Telemedicine Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Are you looking to add Telemedicine to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Telemedicine statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Telemedicine stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Telemedicine statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Telemedicine have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Telemedicine? We will answer all your Telemedicine related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Telemedicine Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 276 Telemedicine Statistics on this page 🙂

Telemedicine Benefits Statistics

  • Employers offering telemedicine 95% of employers are confident their organizations will continue to sponsor health care benefits in the next five years, says Willis Towers Watson’s Best Practices in Health Care Employer Survey.4. [0]
  • For employers who provide telemedicine benefits, cost savings are estimated between $19 $121 per telemedicine visit. [1]

Telemedicine Usage Statistics

  • Similarly, there is a gap between consumers’ interest in telehealth and actual usage. [2]

Telemedicine Market Statistics

  • Patient adoption at the beginning of 2020 was up over the previous year, while funding has been booming and the market is expected to reach $185.6 billion by 2026 People who have been paying attention likely won’t be surprised by this takeaway. [3]
  • India predicts a 31% increase in the telemedicine market from 2020 to 2025. [4]
  • Telemedicine makes up nearly one fourth of the health IT market, which was valued at $15.6 billion in 2014 and is expected to increase to nearly $20 billion by 2019 with a compound annual growth rate of 4.8%.7. [5]

Telemedicine Adoption Statistics

  • Patient adoption at the beginning of 2020 was up over the previous year, while funding has been booming and the market is expected to reach $185.6 billion by 2026 People who have been paying attention likely won’t be surprised by this takeaway. [3]
  • Patient adoption at the beginning of 2020 was up 33%. [1]
  • 47% of patients said immediate appointment availability would grow the adoption of virtual consultations. [1]
  • ( The telehealth adoption rate for primary care visits is 28% higher in urban geographies than rural areas, and this disparity has widened since the early weeks of the pandemic, up from an 18% differential. [6]
  • The telehealth adoption rate for primary care visits is 28% higher in urban geographies than rural areas, and this disparity has widened since the early weeks of the pandemic, up from an 18% differential. [6]
  • In 2020, consumer adoption of telehealth services has jumped to 49% from 11% in 2019. [7]
  • Since the initial spike in April 2020, telehealth adoption overall has approached up to 17 percent of all outpatient/office visit claims with evaluation and management services. [2]
  • Consumer adoption has skyrocketed, from 11 percent of US consumers using telehealth in 2019 to 46 percent of consumers now using telehealth to replace cancelled healthcare visits. [2]
  • The three states with the highest telemedicine adoption rates are Alaska (75%), Arkansas (71%), and South Dakota (70%). [5]
  • The preadoption and postadoption unadjusted 90 day mortality was similar in both case hospitals (24.0% vs. 24.3%, P=0.07) and control hospitals (23.5% vs. 23.7%, P<0.01). [8]
  • In the differenceindifferences analysis, ICU telemedicine adoption was associated with a small relative reduction in 90day mortality . [8]
  • Only 16 case hospitals (12.2%). [8]

Telemedicine Latest Statistics

  • Healthcare spending continues to grow The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services forecasts national health spending will grow at an average rate of 5.5% per year through 2027.2. [0]
  • From Mercer’s study — while the vast majority of midsize to large employers offer a telemedicine benefit, about 9% of eligible employees use it. [0]
  • Demand among millennials 40% of millennials said that a telemedicine option was “extremely or very important.”. [0]
  • Just 67% of millennials have a primary care physician, compared with 85% of baby boomers.7. [0]
  • Telemedicine patient satisfaction 79% of patients said that scheduling a telemedicine followup visit was more convenient than arranging an inperson follow up, according to Massachusetts General Hospital. [0]
  • According to the The American Journal of Accountable Care, “The use of telemedicine has been shown to allow for better long term care management and patient satisfaction.”10. [0]
  • Net cost savings is estimated at $19 $121 per telemedicine visit, depending on where the employee would have otherwise sought care. [0]
  • Over the last decade, average premium contributions by employers have increased 51% from $10,008 to $15,159. [0]
  • % of this survey’s respondents stated they were fearful to visit a doctor’s office due to COVID. [0]
  • Resulting in poorer health 11% of adults in this poll say their or their family member’s condition got worse as a result of postponing or skipping medical care due to coronavirus.18. [0]
  • Driving utilization A report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a 154% increase in telehealth visits during the last week of March 2020, compared to the same dates in 2019. [0]
  • 61% said the time spent in the virtual waiting room was also shorter than an in. [0]
  • Skipped prescriptions 29% of adults also report not taking their medicines as prescribed at some point in the past year because of cost.23. [0]
  • For 13% of that group, their condition got worse as a result. [0]
  • More than half (53%). [0]
  • According to a Merritt Hawkins survey examining 15 major metropolitan areas, the average wait for a new patient to get an appointment with a family medicine doctor is 24.2 days. [0]
  • However, rural Americans live an average of 17 minutes from their nearest hospital, with 25% of that group living more than half an hour away. [0]
  • 65% of nonmetropolitan counties do not have a psychiatrist, and nearly half do not have a psychologist. [0]
  • In the early months of COVID 19’s rapid spread across the US, 71% of patients had considered telemedicine while half had already gone through with a virtual appointment. [3]
  • Telemedicine isn’t going anywhere 83% of patients expect to use telemedicine after the pandemic resolves. [3]
  • For their part, patients are keeping an open mind More than half would use telemedicine to see a new doctor while, predictably, nearly 75% would use it to see a physician with whom they have a relationship. [3]
  • That said, patients require substantial social proof before choosing a new physician Around 40% would either need to have a personal referral or read great reviews about a physician online before they would seek virtual care with someone new. [3]
  • During the first quarter of 2020, the number of telehealth visits increased by 50%. [1]
  • Most telehealth encounters were for adults aged 18–49 years (66% in 2019 and 69% in 2020). [1]
  • Female patients are more likely to make a telehealth appointment (63% in both 2019 and 2020). [1]
  • In 2020, the percentage of telehealth visits for persons aged 18–49 years increased from 68% during the first week of January 2020 to 73% during the last week of March. [1]
  • 93% of telehealth appointments before March were unrelated to COVID. [1]
  • 69% of patients using telemedicine platforms during the early pandemic period in 2020 were managed at home with no need for an in. [1]
  • Of the remainder 31% who were prescribed an in person visit, only 1.5% were advised to seek care in an emergency department, and 3% were referred to an urgent care setting. [1]
  • 41%–42% of U.S. adults reported they delayed or avoided seeking inperson care during the pandemic because of concerns about COVID. [1]
  • 12% of U.S. adults said they even avoided seeking urgent or emergency care during the pandemic as they were unaware of a telehealth option. [1]
  • 71% of patients confirmed they had considered telemedicine as an alternative to in person appointments at some point. [1]
  • 50% of patients confirmed they had used a telemedicine service. [1]
  • Which unsurprisingly sees 20% of patients saying they would switch doctors if their doctor doesn’t offer a virtual consultation option. [1]
  • 69% of patients said easyto use technology would encourage them to book a telemedicine appointment. [1]
  • 57% of patients cite communication as a blocker to booking a telemedicine appointment. [1]
  • 47% of patients said online scheduling capabilities would encourage them to book a telemedicine appointment. [1]
  • 75% of patients say they will happily use telemedicine platforms if they can see a doctor they already have a relationship with. [1]
  • Perhaps more convincing, 50% of patients say they will happily use telemedicine platforms without knowing the doctor. [1]
  • 93% of patients said they would use telemedicine to manage prescriptions. [1]
  • 91% of patients say that telemedicine would help them stick to appointments and follow wellness regimens. [1]
  • Unsurprisingly, 74% of millennials prefer telehealth visits to in. [1]
  • 40% of millennials said that a telemedicine option was “extremely or very important.”. [1]
  • 85% of patients are satisfied with telemedicine services. [1]
  • 59% of clinicians say that virtual consultations are just as effective as in. [1]
  • 93% of clinicians believe that telehealth is an “acceptable” option for medical care. [1]
  • 89% of clinicians report telemedicine as a satisfactory method of follow. [1]
  • 85% of telepsychiatry patients say they are happy to use a virtual environment. [1]
  • Using a telehealth platform, like OneConsultation, can increase patient recruitment and retention by 81.5% 35. [1]
  • Telemedicine can reduce the costs of doctor visits by 10. [1]
  • 13.3% of patients believe telemedicine is more expensive than a doctor’s office visit 37. [1]
  • In some cases, patient care costs are reduced by 50% when implementing telemedicine. [1]
  • 60% of first time telemedicine users report no technical issues when setting yp. [1]
  • 91% of virtual consultations are free of audio interruption. [1]
  • 74.3% of consumers are unaware that their health system offers telemedicine services. [1]
  • 76% of US hospitals connect with patients through video appointments. [1]
  • 84% of telehealth “visits” result in concerns being resolved. [1]
  • General healthcare spending is growing at an alarming rate of 5.5% per year. [1]
  • (This is 20% more than the average gross domestic product (GDP). [1]
  • While the vast majority of midsize to large employers offer a telemedicine benefit, less than 2% used the service by the end of 2018. [1]
  • 79% of patients say that scheduling a telemedicine followup visit was more convenient than arranging an inperson follow. [1]
  • Without the introduction of telemedicine, employers say their annual employee costs are expected to grow by 5% year on year. [1]
  • 67% of emergency room visits would be avoidable through the use of virtual consultations. [1]
  • More than half (53%). [1]
  • In April, 64 percent of U.S. broadband households reported using a telehealth service in the previous 12 months, according to a Parks Associates report. [9]
  • Of those households, 34 percent reported they had to use telehealth as the only option to see their provider. [9]
  • Nearly 82 percent of patients said their virtual visit was as good as an in person visit, 91 percent said their virtual visit made it easy to get the care they needed and 93 percent found the interface was easy to use. [9]
  • 43% of survey respondents don’t know if telehealth services were offered by their healthcare providers pre. [4]
  • Telehealth trends showed a 154% increase in telehealth visits during the last week of March 2020, compared to the same period in 2019. [4]
  • In 2019, the U.S. (50%) and Sweden (58%). [4]
  • The first quarter of 2020 in the U.S. showed a 154% increase in telehealth visits. [4]
  • In the Asia Pacific region, insurers reported a 52% increase in the use of telehealth access to primary physician/general practitioner services from 4% to 56%. [4]
  • A German study of 2,720 participants found 57.4% of doctors, 63.8% of nurses, and 70.9% of other medical professionals described the impact of telehealth during the COVID 19 crisis as either high or very high. [4]
  • As of March 2020, Indonesia saw telemedicine app users increase by 101% compared to 2019 averages. [4]
  • In a 2021 telehealth survey, SingleCare asked respondents which of the following services they would be willing to use telehealth for 69% reported common illnesses/infections 66% reported follow up visits 49% reported talk therapy. [4]
  • 44% reported management for a chronic condition 24% reported specialist visit. [4]
  • 16% were neutral 4% not satisfied 2% extremely dissatisfied. [4]
  • More than 60% of physicians reported that telehealth is easy to use within their practice across urban, suburban, and rural locations. [4]
  • More than 50% of physicians reported improved satisfaction with their work. [4]
  • 68% of physicians reported that they wanted to increase the use of telehealth in their practice. [4]
  • For telehealth, insurance data shows that 25% of telehealth malpractice claims were from misdiagnosis of cancer, 20% misdiagnosis of stroke, and 20% misdiagnosis of infection. [4]
  • 93% of patients report that they would use telemedicine to manage prescriptions. [4]
  • 91% say telemedicine would help them stick to appointments, manage prescriptions and refills, and follow regimen recommendations. [4]
  • Reported hospital mortality decreased from 13.8% before telemedicine to 11.8% after telehealth implementation. [4]
  • 62% of survey respondents paid an average of $1 to $30 outof pocket per telehealth visit. [4]
  • Insurance or Medicare completely covered telehealth services for 60% of respondents. [4]
  • The implementation of a telemedicine program was associated with 11% cost savings and an estimated return on investment of $3.30 return for every $1 spent to implement the program. [4]
  • 2021 telehealth statistics show that telehealth is utilized for 13% to 17% of U.S. patient visits across all specialties, according to McKinsey & Company. [4]
  • The number of telehealth visits increased by 50% in the first quarter of 2020 compared to the first quarter of 2019, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [4]
  • Telehealth trends have stabilized at 38 times higher than before the pandemic, according to McKinsey & Company. [4]
  • The 154% increase in telehealth visits during the last week of March 2020, compared with the same period in 2019 might have been related to pandemic related telehealth policy changes and public health guidance. [10]
  • Average weekly percent changes in encounter count were calculated using Joinpoint Regression Analysis Software .Figure 1). [10]
  • Most telehealth encounters were for adults aged 18–49 years (66% in 2019 and 69% in 2020) and female patients (63% in both 2019 and 2020). [10]
  • During the early pandemic period in 2020, the percentage of telehealth visits for persons aged 18–49 years increased slightly, from 68% during the first week of January 2020 to 73% during the last week of March. [10]
  • There was a slight decrease in the percentage of telehealth encounters for children during the emerging pandemic period, compared with the same period in 2019. [10]
  • An average of 3.5% of encounters were for children aged <5 years in 2020 (compared with 4.0% in 2019), and 8.6% were for those aged 5–17 years in 2020 (compared with 10.0% in 2019). [10]
  • During January–March 2020, most telehealth patients (93%). [10]
  • However, the proportion of COVID19–related encounters grew (from 5.5% to 16.2%; p<0.05). [10]
  • During 2020, referral patterns were consistent during the early pandemic period; the increases or decreases in referral categories between weeks 1–9 and weeks 10–13 were <1%. [10]
  • Overall, an estimated 41%–42% of U.S. adults reported having delayed or avoided seeking care during the pandemic because of concerns about COVID 19, including 12% who reported having avoided seeking urgent or emergency care. [10]
  • Telehealth visits were up 154% in the last week of March 2020 compared with the same period the previous year. [6]
  • ( 48% of physicians now say they are treating patients via telemedicine. [6]
  • 48% of physicians now say they are treating patients via telemedicine. [6]
  • ( Telehealth use by rural health centers increased during the pandemic, peaking at 54% in the last week of April. [6]
  • Use declined to 26.7% by October — still well above the 0.4% reported in 2019. [6]
  • Telehealth use by rural health centers increased during the pandemic, peaking at 54% in the last week of April. [6]
  • ( Investors poured $9.4 billion into digital health startups through Q3 of 2020, with an estimated $12 billion in total investment by the end of the year. [6]
  • That’s a 46% investment increase over the previous record of $8.2 billion for 2018. [6]
  • Investors poured $9.4 billion into digital health startups through Q3 of 2020, with an estimated $12 billion in total investment by the end of the year. [6]
  • ( Deals are getting larger, with an average deal size of $30.2 million in 2020, up from $19.7 million in 2019 — a whopping 53% increase. [6]
  • Deals are getting larger, with an average deal size of $30.2 million in 2020, up from $19.7 million in 2019 — a whopping 53% increase. [6]
  • The number of patients reporting at least one telehealth visit has increased by 57% since the start of the pandemic. [6]
  • Patients with chronic illnesses report a 77% increase in the use of telehealth. [6]
  • ( Nearly half (43.5%) of Medicare beneficiaries’ primary care visits were provided via telehealth in April of 2020. [6]
  • Compare that to the 0.1% utilization before the public health emergency. [6]
  • Nearly half (43.5%). [6]
  • ( During the pandemic, most telehealth patients were adults between the ages of 18 and 49 (69%), and female (63%). [6]
  • During the pandemic, most telehealth patients were adults between the ages of 18 and 49 (69%), and female (63%). [6]
  • ( 93% of patients say they would be likely to use telemedicine to manage prescriptions. [6]
  • 93% of patients say they would be likely to use telemedicine to manage prescriptions. [6]
  • ( 83% of patients say they are likely to continue using telemedicine after COVID. [6]
  • 83% of patients say they are likely to continue using telemedicine after COVID. [6]
  • ( 28% of patients surveyed said they would like to access telehealth whenever possible, even if their insurance did not cover it. [6]
  • 28% of patients surveyed said they would like to access telehealth whenever possible, even if their insurance did not cover it. [6]
  • ( In a survey of more than 1 million patients, 89% would recommend their provider after having had a telemedicine visit. [6]
  • In a survey of more than 1 million patients, 89% would recommend their provider after having had a telemedicine visit. [6]
  • ( 77% of patients surveyed said they were very or completely satisfied with the virtual care they received. [6]
  • 77% of patients surveyed said they were very or completely satisfied with the virtual care they received. [6]
  • ( 75% of patients surveyed said they expect virtual care to be a standard part of their care moving forward, with 50% indicating they would switch providers to have virtual care visits on a regular basis. [6]
  • 75% of patients surveyed said they expect virtual care to be a standard part of their care moving forward, with 50% indicating they would switch providers to have virtual care visits on a regular basis. [6]
  • ( 74% of patients would use telemedicine to see a doctor with whom they already have a relationship, and 55% would use it to see a new doctor. [6]
  • 74% of patients would use telemedicine to see a doctor with whom they already have a relationship, and 55% would use it to see a new doctor. [6]
  • 91% of patients say telemedicine would help with appointment or prescription compliance ; and a study of rheumatology patients showed that shifting to telehealth during the pandemic significantly reduced cancellations and no. [6]
  • 91% of patients say telemedicine would help with appointment or prescription compliance. [6]
  • The number of physicians reporting telehealth as a skill increased by 38% in 2020, up from a 20% increase each year between 2015 and 2018. [6]
  • Women were 10% more likely than men to use telemedicine in their medical practice in 2019 and 24% more likely in 2020. [6]
  • ( Among physicians who provide telehealth services, 64% say they conduct visits from home. [6]
  • Among physicians who provide telehealth services, 64% say they conduct visits from home. [6]
  • ( 57% of providers say they now view telemedicine more favorably than before the pandemic, and 64% say they are more comfortable using telemedicine. [6]
  • 57% of providers say they now view telemedicine more favorably than before the pandemic, and 64% say they are more comfortable using telemedicine. [6]
  • By April of 2020, nearly all primary care physicians (97%). [6]
  • ( 75% of cardiology outpatient encounters shifted to telehealth within just two weeks. [6]
  • 75% of cardiology outpatient encounters shifted to telehealth within just two weeks. [6]
  • ( Among behavioral and mental health clinicians, 94% said they would like to continue offering these services virtually after the pandemic. [6]
  • Among behavioral and mental health clinicians, 94% said they would like to continue offering these services virtually after the pandemic. [6]
  • ( Among patients, 48% said they would use telemedicine to seek care for allergy, ear, nose, or throat conditions, 45% for routine preventive care, and 45% for mental or behavioral health care or counseling. [6]
  • Among patients, 48% said they would use telemedicine to seek care for allergy, ear, nose, or throat conditions, 45% for routine preventive care, and 45% for mental or behavioral health care or counseling. [6]
  • ( 73% of physicians said they would like to continue offering chronic disease management visits to patients via telehealth after COVID. [6]
  • Other virtual services they planned to continue included medical management (64%), care coordination (60%), and preventive care (53%). [6]
  • 73% of physicians said they would like to continue offering chronic disease management visits to patients via telehealth after COVID. [6]
  • 52% of patients said they encountered at least one barrier that made it hard to access telehealth, and 35% said they experienced at least one technology issue. [6]
  • ( Households with incomes of $50K or greater were 45% more likely to have broadband internet access than households with incomes less than $25K. [6]
  • Households with incomes of $50K or greater were 45% more likely to have broadband internet access than households with incomes less than $25K. [6]
  • ( Around 45% of patients prefer to use their cell phones for telehealth visits, while 39% prefer laptops. [6]
  • Around 45% of patients prefer to use their cell phones for telehealth visits, while 39% prefer laptops. [6]
  • ( 69% of patients say easyto use technology would make them more likely to choose telemedicine services. [6]
  • 69% of patients say easyto use technology would make them more likely to choose telemedicine services. [6]
  • ( In a survey of physicians, 69% said lack of patient access to technology would be a barrier for patient telehealth use. [6]
  • Other factors include lack of digital literacy by the patient (61%), lack of patient access to broadband or internet connection (58%). [6]
  • In a survey of physicians, 69% said lack of patient access to technology would be a barrier for patient telehealth use. [6]
  • Vidyo Telehealth Adoption Survey 2019 [3], 46% of surveyed health care providers use live videoconferencing, and 41% employ RPM to deliver medical care. [11]
  • Among patients who are willing to use connected health, 61% say they’d use it for convenience and faster service, and 54% say they’d use it to save money. [11]
  • 12% of respondents have already used a telehealth service for something related to COVID. [11]
  • 73% of respondents say they would consider using a telehealth service if they felt they had COVID. [11]
  • 2019 Physician Survey [5] shows, 340,000 – 590,000 US physicians are estimated to use telehealth technology by 2024. [11]
  • Physicians who have already used telehealth technology in practice note that telemedicine solutions 66% of patients are willing to use virtual care, and 8% have tried it, according to the Telehealth Index 2019 Consumer Survey [6]. [11]
  • According to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. Telehealth Satisfaction Study [7], telehealth consumers say their entire experience took an average of 44 minutes. [11]
  • 84% of telemedicine users were able to completely resolve their medical concerns during their virtual visit, and 73% did not experience problems during their service. [11]
  • 74% of millennials prefer telehealth visits to in person doctor exams. [7]
  • Up to 89% of patients are willing to accept telemedicine as a sufficient form of medical care. [7]
  • 85% of patients who receive telemedicine services are satisfied with their medical care. [7]
  • When compared with inoffice visits, virtual healthcare visits were regarded by 62.6% of patients and 59% of clinicians to be just as effective as in. [7]
  • 52.5% of clinicians report more effective treatment with virtual healthcare visits vs in. [7]
  • 93% of clinicians believe that telehealth is an “acceptable” method and 60% believe it is a “very effective” method of patient care overall. [7]
  • 89% of clinicians report telemedicine as at least a satisfactory method of follow up care for patients. [7]
  • 5% of virtual healthcare visits result in the need for an in. [7]
  • Banner Health’s Ambulatory Care program, which involves telehealth, reduced hospitalizations by 49.5% and 30 day readmissions by 75% in the first year. [7]
  • Virtual health visits implemented with veterans led to 25% fewer days spent in inpatient care and 19% fewer hospital admissions. [7]
  • 93% of telepsychiatry patients feel that they can present the same information over the phone as they can at a faceto. [7]
  • 96% of telepsychiatry patients are satisfied with virtual mental healthcare. [7]
  • 85% of telepsychiatry patients are comfortable with their ability to share with a mental health professional in a virtual environment. [7]
  • Implementing a telehealth platform can increase patient recruitment and retention by 81.5%. [7]
  • 82% of consumers view digital options as the best way to monitor health. [7]
  • Telemedicine can reduce the costs of doctor visits by 10. [7]
  • In Maryland, Frederick Memorial Hospital’s 2016 virtual healthcare platform rollout reduced the cost of patient care by 50%. [7]
  • Remote health monitoring in one diabetes cohort resulted in better outcomes and estimated cost savings of $3,855 per patient per year. [7]
  • Banner Health’s Ambulatory Care program, which involves telehealth, reduced overall costs by 34.5% in the first year. [7]
  • 40% of telehealth encounters have reported technical challenges. [7]
  • In some cases, poor audio (19%), poor video (13%), and audio interruption (9%). [7]
  • Only 20% of telemedicine practitioners have in house security officers and typically rely on external security vendors. [7]
  • Technical barriers to telehealth include lack of bandwidth (19%) and cybersecurity (15%). [7]
  • From 2016 through 2019, the use of telehealth in some medical specialties doubled from 14% to 28%. [7]
  • In the five years preceding 2019, telemedicine had grown by 44%. [7]
  • In 2019, 66% of consumers were willing to try virtual health exams, 8% already had, and two thirds were using personal health monitoring devices . [7]
  • In 2019, 22% of practitioners used telemedicine to examine patients versus only 5% in 2015. [7]
  • In 2019, the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs reported a 17% increase of telehealth services to veterans over the prior fiscal year. [7]
  • Overall patient volume decreased by 41% in the first two weeks following the implementation of telemedicine in response to the novel Coronavirus in 2020. [7]
  • A year ago, we estimated that up to $250 billion of US healthcare spend could potentially be shifted to virtual or virtually enabled care. [2]
  • After an initial spike to more than 32 percent of office and outpatient visits occurring via telehealth in April 2020, utilization levels have largely stabilized, ranging from 13 to 17 percent across all specialties. [2]
  • We are also seeing a differential uptake of telehealth depending on specialty, with the highest penetration in psychiatry and substance use treatment. [2]
  • Around 40 percent of surveyed consumers stated that they believe they will continue to use telehealth going forward—up from 11 percent of consumers using telehealth prior to COVID. [2]
  • Moreover, our research shows between 40 and 60 percent of consumers express interest in a set of broader virtual health solutions, such as a “digital front door” or lowercost virtual. [2]
  • On the provider side, 58 percent of physicians continue to view telehealth more favorably now than they did before COVID 19, though perceptions have come down slightly since September 2020. [2]
  • As of April 2021, 84 percent of physicians were offering virtual visits and 57 percent would prefer to continue offering virtual care. [2]
  • However, 54 percent would not offer virtual care at a 15 percent discount to in. [2]
  • For example, 56 percent of counties in the United States are without a psychiatrist, 64 percent of counties have a shortage of mental health providers, and 70 percent of counties lack a child psychiatrist. [2]
  • Many of these dynamics are likely to be in place for at least the next 12 to 18 months, as concerns about COVID 19 remain until a vaccine is widely available. [2]
  • Furthermore, up to 35 percent of regular home health attendant services could be virtualized, and 2 percent of all outpatient volume could be shifted to the home setting, with tech. [2]
  • Overall, these changes add up to $250 billion in healthcare spend in 2020 that could be shifted to virtual or near virtual care, or 20 percent of all office, outpatient, and home health spend across Medicare, Medicaid, and commercially insured populations. [2]
  • These solutions can also make healthcare more efficient; evidence prior to COVID 19 shows that telehealth solutions deployed for chronic populations can improve total cost of care by 2 to 3 percent. [2]
  • A total of 330 participants were included (response rate 85.7%). [12]
  • About 90% of surveyed healthcare executives report that their organizations have already begun developing or implementing a telemedicine. [5]
  • About 84% of surveyed healthcare executives felt that the development of telemedicine services is either very important (52%) or important (32%). [5]
  • About 22% of employers with 1,000 or more employees currently offer telemedicine services, and another 37% of employers plan to offer telemedicine services to their employees by the end of this. [5]
  • Telehealth statistics show about 74% of patients in the U.S. would use telehealth services9. [5]
  • Most patients are comfortable with having all of their health records securely available on the cloud.10 About 74% of patients are comfortable with communicating with their doctors using technology instead of seeing them in person.10. [5]
  • About 76% of patients care more about access to healthcare than need for human interactions with their healthcare providers.11 Only 16% of patients would prefer to go to the emergency room for a minor ailment if they also could access telemedicine services.12. [5]
  • About 67% of patients said that using telemedicine somewhat or significantly increases their satisfaction with medical care.12. [5]
  • According to a study on the Geisinger Health Plan, patient readmissions were 44% lower over 30 days and 38% lower over 90 days, compared to patients not enrolled in the telemedicine program.11. [5]
  • About 21% of patients who have used telemedicine services say the quality of care was similar to or higher than an in. [5]
  • When asked what the top benefit of telemedicine was, about 19% of surveyed health system respondents said it was the ability to provide roundthe. [5]
  • about 18.4% said it was the ability to provide remote consultations to patients.14. [5]
  • Almost 75% of all doctor, urgent care, and ER visits are either unnecessary or could be handled safely and effectively over the phone or video.13. [5]
  • In one survey, 21% of patients said not having to travel to the doctor. [5]
  • visit was the top benefit of telemedicine, while 20% said it was the ability to be cared for from their homes.12. [5]
  • About 53% of patients said that telemedicine somewhat or significantly increases their involvement in treatment decisions. [5]
  • The Geisinger Health Plan study found that implementation of a telemedicine program generated about 11% in cost savings during that study period. [5]
  • This led to an estimated return on investment of about $3.30 in cost savings for every $1 spent on program implementation.11. [5]
  • Telehealth Saves Doctors Money About 20% of Americans live in rural areas without easy access to primary care or specialist medical services.11. [5]
  • According to a 2021 Health and Human Services report, the number of telehealth visits among Medicare beneficiaries in 2020 was about 63 times higher than in 2019. [13]
  • Members of the LGBTQ+ community have also been more likely—by 25%— to utilize telehealth for mental health services compared to non LGTBQ+ peers since the start of the pandemic. [13]
  • According to the FCC, 6% of the total U.S. population—roughly 19 million people— live without access to the minimum fixed broadband speeds, an essential tool for utilizing telehealth services. [13]
  • Over one year, 24% of women, on average, scheduled at least one telemedicine appointment compared to 19% of men. [13]
  • Among women who have received telemedicine care, 62.8% said it was comparable to in. [13]
  • 25.9% said it was better than in person appointments according to a CirrusMD study. [13]
  • More than 70% of women rated their telehealth experience with mental health services as very good or excellent. [13]
  • In no health care category did ratings of fair or poor surpass 15%. [13]
  • A Kaiser Family Foundation survey found 38% of women respondents skipped routine check ups and tests during the pandemic, with women in fair or poor health skipping at the highest rates. [13]
  • About 46% of women in fair or poor health were more likely to have skipped routine care than women who reported being in good or excellent health. [13]
  • About 27% of women in fair or poor health have reported worsening conditions. [13]
  • Prior to the pandemic, just 13% of women between the ages of 50 64 ever had a telehealth appointment, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey. [13]
  • Between March and December of 2020, that number rose to 42%. [13]
  • The top reasons women sought telehealth appointments were for minor illness or injury (21%), management of a chronic condition (18%), and mental health services (17%). [13]
  • According to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey, less than 10% of telehealth appointments for women were for COVID. [13]
  • Additionally, according to CirrusMD, more than 25% of their study respondents stated they sought a telehealth appointment because they did not believe their issue required in. [13]
  • According to a CirrusMD survey, more than 50% of women reported that scheduling conflicts with health care providers delayed care. [13]
  • About 23% of respondents cited financial hardship due to missing work as a reason for missing an appointment. [13]
  • The survey also found that 62% of women said they would delay care less often if text based telehealth services were available and would most frequently use them to questions that arise between regular appointments. [13]
  • Almost 80% of surveyed women telehealth users said they would consider using telehealth services to consult with their OB/GYN in between regular appointments. [13]
  • According to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey, 86% of OB/GYNs said they did not conduct telehealth visits before March 2020. [13]
  • Just three months later, 84% reported having telehealth offerings. [13]
  • 6 Key Statistics About Millennials and Telemedicine Millennials, the generation that makes up 25 percent of the US population, love snacks Netflix and, of course, their phones. [14]
  • In fact, according to Nielson, more than 98 percent of Millennials own a smartphone, 83 percent claim to sleep with it and. [14]
  • The question, then, is how can healthcare reach Millennials when 28 percent don’t have a primary care provider and another roughly 40 percent don’t have a relationship with their primary?. [14]
  • Hospitals with a significant mortality reduction were more likely to have large annual admission volumes and be located in urban areas compared with other hospitals. [8]
  • Currently, 76 percent of U.S. hospitals connect with patients and consulting practitioners at a distance through the use of video and other technology. [15]
  • According to the FCC, 34 million Americans still lack access to adequate broadband. [15]
  • And, there is a large digital divide, with almost 40 percent of those living in rural areas lacking access. [15]

I know you want to use Telemedicine Software, thus we made this list of best Telemedicine Software. We also wrote about how to learn Telemedicine Software and how to install Telemedicine Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Telemedicine Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Telemedicine statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. fshealth – https://www.fshealth.com/blog/29-statistics-about-telemedicine-healthcare.
  2. modalitysystems – https://www.modalitysystems.com/hub/blog/telemedicine-statistics.
  3. mckinsey – https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/telehealth-a-quarter-trillion-dollar-post-covid-19-reality.
  4. medicaleconomics – https://www.medicaleconomics.com/view/four-new-statistics-that-prove-that-telemedicine-isn-t-just-a-pandemic-fad.
  5. singlecare – https://www.singlecare.com/blog/news/telehealth-statistics/.
  6. evisit – https://blog.evisit.com/virtual-care-blog/36-telemedicine-statistics-know.
  7. wheel – https://www.wheel.com/companies-blog/master-guide-to-telehealth-statistics-in-2020.
  8. getstream – https://getstream.io/blog/telemedicine-statistics/.
  9. nih – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26765148/.
  10. beckershospitalreview – https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/telehealth/7-stats-that-show-how-americans-used-telehealth-in-2021.html.
  11. cdc – https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6943a3.htm.
  12. scnsoft – https://www.scnsoft.com/blog/telemedicine-statistics.
  13. nih – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34221467/.
  14. cirrusmd – https://www.cirrusmd.com/7-statistics-how-women-have-used-telehealth-during-pandemic.
  15. medialogic – https://www.medialogic.com/blog/healthcare-marketing/6-key-statistics-millennials-telemedicine/.
  16. aha – https://www.aha.org/factsheet/telehealth.

How Useful is Telemedicine

One of the key benefits of telemedicine is its convenience. It allows patients to access healthcare services from the comfort of their own homes, reducing the need for travel and in-person visits to healthcare facilities. This can be especially valuable for individuals in remote or rural areas, or those with mobility issues or transportation barriers.

Furthermore, telemedicine can also help alleviate pressure on healthcare systems by reducing wait times and streamlining services. With the ability to consult with a healthcare provider virtually, patients can receive timely care and diagnoses without having to wait weeks for an appointment. This can ultimately lead to better health outcomes for patients, as timely intervention is often crucial in promoting positive health outcomes.

In addition, telemedicine can also improve access to specialists and enhance coordination of care. With video consultations and electronic health records, healthcare providers can easily share information and consult with colleagues across different locations, ensuring that patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care. This is especially important for individuals with complex medical conditions that require input from multiple specialists.

Another key benefit of telemedicine is its cost-effectiveness. By reducing the need for in-person visits and hospitalizations, telemedicine can help reduce healthcare costs for both patients and providers. This can be especially important for individuals with chronic conditions who require frequent monitoring and follow-up care, as telemedicine can provide a more cost-effective solution for managing their health.

It is also important to mention the potential of telemedicine in improving patient outcomes through increased patient engagement and self-management. With the ability to monitor vital signs, track symptoms, and communicate with healthcare providers remotely, patients can take a more active role in managing their health and adhere to treatment plans. This can lead to better outcomes and a higher quality of life for patients, especially those with chronic conditions who require ongoing monitoring and support.

While telemedicine certainly has its advantages, it is not without its limitations. One of the main challenges of telemedicine is ensuring patient privacy and data security, as confidential medical information is being transmitted through digital channels. Additionally, cultural and language barriers can also pose challenges in telemedicine consultations, as communication is primarily conducted through technology rather than face-to-face interactions.

Overall, the usefulness of telemedicine cannot be understated. It has the potential to revolutionize the way healthcare is delivered and accessed, offering convenience, cost-effectiveness, and improved patient outcomes. As technology continues to advance and implementation barriers are addressed, telemedicine is poised to play a significant role in shaping the future of healthcare delivery.

In Conclusion

Be it Telemedicine benefits statistics, Telemedicine usage statistics, Telemedicine productivity statistics, Telemedicine adoption statistics, Telemedicine roi statistics, Telemedicine market statistics, statistics on use of Telemedicine, Telemedicine analytics statistics, statistics of companies that use Telemedicine, statistics small businesses using Telemedicine, top Telemedicine systems usa statistics, Telemedicine software market statistics, statistics dissatisfied with Telemedicine, statistics of businesses using Telemedicine, Telemedicine key statistics, Telemedicine systems statistics, nonprofit Telemedicine statistics, Telemedicine failure statistics, top Telemedicine statistics, best Telemedicine statistics, Telemedicine statistics small business, Telemedicine statistics 2024, Telemedicine statistics 2021, Telemedicine statistics 2024 you will find all from this page. 🙂

We tried our best to provide all the Telemedicine statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Telemedicine statistics.




Leave a Comment