they have restaurant food delivered so they canwatch movies and TV shows at home. [8]
  • 59% of restaurant orders from millennials aretakeout or delivery. [8]
  • 33% of consumers say they would be willing topay a higher feefor faster delivery service. [8]
  • 87% of Americans who use third party food delivery services agree that itmakes their lives easier. [8]
  • 45% of consumers say thatoffering mobile ordering or loyalty programswould encourage them to use online ordering services more often. [8]
  • 63% of consumers agree thatit is more convenient to get deliverythan dining out with a family. [8]
  • Americans who have not used a thirdparty restaurant delivery service say fast delivery (31%), restaurant selection (28%), low order minimums (27%). [8]
  • (26%)would motivate them to try it. [8]
  • 60% of restaurant operators say thatoffering delivery has generated incremental sales. [8]
  • Pizza chains reportedan 18% increasein customer spend from online/mobile orders vs. phone orders. [8]
  • Working with a third party delivery service has been found toraise restaurant sales volume by 10 to 20%. [8]
  • Delivery sales could rise an annual average ofmore than 20%to $365 billion worldwide by 2030, from $35 billion. [8]
  • 43% of restaurant professionals said they believe third party apps—many of which withhold data—interfere with the direct relationship between a restaurant/bar/pub and its customers. [8]
  • Customers who place an online order with a restaurantwill visit that restaurant 67% more frequentlythan those who don’t. [8]
  • It’s estimated thatmobile orders will make up close to 11% of all QSR salesby 2020. [8]
  • Visits to U.S. restaurants where guestspaid by mobile app increased by 50%from 2017. [8]
  • Own your online ordering system43% of restaurant professionalssaid. [8]
  • From February to April there was a169% increase in the number of restaurants actively using Online Orderingwith Upserve as restaurants quickly innovated and pivoted to takeout and delivery, paired with an840% increase in weekly sales via online ordering. [8]
  • In large suburbs, online ordering grew 3,868% between February and April. [8]
  • The top three items that have spiked in sales in 2020 compared to 2019 are sandwiches and wraps (+21%), burgers (+10%), and pizza (+9%). [8]
  • With 70% of consumers interested in ordering directly from a restaurant, Kenn is keeping delivery commissions in his pocket through an integrated solution. [8]
  • Introducing online ordering has increased sales by 10%. [8]
  • Kenji’s saves 35% per order by using an owned online ordering solution. [8]
  • 60% of American consumers order takeout or delivery at least once a week. [0]
  • 31% of American consumers use third party food delivery services at least twice a week. [0]
  • Online ordering is growing 300% faster than in. [0]
  • 70% of consumers would prefer to order directly from a restaurant rather than use a third. [0]
  • 59% of millennial restaurant orders are for takeout or delivery. [0]
  • Consumers who order pizza online spend 18% more than orders placed over the phone on average. [0]
  • 33% of consumers say they would pay a higher fee for faster delivery. [0]
  • 45% of consumers say that mobile ordering or loyalty programs would encourage them to use online ordering services more. [0]
  • 41% of consumers say, if offered, they would purchase a makeat home meal kit from their favorite restaurant. [0]
  • 60% of restaurant operators say that offering delivery has generated incremental sales. [0]
  • Working with a thirdparty delivery service raises restaurant sales volume by 10. [0]
  • 43% of restaurant professionals believe third party apps interfere with a direct relationship with their customers. [0]
  • Customers who place an online order with a restaurant will visit that restaurant 67% more frequently than those who don’t. [0]
  • That represents a 17% yearover year increase from 2019. [0]
  • That is, in fact, the case as this number represents a 20% increase year over year. [0]
  • Food delivery and online ordering are expected to show an annual growth rate of 5.1% from now until 2024, which would make it a $32 billion industry by 2024. [0]
  • In comparison, GrubHub accounts for just 7% of sales in Miami. [0]
  • DoorDash accounts for an astounding 65% of all food delivery sales in San Francisco. [0]
  • Surprisingly another giant based in the Bay Uber Eats accounts for only 14% of food delivery sales. [0]
  • Uber Eats rules in South Beach, where it accounts for 62% of online ordering sales. [0]
  • Postmates represents just 31% of food delivery sales in the city. [0]
  • Just 11% of owners feel delivery impacts dine in business negatively while only 7% say it impacts takeout sales negatively. [0]
  • Working with a third party delivery service raises restaurant sales volume by 10 to 20%. [0]
  • ( 85% of people want restaurants to use tamper evident labels to reduce instances of drivers taking food from their orders. [9]
  • ( 63% of people are more likely to tip digitally through a delivery app, rather than in. [9]
  • ( 60% of deliverers say a low or no tip as their biggest gripe about the job. [9]
  • ( 53% of people tip more in inclement weather. [9]
  • ( 17% of people have had delivery drivers place their food outside of their doors and leave. [9]
  • ( Consumers think that delivery drivers (54%) are more deserving of tips than servers (47%). [9]
  • A whopping 45% of diners go out to eat multiple times a week, with another 20% going out to eat once a week. [6]
  • ( Projected annual sales in the restaurant industry are $863 billion – that’s 4% of the country’s gross domestic product. [6]
  • Projected annual sales in the restaurant industry are $863 billion – that’s 4% of the country’s gross domestic product. [6]
  • ( In 1955, the restaurant industry comprised 25% of the family food dollar. [6]
  • In 2019, that number rose to 51%. [6]
  • In 1955, the restaurant industry comprised 25% of the family food dollar. [6]
  • ( American consumers spend 33% of their income on housing, 15.8% on transportation, and 12.6% on food. [6]
  • American consumers spend 33% of their income on housing, 15.8% on transportation, and 12.6% on food. [6]
  • ( 52% of restaurant professionals named high operating and food costs as a top challenge. [6]
  • 52% of restaurant professionals named high operating and food costs as a top challenge. [6]
  • ( 51% of restaurant operators name staffing as a top challenge to success, and 35% say training staff is a top challenge. [6]
  • 51% of restaurant operators name staffing as a top challenge to success, and 35% say training staff is a top challenge. [6]
  • ( Turnover in the restaurant industry is at an all time high, at 75%. [6]
  • Turnover in the restaurant industry is at an all time high, at 75%. [6]
  • ( The United States unemployment rate, as of June 2019, is extremely low, at 3.7%. [6]
  • The United States unemployment rate, as of June 2019, is extremely low, at 3.7%. [6]
  • ( As a result of minimum wage increases, 47% of restaurant operators admitted they have scheduled employees for fewer hours each week in the past twelve months. [6]
  • As a result of minimum wage increases, 47% of restaurant operators admitted they have scheduled employees for fewer hours each week in the past twelve months. [6]
  • ( For the same reason, 16% of restaurant operators have had to halt hiring efforts to lower labor costs. [6]
  • For the same reason, 16% of restaurant operators have had to halt hiring efforts to lower labor costs. [6]
  • ( 68% of restaurants offer anemployee handbookto new hires. [6]
  • 68% of restaurants offer an 32% of restaurants provide sexual harassment training to their staff. [6]
  • 46% of restaurants offer a mentor program. [6]
  • 53% of restaurants offer food safety and alcohol certification training. [6]
  • 67% of restaurants plan to pay for social media ads in 2019. [6]
  • ( 53% plan to invest in being a community event or charity sponsor. [6]
  • 53% plan to invest in being a community event or charity sponsor. [6]
  • ( When it comes to social media, restaurants are most likely to use Facebook (91% of restaurants) and Instagram (78%). [6]
  • Instagram has skyrocketed in popularity for restaurant promotion since last year, when only 24% reported using it. [6]
  • When it comes to social media, restaurants are most likely to use Facebook (91% of restaurants) and Instagram (78%). [6]
  • ( Restaurants are least likely to use YouTube for promotions (only 14% of restaurants report using it). [6]
  • Restaurants are least likely to use YouTube for promotions (only 14% of restaurants report using it). [6]
  • ( When dealing with negative online reviews or in person feedback, 23% of restaurateurs reach out directly to the person who gave the feedback. [6]
  • 15% put the feedback to use when giving performance reviews to frontofhouse or backof. [6]
  • Some restaurant professionals — 2% — admitted to never taking action when receiving negative guest feedback. [6]
  • When dealing with negative online reviews or in person feedback, 23% of restaurateurs reach out directly to the person who gave the feedback. [6]
  • As a result of minimum wage increases, 65% of restaurants have increased menu prices. [6]
  • ( 68% of restaurant professionals review sales reports on a regular basis, 45% regularly review labor reports, and 32% regularly review menu reports – and 17% admitted that they don’t check any of these regularly. [6]
  • 68% of restaurant professionals review sales reports on a regular basis, 45% regularly review labor reports, and 32% regularly review menu reports – and 17% admitted that they don’t check any of these regularly. [6]
  • ( 91% of restaurateurs expect profits to increase in 2019. [6]
  • 91% of restaurateurs expect profits to increase in 2019. [6]
  • ( If they had extra money on hand, 47% of restaurateurs would repair or update their equipment. [6]
  • If they had extra money on hand, 47% of restaurateurs would repair or update their equipment. [6]
  • Pent up demand for restaurants remains high, with 39% of adults not eating on premises at restaurants as often as they would like. [6]
  • ( 78% of millennials say they would rather spend money on an experience, such as a restaurant or other activity, compared to purchasing an item from a store. [6]
  • 78% of millennials say they would rather spend money on an experience, such as a restaurant or other activity, compared to purchasing an item from a store. [6]
  • ( If offered, 41% of consumers would buy a makeat home meal kit from their favorite restaurant. [6]
  • If offered, 41% of consumers would buy a makeat home meal kit from their favorite restaurant. [6]
  • ( 72% of diners ranked high quality food as the top factor that goes into choosing a restaurant to visit. [6]
  • Surprisingly, only 48% said value was their number. [6]
  • 72% of diners ranked high quality food as the top factor that goes into choosing a restaurant to visit. [6]
  • ( 35% of diners said they are influenced by online reviews when choosing a restaurant. [6]
  • 35% of diners said they are influenced by online reviews when choosing a restaurant. [6]
  • 54% of millennials say aself ordering kioskimproves the guest experience. [6]
  • a When paying for a low ticket item , 62% of guests opt to use their credit or debit card. [6]
  • When paying for a low ticket item , 62% of guests opt to use their credit or debit card. [6]
  • , 88% of guests pay with their card. [6]
  • When paying for a high ticket item , 88% of guests pay with their card. [6]
  • ( 4% of restaurants offer payment through Venmo. [6]
  • 4% of restaurants offer payment through Venmo. [6]
  • ( Only 31% of restaurants offer mobile pay. [6]
  • Only 31% of restaurants offer mobile pay. [6]
  • ( 50% of people still want printed receipts, but 36% are happy with digital receipts – and 14% don’t want a receipt at all. [6]
  • 50% of people still want printed receipts, but 36% are happy with digital receipts – and 14% don’t want a receipt at all. [6]
  • 31% of restaurateurs update their menu on a monthly basis. [6]
  • ( 61% of diners say they are more likely to eat healthy at a restaurant than they were two years ago. [6]
  • 61% of diners say they are more likely to eat healthy at a restaurant than they were two years ago. [6]
  • ( To reduce food waste, 28% of restaurants repurpose food trimmings, 26% offer varied portion sizes, and 25% compost. [6]
  • To reduce food waste, 28% of restaurants repurpose food trimmings, 26% offer varied portion sizes, and 25% compost. [6]
  • ( 51% of consumers say they are more likely to visit a restaurant that offers environmentally. [6]
  • 51% of consumers say they are more likely to visit a restaurant that offers environmentally. [6]
  • ( Diners love breakfast all day 55% say they. [6]
  • Diners love breakfast all day 55% say they’d order breakfast items at any time if they were offered. [6]
  • ( To seek out guest feedback, 29% of restaurateurs use manual comment cards, another 31% ask for feedback on their printed receipts, and 25% use a rating scale in digital receipts. [6]
  • To seek out guest feedback, 29% of restaurateurs use manual comment cards, another 31% ask for feedback on their printed receipts, and 25% use a rating scale in digital receipts. [6]
  • ( 73% of diners agree that restaurant technology improves their guest experience. [6]
  • 73% of diners agree that restaurant technology improves their guest experience. [6]
  • ( 95% of restaurateurs agree that restaurant technology improves their business efficiency. [6]
  • 95% of restaurateurs agree that restaurant technology improves their business efficiency. [6]
  • Restaurateurs say credit card processing, accounting, and inventory are the most important integrations to their 61% of diners agree that server handheld tablets improve their guest experience. [6]
  • 61% of diners agree that server handheld tablets improve their guest experience. [6]
  • It’spredictedto further grow to $43 billion by 2025. [2]
  • As of March 2020, 38% of American consumers hadorderedfood via a food delivery app. [2]
  • By March 2021, 47% of Americans had used a food delivery app, illustrating just how significantly the pandemic affected the food delivery industry. [2]
  • As of March 2020, 38% of American consumers had Food delivery is here to stay; in 2021, 53% of surveyrespondentsand 64% of millennial respondents say that food delivery and takeout are “essential to the way they live.”. [2]
  • Food delivery is here to stay; in 2021, 53% of survey. [2]
  • Nearly everyone orders food delivery in the US; Gloria Food’sstudyfound that 86% of Americans had ordered food delivery at least once a month. [2]
  • they’re more likely to order takeout in 2021 than they were pre. [2]
  • 81% of fine dining restaurants, 78% of family dining establishments, and 77% of fast casual restaurantsaddedcurbside takeout to their operations after March 2020. [2]
  • 81% of fine dining restaurants, 78% of family dining establishments, and 77% of fast casual restaurants Food delivery and online ordering apps were some of themost popular app downloadsin 2020. [2]
  • Although UberEats takes a 20 to 30 percent cut of each order, the company is still not profitable. [2]
  • In March 2021, in San Francisco, DoorDash had 71% of the city’s food delivery sales. [2]
  • In Miami, however, UberEats was the biggest player, with a 55% share. [2]
  • And in Los Angeles, Postmates made up 32% of sales, while in most other cities it barely reached 5%. [2]
  • Over 40% of UberEats, Grubhub, and Postmates usersalso usedDoorDash. [2]
  • Over 40% of UberEats, Grubhub, and Postmates users. [2]
  • Orders placed via their mobile app make up nearly aquarterof all sales at Starbucks locations in the US, according to the coffee company’s Q3 2020 report. [2]
  • as of late 2020, mobile orders comprisearound 75%of Domino’s sales. [2]
  • Domino’s is another chain experiencing massive success from its mobile app; as of late 2020, mobile orders comprise Most online orders, about 60%, are made onsmartphones. [2]
  • Most online orders, about 60%, are made on. [2]
  • Pizza Hut first 23% of restaurants say their customers are more engaged with their onlineofferingsnow compared to pre pandemic times, showing a shift toward digital ordering channels. [2]
  • 23% of restaurants say their customers are more engaged with their online. [2]
  • Out of that group, 61% said their preference for direct ordering was because they wanted to support the restaurant. [2]
  • A study of over 100,000 food delivery appreviewsmentioned phrases like “first time” 36% more frequently in 2020 than in 2019. [2]
  • According to a 2020 National Restaurant Association study, millennials are the food delivery generation. [2]
  • The National Restaurant Association found that while just 41% of baby boomers had ordered delivery last week during their March 2020 survey, that number grew to 60% when the same group was surveyed in November 2020. [2]
  • The averagepizza orderplaced online is 18% larger than pizza lovers who ordered over the phone. [2]
  • But it’s not just pizza; revenue fromonline ordersin general is around 23% higher than an in. [2]
  • The most popular 35% of delivery and takeout customers and 53% of millennial customers said they would bemore likelyto order from a restaurant that offered to. [2]
  • 35% of delivery and takeout customers and 53% of millennial customers said they would be. [2]
  • In a 2019 study oftop complaintsrelated to food delivery, 17% of consumers said their food arrived not warm or not fresh, and 16% said their food arrived late. [2]
  • About 14% of people have usedvoice assistants, like Siri and Alexa, to order food delivery while they’re driving. [2]
  • About 14% of people have used Google hasintegratedfood delivery options into Google Maps and Google Search listings for restaurants, making it even easier for consumers to find restaurants that offer mobile ordering and delivery. [2]
  • Day, New Year’s Eve, and Halloween are the most popular holidays for food delivery, according to a 2020 DoorDashreport. [2]
  • Day, New Year’s Eve, and Halloween are the most popular holidays for food delivery, according to a 2020 DoorDash Speed is the name of the game. [2]
  • The average delivery window for food is around 35 minutes, but 27% of people say they would bewillingto pay extra for their food to arrive faster. [2]
  • The average delivery window for food is around 35 minutes, but 27% of people say they would be The volume of off premises food orders placed onlinesurpassedthe volume of phone orders back in 2017. [2]
  • A May 2020 Wall Street Journal study found that out of all offpremise restaurantsales, 53% were carryout orders, 38% were drive thru orders, and only 9% were delivery orders. [2]
  • 39% of consumers said they would spend more at restaurants that offered some sort of loyalty perks, but only 62% of restaurants studied had loyalty programs. [2]
  • A 2019surveyfound that 21% of food delivery customers suspected a driver of taking some of their food order, and. [2]
  • 85% of consumers wished that restaurants would use tamper. [2]
  • A 2019 More consumers want contactless solutions, as demonstrated in a late 2020 survey that showed consumers’ toppayment optionswere contactless credit cards (43%) and contactless debit cards (39%). [2]
  • More consumers want contactless solutions, as demonstrated in a late 2020 survey that showed consumers’ top Technology doesn’t only offer extra convenience for consumers; 95% of restaurateurs say technology helps them run their businesses moreefficiently. [2]
  • Technology doesn’t only offer extra convenience for consumers; 95% of restaurateurs say technology helps them run their businesses more. [2]
  • 80% of Americans have ordered food for home delivery at some stage 34% of food delivery customers used Uber Eats between February and April 2020. [3]
  • 63% of people between the ages of 18 and 29 are more likely to use food delivery apps. [3]
  • 8% of Americans have at least one subscription to a meal kit delivery service. [3]
  • retail deliver orders have risen by 26%. [3]
  • Planning capacity for online deliveries for many businesses has increased by 200% Source. [3]
  • To prove this, we need look no further than the following customer related food delivery service statistics which have been compiled by Tacit around 60% of US customers order from a restaurant every single week. [3]
  • last year, restaurants that didn’t offer online food delivery were expected to lose over 70% of their customers one third of online orderers will pay more than $50 for their meal. [3]
  • around 63% of customers prefer the convenience of delivery over dining out with their family since 2014, digital orders for food have been growing at three times the rate of onsite ordering. [3]
  • 64.3% of Grubhub’s users are female. [3]
  • Please email us at Before the pandemic put thousands of establishments out of business, the US restaurant industry was growing 3 to 4 percent per year. [4]
  • Delivery sales were increasing at roughly twice that pace. [4]
  • Historically, restaurants have measured their profits against three basic costs food , labor , and occupancyor realestate. [4]
  • Looking at a unit economics view of a restaurant, the business should run between 78 to 93 percent allowing for a profit margin of between 7 to 22 percent. [4]
  • Realistically, restaurants’ traditional profit margins of 7 to 22 percent make covering the platforms’ delivery commissions, roughly 15 to 30 percent, unsustainable as delivery orders become a larger part of a restaurant’s business. [4]
  • As Chipotle Mexican Grill’s chief financial officer, Jack Hartung, told Yahoo Finance Live in early February, after a 13 percent rise in delivery app prices was announced “It’s no surprise that delivery comes with an added cost. [4]
  • Our analysis shows an average contribution margin of around 3 percent, or roughly $1.20 on the average order. [4]
  • Please email us at The cost of delivery is unlikely to decline substantially, as the economics of last mile delivery remain challenging across sectors, particularly with increasing expectations for speed. [4]
  • Customers’ total costs include delivery fees , driver tips , and platform service fees. [4]
  • Please email us at Even as customers are paying a 40 percent premium on the cost of their actual meal, it is worth noting that restaurants themselves receive around only 55 percent of the total customer spend. [4]
  • 100 percent order accuracy and completeness, for regular items as well as special requests variety in cuisines and meal occasions. [4]
  • Burger King, for example, recently unveiled plans for a restaurant that is 60 percent smaller than its traditional outposts, accommodating the influx of togo orders with features such as “pickup lockers” and dedicated curbside. [4]
  • 42% of food purchases are done online. [5]
  • 43% of people say they order online because don’t feel like cooking. [5]
  • 70% of consumer prefer ordering online for delivery 56% of traffic to U.S. food brand websites is generated by search engines. [5]
  • 53% of consumer bought groceries online during the pandemic. [5]
  • 93 percent of consumers say they plan to continue shopping for groceries online after the pandemic. [5]
  • 73% of online grocery orders were delivered 41% of consumers use technology to make shopping easier. [5]
  • 68% of shoppers use a mobile app while shopping. [5]
  • 63% of people have dined in at a restaurant during COVID 58% of people feel uncomfortable eating at a restaurant during the pandemic. [5]
  • 60% of diners are interested in ordering a take home DIY meal kit from restaurants. [5]
  • 34% of consumers order up to $50 when buying food online 87% of people who use third. [5]
  • 60% of millenials says they have restaurant food delivered to watch a movie or TV show. [5]
  • 51% of people order delivery from a casual food restaurant. [5]
  • 81% of customers believe delivered meal kits are more healthy than takeout food. [5]
  • 37% say meal boxes save time on groceries 92% were satisfied with the quality of the food in their meal kit. [5]
  • People under age 35 are more than twice as likely to have used a meal kit service. [5]
  • 27% of meal kit users say they have switched companies since they first started using meal kits. [5]
  • 45% of restaurants deliveries are made with Doordash. [5]
  • 15% of customers complained the food was not hot enough. [5]
  • 28% of delivery drivers admitted sampling food. [5]
  • 33% of consumers say would pay more for faster delivery service. [5]
  • 87% of people say third party delivery apps make their life easier. [5]
  • 85% of consumers would like restaurants to use tamper evident labels to address the concern of delivery drivers eating from takeout orders. [5]
  • 58% of foodborne illnesses are attributed to norovirus. [5]
  • Fish has the largest number of cases associated with food related sickness at 17%. [5]
  • Now, 53 percent of adults say purchasing takeout or delivery food is essential to the way they live. [10]
  • By September, average weekly sales ran $95,803 and to go mixed 21.1 percent. [10]
  • Yet the question is, will that 21 percent, even as it slides back in terms of overall sales mix, still represent a higher dollar figure than before?. [10]
  • Nobody can truly say until operators work in a 100 percent capacity environment for some time, one that also doesn’t require 6 feet of distance. [10]
  • 49 percent Casual dining 52 percent Fine dining 54 percent Quick service 35 percent Fast casual. [10]
  • 45 percent Coffee and snack 27 percent Restaurant operators reporting of their current offpremises sales compared to preCOVID 19 levels Family dining Larger proportion of sales 69 percent. [10]
  • Smaller proportion of sales 18 percent. [10]
  • Larger proportion of sales 70 percent Smaller proportion of sales 14 percent. [10]
  • About the same 16 percent Fine dining. [10]
  • Larger proportion of sales 63 percent Smaller proportion of sales 19 percent. [10]
  • Larger proportion of sales 74 percent Smaller proportion of sales 17 percent. [10]
  • Larger proportion of sales 74 percent Smaller proportion of sales 15 percent. [10]
  • About the same 11 percent Coffee and snack. [10]
  • Larger proportion of sales 56 percent Smaller proportion of sales 18 percent. [10]
  • All adults 53 percent Gen Z 54 percent Gen X 57 percent Millennials 64 percent. [10]
  • Baby Boomers 43 percent Percentage of consumers who say they’re more likely to purchase takeout food from a restaurant than they were before the outbreak. [10]
  • All adults 68 percent Gen Z 62 percent Gen Z 68 percent. [10]
  • Percentage of restaurant operators who say they added curbside takeout since the beginning of the outbreak in March Family dining 78 percent Casual dining 73 percent Fine dining 81 percent Quick service 58 percent. [10]
  • 77 percent Coffee and snack 64 percent. [10]
  • Six in 10 adults said they’re more likely to get their food delivered than they were before the outbreak. [10]
  • Nearly twothirds of current delivery customers said they prefer to order directly from the restaurant; 18 percent prefer to do so through third party; 18 percent don’t care. [10]
  • Baby Boomers said they prefer to order directly through the restaurant for delivery. [10]
  • Family dining 46 percent Casual dining 44 percent Fine dining 46 percent. [10]
  • Inhouse delivery 7 percent Fast casual Thirdparty delivery 34 percent In house delivery 16 percent Coffee and snack. [10]
  • All adults Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 64 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 18 percent. [10]
  • Male Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 64 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 23 percent. [10]
  • Female Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 64 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 14 percent. [10]
  • No preference 22 percent Gen Z. [10]
  • Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 58 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 22 percent. [10]
  • Millennials Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 57 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 27 percent. [10]
  • Gen X Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 65 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 17 percent. [10]
  • 79 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 3 percent. [10]
  • Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 71 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 20 percent. [10]
  • No preference 9 percent Midwest Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 72 percent. [10]
  • Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 15 percent. [10]
  • No preference 14 percent South Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 62 percent. [10]
  • Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 19 percent. [10]
  • Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 56 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 19 percent. [10]
  • Urban Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 57 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 28 percent. [10]
  • Suburban Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 68 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 15 percent. [10]
  • Rural Prefer to order direct through the restaurant for delivery 71 percent Prefer to order through a third party service for delivery 6 percent. [10]
  • Only between 1–3 percent of brands added drive. [10]
  • Fast casuals were the exception, at 6 percent. [10]
  • Less than 5 percent of operators said they added delivery from a virtual or ghost kitchen since COVID’s onset. [10]
  • And it’s telling that 72 percent of adults said it’s important delivery orders come from a location that they can visit in person, the Association said. [10]
  • All adults Very important or somewhat important 72 percent Not very important or not at all important. [10]
  • Male Very important or somewhat important 72 percent Not very important or not at all important. [10]
  • Female Very important or somewhat important 72 percent Not very important or not at all important 28 percent Gen Z Very important or somewhat important 77 percent Not very important or not at all important 23 percent. [10]
  • Millennials Very important or somewhat important 76 percent Not very important or not at all important 24 percent Gen X Very important or somewhat important 75 percent Not very important or not at all important 25 percent. [10]
  • South Very important or somewhat important 73 percent Not very important or not at all important 27 percent. [10]
  • Very important or somewhat important 64 percent Not very important or not at all important. [10]
  • Urban Very important or somewhat important 74 percent Not very important or not at all important 26 percent. [10]
  • Suburban Very important or somewhat important 71 percent Not very important or not at all important. [10]
  • Rural Very important or somewhat important 71 percent Not very important or not at all important. [10]
  • A solid majority of operators, including 86 percent of fine dining ones, said they upgraded their takeout and delivery packaging during COVID. [10]
  • 78 percent Casual dining 76 percent Fine dining 86 percent Quick service 63 percent Fast casual. [10]
  • 70 percent Coffee and snack 63 percent. [10]
  • More than 90% of those respondents said they plan to eat at home just as frequently, if not more frequently, moving forward. [11]
  • According to the National Restaurant Association, nearly 70% of American adults are now more likely to order takeout than they were pre. [11]
  • This isn’t limited to quick service restaurants either a whopping 80% of fine dining and casual restaurant owners enhanced their takeout options. [11]
  • While nearly onethird of Americans use third party delivery apps to order food at least twice a week, nearly 40% said they’ve never used services like Grubhub, DoorDash, and UberEats, and instead prefer to order from restaurants directly. [11]
  • While these services have been reported to increase sales by upwards of 20%, and far more when dinein business was shut down, nearly half of restaurateurs say that third party delivery apps detract from their restaurant’s relationship with its customers. [11]
  • Some restaurants reported a nearly 20% increase in average customer spend from upsell features built into the online ordering process. [11]
  • Additionally, customers who order from a restaurant online will visit that restaurant almost 70% more often than those who don’t. [11]
  • This was up from 58% during the last week of February. [12]
  • The proportion of adults using takeout or delivery for dinner trended higher after the first few weeks of the initial lockdowns, before plateauing in the mid60% range in early. [12]
  • In late February, only 37% of adults said they ordered takeout or delivery for lunch. [12]
  • However, this indicator trended higher in recent months, and reached a pandemic high of 35% last week. [12]
  • Sixty percent of baby boomers said they ordered takeout or delivery for dinner last week – up from just 41% in late. [12]
  • Sixtysix percent of Gen Xers purchased takeout or delivery for dinner last week – up 8 percentage points from the last week in February. [12]
  • Sixty percent of millennials ordered takeout or delivery for lunch last week – up from 46% during the last week of February. [12]
  • Among adults who ordered takeout or delivery for lunch or dinner last week, 32% said they expect to increase their frequency during the next three months. [12]
  • Only 22% plan to cut their off premises frequency for lunch or dinner. [12]
  • Millennials order takeout via an app or website more than any other age group, with 79% of Millennials doing so in the last year. [13]
  • Restaurants that utilizes an online ordering system are able to grow their delivery revenue 30% more than those who do not Consumers who order pizza online on average spend 18% more than orders placed over the phone. [13]
  • Restaurant orders placed on a smartphone or custom app is over 6% of the total orders for restaurants. [13]
  • 2/3rds of consumers say that they are more likely to visit a restaurant if they have previously ordered from them online. [13]
  • Online ordering is growing 300% faster than in. [13]
  • 31% of consumers say they use third party delivery apps at least twice a week. [13]
  • 70% of consumers would rather order from a custom app than a third party app so that more money goes into the pocket of the local restaurant business. [13]
  • Pizza chains have seen an 18% increase in online sales in comparison to phone sales. [13]
  • Thirdparty delivery services have raised restaurant sales volume up to 20% in extreme cases 43% of consumers say that third party apps intentionally interfere with relationships between restaurants and their customers. [13]
  • 41% of consumers said if they were offered, they would purchase a makeat home meal kit from their favorite restaurant 52% of restaurant owners said high operating and food costs as a top challenge. [13]
  • For Millenials, they dine in 42% of the time while ordering delivery or take out 40% of the time. [13]
  • 26% of consumers order delivery at least once a week. [13]
  • 57% of Millenials say that the main reason they order out is to watch TV at home. [13]
  • 12% increase in the number of orders on weekdays, 18% increase in the number of lunch orders, 3% increase in the number dinner orders. [14]
  • These new customers place 8% more orders than average, and they tend to order higher. [14]
  • Overall employment of food and beverage serving and related workers is projected to grow 17 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. [15]
  • Within the first week, around 15% of Uber drivers had completed their first food delivery. [16]
  • 49% of 2534 yearolds 40% of 3544 yearolds 33% of 4555 yearolds 26% 5564 year. [17]
  • Here’s a look at app ordering popularity 52% of customers use specific restaurant apps for ordering. [17]
  • 48% of consumers use Grubhub, but DoorDash is a dark horse. [17]
  • The statistics offer a further explanation 45% of consumers say that offering mobile ordering and loyalty programs would encourage them to order more often, which generates higher revenues. [17]
  • [ Statistia When restaurants manage their own delivery, they make more because they aren’t taking the typical 10 30% hit to margins that outsourced delivery costs. [17]
  • Delivery profits from one meal can be 30% less than dine. [17]
  • When expenses are taken out, the restaurant profits $20.75, which is about 69% of the total check. [17]
  • The same meal ordered online for delivery only nets the restaurant $9.63, or 39% of the total check. [17]

I know you want to use Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software, thus we made this list of best Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software. We also wrote about how to learn Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software and how to install Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Restaurant Delivery/Takeout Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Restaurant Delivery/Takeout statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. fundera – https://www.fundera.com/resources/food-delivery-statistics.
  2. businessofapps – https://www.businessofapps.com/data/food-delivery-app-market/.
  3. hoteltechreport – https://hoteltechreport.com/news/online-ordering-food-delivery-statistics.
  4. beambox – https://beambox.com/food-delivery-service-statistics.
  5. mckinsey – https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/technology-media-and-telecommunications/our-insights/ordering-in-the-rapid-evolution-of-food-delivery.
  6. fooddeliverynews – http://fooddeliverynews.com/online-ordering-and-food-delivery-statistics/.
  7. toasttab – https://pos.toasttab.com/blog/on-the-line/restaurant-management-statistics.
  8. gloriafood – https://www.gloriafood.com/online-food-delivery-statistics.
  9. upserve – https://upserve.com/restaurant-insider/online-ordering-statistics/.
  10. sevenrooms – https://sevenrooms.com/en/blog/41-interesting-food-delivery-statistics/.
  11. qsrmagazine – https://www.qsrmagazine.com/consumer-trends/restaurants-2021-takeout-and-delivery-now-essential-customers.
  12. yelp – https://restaurants.yelp.com/articles/dine-in-vs-takeout-trends/.
  13. restaurant – https://restaurant.org/education-and-resources/resource-library/consumers-are-expected-to-continue-using-takeout-and-delivery/.
  14. 2ndkitchen – https://2ndkitchen.com/restaurants/online-ordering-statistics/.
  15. hellonimbly – https://hellonimbly.com/delivery-takeout-stats-for-your-restaurants-next-strategies/.
  16. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/food-preparation-and-serving/food-and-beverage-serving-and-related-workers.htm.
  17. kerry – https://www.kerry.com/insights/kerrydigest/2020/food-delivery-in-demand-during-covid-19.
  18. thanx – https://www.thanx.com/15-delivery-statistics-you-need-to-know/.

How Useful is Restaurant Delivery Takeout

Restaurant Delivery Takeout: A Convenient Solution for Our Busy Lives

In today’s fast-paced world, time has become an increasingly precious commodity. Long gone are the days when people had hours to throw down pots and pans in the kitchen to prepare a home-cooked meal. Instead, the rise of restaurant delivery takeout has filled this void, serving as a savior for individuals and families craving a delicious meal without the hassle of cooking or going out to eat. While certain skeptics may argue that this practice encourages a lazy and unhealthy lifestyle, it is essential to recognize the innumerable benefits that restaurant delivery takeout brings to the table.

One of the most notable advantages of restaurant delivery takeout is the convenience it provides. With just a few taps on our smartphones or a simple phone call, we have the ability to summon a mouth-watering feast right to our doorstep. This convenience is especially valuable for people juggling multiple responsibilities such as work, studies, or families. In a world where time seems to slip through our fingers, being able to rely on restaurant delivery takeout is a welcome respite.

Furthermore, this service transcends geographical limitations, especially in areas where transportation and accessibility to eateries can be an issue. For those living in more remote locations or busy city centers where parking is scarce, restaurant delivery takeout ensures that nobody is left behind, catering to a wider audience and fulfilling their gastronomic desires with ease. This accessibility not only bridges gaps between restaurants and customers but also promotes diversity by enabling individuals to enjoy cuisine from a range of establishments that otherwise may not be within their reach.

Another significant advantage lies in the variety and quality of food choices available for delivery. Gone are the days when one could expect a limited menu with uninspiring options. Now, many restaurants and businesses devoted solely to delivery and takeout have emerged, offering diverse options to please any palate. From delicate sushi rolls to classic hearty burgers, the options are virtually endless. This abundant culinary selection encourages people to explore different cuisines and flavors they may not have otherwise considered.

In addition to the wealth of choices available, delivery services often accommodate dietary restrictions and preferences. With options tailored for vegans, vegetarians, and individuals with allergies or gluten sensitivities, it has never been easier for every consumer to find a delicious meal tailored specifically to their needs. This inclusivity reflects the ever-evolving culinary landscape, illustrating that good food can be delightfully enjoyed by everyone, regardless of dietary restrictions.

Critics may argue that restaurant delivery takeout perpetuates unhealthy eating habits, eroding the values of cooking and healthy living. While it is true that excessive reliance on restaurant delivery can contribute to a sedentary and less wholesome lifestyle, it is important to emphasize the role of balance and personal responsibility in its consumption. Restaurant delivery allows for occasional indulgence and provides valuable time savings, which can be wisely utilized for other aspects of self-care, work, or quality time with loved ones.

In conclusion, restaurant delivery takeout has indeed become a tremendously useful and convenient solution for our hectic modern lives. Its ability to save time and energy, provide a diverse range of culinary experiences, and ensure accessibility to individuals from all walks of life grants it undeniable value. Like any tool, it must be used wisely and with moderation to maintain a healthy balance. So next time you indulge in a delicious restaurant meal delivered right to your doorstep, savor the convenience it brings and appreciate the role it plays in making our lives just a tad bit easier.

In Conclusion

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