Rental Payment Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
Last updated: 
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Are you looking to add Rental Payment to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Rental Payment statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Rental Payment stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Rental Payment statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Rental Payment have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Rental Payment? We will answer all your Rental Payment related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Rental Payment Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 789 Rental Payment Statistics on this page 🙂

Rental Payment Market Statistics

  • According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 Rental Housing Finance Survey, individual investors made up the largest percentage of the housing market. [0]
  • The report shows that on average, monthly fair market rent on a 3bedroom property requires 38.6 percent of an average salary, while a monthly house payment on a median priced home requires 36.6 percent. [0]
  • According to Zillow research, the median U.S. rent takes 29.1 percent of the typical household income and renters in 34 of the nation’s 35 largest markets spend a larger share of income on rent now than they did historically. [0]
  • In 66% of housing markets, buying is more affordable than renting. [1]
  • Ibis World The market size is expected to decline by 5.9% this year. [2]
  • Meaning, the total market share of the US renting market sits at 36.6%, just slightly lower than the 37% back in 1965. [2]
  • Rental statistics by city suggest that rents on onebedroom apartments are going up in Las Vegas by nearly 4.9% per month, making it the fastest growing market in the country. [2]
  • That figure has gone up by more than 50% during a ten year period between 2007 and 2017, suggesting that the housing market is still booming, despite the credit crunch of 2008–2010. [2]
  • According to data from Zillow, reported in Fortune Magazine, the US residential rental market value is now $485 billion per year. [2]
  • Vacation rental industry statistics reveal that there are now more than 23,000 vacation rental companies in the US, comprising more than 20% of the global market. [2]

Rental Payment Latest Statistics

  • Those first results, measured through payments made during the first five days of April, showed 69.2 percent of renters in the dataset had made a full or partial payment. [3]
  • For example, the data then showed that by the end of that first month, the percentage of residents who made a rent payment moved from 69.2 percent to 94.6 percent by the end of the month. [3]
  • The last report from December 2021 found that 92.0 percent of renters made a full or partial payment, based on 11.8 million renters nationwide. [3]
  • This compared with 93.8 percent in 2020 and 95.9 percent in 2019. [3]
  • That means about 7.1% of 1040 filers could potentially be landlords. [4]
  • [Source US Census & Landlordology] Of the approximately 50 million rental housing units in the United States, around 41% of the rental units are owned by mom and pop landlords, also known as individual investor landlords. [4]
  • The value of those properties isn’t necessarily through the roof 40% of landlords own less than $200,000 worth of property, and an additional 30% fall in the $200,000. [4]
  • Only 30% of landlords own properties worth $400,000 or more, with 7% at the top owning properties worth $1 million or more. [4]
  • 45% of landlords manage their own properties – just north of the 44% that don’t manage the properties they own, instead hiring someone or outsourcing property management to a third party. [4]
  • The remaining 11% consists of landlords that manage, but don’t own their properties. [4]
  • In total, investors scooped up 18.4% of the available inventory. [4]
  • When it comes to single property landlords, 50% of them didn’t initially buy it as an investment property. [4]
  • On average, prices went up 16% between January 2021 and December 2021. [4]
  • The average increase comes in at 31%, a rise that would give a property that was rented out for $1,000 a month in 2010 a cost of $1,310 a month today. [4]
  • While the number of households behind in rent payments is below peaks of about 19%, approximately 5,843,000 households aren’t current, owing a combined total of around $15.13 billion. [4]
  • That leads to a profit of just $10,538 per year, a profit margin of just 30.8%. [4]
  • While the exact number of vacancies varies over time, approximately 5.6% of units were considered vacant as of Q4 2021. [4]
  • This is far less than the most recent peak, which reached 11.1% in Q3 of 2009. [4]
  • It’s actually fairly close to the lowest low, which was about 5% in the early 1980s. [4]
  • While the vast majority (89%). [4]
  • However, 13% of landlords actually handle that burden after being contacted by a tenant. [4]
  • However, 48.7% of landlords have actually requested that a tenant break their lease and head for the door sooner. [4]
  • Overall, 66% of landlords graduated from college. [4]
  • Additionally, 56% are at least 35 years old. [4]
  • While there’s no rule saying exactly when a landlord has to collect rent, 75% of landlords say the 1st of the month is when they require payment. [4]
  • However, when it comes to rent, 78% of landlords collect personal checks from tenants. [4]
  • Only 10% rely on bankto bank transfers, and a mere 7% use payment services like PayPal or Zelle. [4]
  • One surprising option is credit cards, a payment method that 5% of landlords use. [4]
  • During a typical year, 41% of properties experience some kind of vacancy. [4]
  • While it may seem like a standard screening tactic, 16% of landlords never run criminal background checks on their tenants. [4]
  • Possibly more surprising is that 10.3% don’t check a tenant’s credit as part of the process. [4]
  • Only 37.6% and 38.7% of landlords always check a tenant’s criminal background and credit history, respectively. [4]
  • Among individual investor landlords, approximately 30% fall in the lowto. [4]
  • Among landlords with household earnings under $50,000 annually, around 20% of their income comes from rent payments. [4]
  • In comparison, among households earning more than $200,000, rental income typically represents just 5% of their total household earnings. [4]
  • When it comes to affordable housing, landlords operating 2to 50 unit buildings are the most likely to fill that niche, providing most of the affordable housing stock in the country. [4]
  • Of the 48.3 million rental units in 2017, 48% of the units were in properties1 with 1to 4 units, most of which are owned by individuals and run by the owners. [5]
  • Individuals are the main types of owners of rental housing, accounting for 41% of the owners of all rental units. [5]
  • However, in properties with 1unit and 2to4 units, individual owners accounted for 72.5% of all owners. [5]
  • In 42.3% of all rental properties, the dayto day managers are the owners. [5]
  • In properties with 1unit, 71% of those doing the dayto day management were the owners. [5]
  • In properties with 2to 4units, 77% of the those doing the dayto day management were owners. [5]
  • Nearly half (48%). [5]
  • The share of 1 unit properties with debt is lower, at 39.2%. [5]
  • Of properties with 150 or more units, 80.7% of the units have a mortgage. [5]
  • Of all rental units, 16.3% had tenants that received rental assistance in 2017. [5]
  • In properties with at least 5 units, more than 25% of tenants receive Section 8 rental assistance. [5]
  • If that is inflation to 3% inflation cost per year, that is equivalent to $830 in 2020 dollars. [5]
  • 35%of households live in rental properties. [6]
  • Over 10 years, rental rates increased31%. [6]
  • 41%of renters spend more than35%of their income on rent. [6]
  • 42.9 million or 34.5% of U.S. households rent their homes. [6]
  • Rentership among households declined 3.8% from 2019 to 2020. [6]
  • The size of the average renting household declined 5.2% in 2020. [6]
  • 100.9 million people live in rental housing, a 7.4% decline yearover. [6]
  • 48,248 or 0.11% of rental homes are rent controlled. [6]
  • 5.5% of renters have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • 34.4% of renters are under the age of 35. [6]
  • 16.5% are aged 65 years and older. [6]
  • 86.4% of renters are high school graduates or equivalent. [6]
  • 64.1% of renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino. [6]
  • 51.8% of renters are Caucasian, 20.3% are Black or African American, and 19.7% are Hispanic or Latino. [6]
  • Totals will not add up to 100% due to overlapping ethnic and racial demographic parameters. [6]
  • Rent controlled units are most likely to be single units followed by those on properties with 150 units or more. [6]
  • The average renter spends 30.99% of their income on rent. [6]
  • 41.61% of renting households have an annual income below $35,000. [6]
  • 16.50% have an income of $75,000 or more. [6]
  • 12.34% of renters spend $2,000 or more per month on rent. [6]
  • 8.66% of renters pay less than $500 for rent. [6]
  • 5.22% of renters pay no cash rent, including Section 8 households. [6]
  • The rate of renters paying no cash rent increased 7.7% in 2020. [6]
  • 19.65% of renters identify as Hispanic or Latino. [6]
  • 20.25% of renters are Black or African American. [6]
  • Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander is the least common racial demographic among renters at 0.23%. [6]
  • 28.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 13.32% of millennial renters say they will always rent because they will never be able to afford to buy a home. [6]
  • In 2019, 8.28% of millennial renters indicated they would never be able to afford to buy a home. [6]
  • 13% of millennial renters across the US will be able to afford a traditional 20% down payment within the next five years. [6]
  • 18.12% of occupied rental properties were constructed in the 21stCentury. [6]
  • 44% of rental properties are suburban. [6]
  • 41% of rentals in the U.S. are urban. [6]
  • 26% of renters live in detached single family homes. [6]
  • 18% of renters live in buildings with fewer than 10 units. [6]
  • 18% of renters live in a building with 50+ units. [6]
  • 17% live in buildings with 10. [6]
  • 1.87% of occupied rental units have no heat. [6]
  • In the average state, 34.17% of all households rent. [6]
  • 4.84% of renters in the average state pay no rent. [6]
  • 35.96% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 16.83% of renters are aged 65 or older. [6]
  • West Virginia also has the highest rate of renters who pay 0% rent. [6]
  • Maryland 29.3% $1,425 Massachusetts 32.3% $1,449 Michigan 22.7% $908 Minnesota 21.2% $1,070 Mississippi 28.1% $779 Missouri 28.0% $841 Montana. [6]
  • 26.7% $870 Nevada 39.5% $1,229 New Hampshire 22.0% $1,179 New Jersey 32.9%. [6]
  • Tennessee 30.1% $907 Texas 32.6% $1,113 Utah 24.0% $1,158. [6]
  • Vermont 23.5% $1,007 Virginia 30.1% $1,269 Washington 32.2% $1,401. [6]
  • West Virginia 23.2% $723 Wisconsin 26.2% $872 Wyoming 22.7% $800. [6]
  • 29.07% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $800, down 0.87%. [6]
  • 1.75% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month to rent their home. [6]
  • 9.70% of renting households pay no cash rent. [6]
  • 35.2% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 15.7% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 20.7% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 5.3% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (52.2%) and Black or African American (42.6%). [6]
  • Alaska has the highest rate of American Indian and Alaska Native rentership in the nation; it’s over 50% higher than in South Dakota. [6]
  • 32.66% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,203, up 0.17%. [6]
  • 9.92% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month to rent their home. [6]
  • 8.76% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 36.7% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 7.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 23.7% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 2.5% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (64.5%), Caucasian (59.8%), and American Indian and Alaska Native (15.9%). [6]
  • 32.87% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,149, up 4.36%. [6]
  • 7.39% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.82% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 35.6% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 25.0% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 2.8% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (75.8%), Caucasian (52.1%), and Hispanic or Latino (30.6%). [6]
  • 32.41% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $760, up 2.43%. [6]
  • 1.29% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 10.24% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 37.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.8% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 17.7% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 3.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (67.4%), Caucasian (63.4%), and Black or African American (24.7%). [6]
  • 43.84% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,661, up 2.91%. [6]
  • 33.49% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.44% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 30.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 17.4% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 32.6% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 6.8% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (59.4%), Caucasian (36.9%) and Hispanic or Latino (36.9%). [6]
  • 33.21% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,401, up 2.34%. [6]
  • 15.23% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.73% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 42.2% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 8.9% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 35.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 2.3% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (80.4%), Caucasian (63.1%), and Hispanic or Latino (23.8%). [6]
  • 34.01% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,217, up 3.40%. [6]
  • 12.61% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.83% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 28.7% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 14.7% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 28.8% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 6.0% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (64.6%), Caucasian (51.8%), Hispanic or Latino (24.5%), and Black or African American (17.9%). [6]
  • 27.98% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,133, up 1.52%. [6]
  • 5.00% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.60% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 36.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.3% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 26.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 3.4% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (52.2%), Caucasian (43.7%), and Black or African American (38.4%). [6]
  • 59.60% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • 36.87% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 1.61% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 41.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 54.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are Black or African American (47.5%), White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (41.7%), and Caucasian (36.9%). [6]
  • 31.72% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,270, up 2.58%. [6]
  • 11.88% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.40% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 29.6% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 12.9% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 27.2% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (69.2%), Caucasian (43.9%), Hispanic or Latino (31.1%), and Black or African American (21.8%). [6]
  • 34.47% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,080, up 2.96%. [6]
  • 5.42% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.08% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 35.9% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 14.1% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 26.9% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 3.5% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are Black or African American (46.2%), White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (43.9%), and Caucasian (39.0%). [6]
  • 35.23% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,704, up 3.21%. [6]
  • 37.34% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 6.34% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 29.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 8.2% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 29.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 7.3% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (33.7%), Caucasian (28.8%), Asian (28.5%), and Two or More Races (17.4%). [6]
  • 27.25% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $923, up 4.89%. [6]
  • 2.87% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 7.61% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 42.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 10.2% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 22.0% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (86.5%), Caucasian (78.8%), and Hispanic or Latino (13.5%). [6]
  • 33.20% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,065, 4.41%. [6]
  • 9.23% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.35% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 35.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 11.9% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 31.8% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 5.4% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (60.5%), Caucasian (51.0%), Black or African American (25.4%), and Hispanic or Latino (16.5%). [6]
  • 28.61% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $850, up 1.19%. [6]
  • 1.88% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 6.05% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 37.2% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 12.8% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 20.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 3.6% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (72.3%), Caucasian (68.0%), and Black or African American (19.7%). [6]
  • 27.54% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • 2.32% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 6.84% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 41.9% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 9.9% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 22.5% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 4.3% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (82.8%), Caucasian (77.5%), and Black or African American (9.4%). [6]
  • 32.49% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $877, up 1.74%. [6]
  • 2.51% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.75% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 40.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 10.1% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 25.7% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 3.0% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (77.4%), Caucasian (69.5%), and Hispanic or Latino (11.5%). [6]
  • Rent prices are lower than they are in 90% of states, and renters are less educated. [6]
  • 31.64% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $795, up 2.85%. [6]
  • 1.61% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 9.06% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 36.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 14.3% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 19.7% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (78.6%), Caucasian (75.6%), and Black or African American (15.7%). [6]
  • 31.51% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $866, a 0.00% change. [6]
  • 2.05% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 10.33% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 35.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 18.2% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 5.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (47.9%), Black or African American (46.9%), and Caucasian (43.3%). [6]
  • 25.54% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $903, 3.79% YoY. [6]
  • 3.68% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 10.90% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 32.2% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 9.5% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 25.6% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 6.6% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (93.7%), Caucasian (92.3%), and Black or African American (2.5%). [6]
  • 33.11% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,425, up 1.71%. [6]
  • 18.09% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.24% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 30.0% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 12.1% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 34.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 4.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are Black or African American (43.8%), White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (43.3%), and Caucasian (39.2%). [6]
  • 37.66% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,449, 6.54%. [6]
  • 27.14% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.67% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 32.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.0% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 37.8% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (70.3%), Caucasian (60.6%), and Hispanic or Latino (18.7%). [6]
  • 26.78% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $908, up 2.25%. [6]
  • 3.33% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.24% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 11.5% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 23.1% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 4.4% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (64.2%), Caucasian (60.6%), and Black or African American (26.9%). [6]
  • 26.12% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,070, up 5.31%. [6]
  • 63.28% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.91% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 38.1% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 10.0% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 30.1% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (73.6%), Caucasian (69.7%), and Black or African American (13.8%). [6]
  • 29.84% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $779, up 0.26%. [6]
  • 0.46% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 13.51% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 32.9% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 17.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 16.6% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 6.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are Black or African American (55.8%), White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (40.9%), and Caucasian (39.2%). [6]
  • 32.08% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $841, 0.84%. [6]
  • 2.68% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 6.59% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 37.6% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 11.8% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian or Hispanic or Latino (71.1%), Caucasian (68.5%), and Black or African American (21.5%). [6]
  • Rental prices are lower than average, and renters are more likely to be under 35 years old. [6]
  • 30.06% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $854, up 2.77%. [6]
  • 3.26% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 10.21% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 41.1% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 6.1% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 28.0% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (85.6%), Caucasian (82.5%), and American Indian or Alaska Native (8.2%). [6]
  • Most renters are under 35 and a little less likely to have a college degree. [6]
  • 32.34% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $870, up 1.28%. [6]
  • 6.81% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 41.7% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 4.9% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (82.0%), Caucasian (73.7%), and Hispanic or Latino (11.3%). [6]
  • 41.08% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,229, up 5.22%. [6]
  • 7.19% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.40% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 30.8% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 21.2% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 2.1% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (61.3%), Caucasian (46.9%), Hispanic or Latino (26.3%), and Black or African American (16.0%). [6]
  • 26.75% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,179, up 2.79%. [6]
  • 7.79% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.90% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 31.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 9.3% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 28.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 5.1% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (91.0%), Caucasian (87.3%), and Hispanic or Latino (5.7%). [6]
  • 36.34% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,394, up 1.31%. [6]
  • 17.60% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.13% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 26.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.7% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 32.1% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 7.4% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (57.1%), Caucasian (39.4%), Hispanic or Latino (28.5%), and Black or African American (22.9%). [6]
  • 29.81% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $834, down 1.53%. [6]
  • 1.95% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 9.62% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 35.8% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 15.2% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 26.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 5.2% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (74.7%), Hispanic or Latino (44.3%), and Caucasian (40.7%). [6]
  • 44.90% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,358, up 3.74%. [6]
  • 23.59% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 3.46% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 28.6% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 15.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 34.9% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 15.6% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (53.7%), Caucasian (44.3%), Hispanic or Latino (25.1%), and Black or African American (22.2%). [6]
  • 32.80% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $943, up 1.29%. [6]
  • 3.29% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 7.06% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 36.1% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.2% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 26.5% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (56.3%), Caucasian (60.7%), and Black or African American (34.0%). [6]
  • 35.33% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $748, down 6.97%. [6]
  • 2.72% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 6.43% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 48.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 7.7% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 24.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (77.4%), Caucasian (74.7%), and Black or African American (7.6%). [6]
  • 32.78% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $831, up 2.21%. [6]
  • 2.35% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.21% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 12.2% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 21.8% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 2.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (68.8%), Caucasian (65.7%), and Black or African American (24.0%). [6]
  • 31.99% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $811, down 0.37%. [6]
  • 1.82% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 9.25% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 38.9% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 13.5% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 19.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (66.6%), Caucasian (58.8%), and Black or African American (13.0%). [6]
  • 36.64% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,239, up 4.56%. [6]
  • 10.37% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.38% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 3.1% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (82.3%), Caucasian (74.2%), and Hispanic or Latino (13.0%). [6]
  • 30.58% of households rent their home. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $979, up 2.94%. [6]
  • 6.21% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 5.70% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 34.2% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 27.0% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 6.2% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (70.7%), Caucasian (65.7%), and Black or African American (19.0%). [6]
  • Renters are 21.6% more likely to be high school dropouts than renters in any state. [6]
  • 31% of households rent their home. [6]
  • 24.8% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 21.4% are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 20.8% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 20.7% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are Hispanic or Latino (98.3%), White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (57.2%), and Black or African American (12.0%). [6]
  • 21.3% of renters identify as another, unspecified race. [6]
  • 35.44% of households rent their home. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,069, up 2.49%. [6]
  • 7.31% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.25% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 28.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 5.9% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (74.0%), Caucasian (63.6%), and Hispanic or Latino (21.0%). [6]
  • 28.28% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • 3.60% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 10.29% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 34.6% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 20.9% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (51.6%), Caucasian (48.3%), and Black or African American (41.3%). [6]
  • 29.14% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $724, down 5.85%. [6]
  • 1.08% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 8.29% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 9.4% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 23.3% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (78.8%), Caucasian (75.5%), and American Indian or Alaska Native (10.5%). [6]
  • 32.84% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $907, up 0.33%. [6]
  • 3.72% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 7.74% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 37.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 14.0% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 23.4% of renters have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (65.0%), Caucasian (60.5%), and Black or African American (28.6%). [6]
  • 36.98% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,113, up 2.02%. [6]
  • 7.25% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.97% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 39.3% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 15.5% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 2.9% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (65.7%), Caucasian (37.6%), Hispanic or Latino (35.6%), and Black or African American (20.7%). [6]
  • 28.68% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,158, up 5.46%. [6]
  • 5.76% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.37% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 48.4% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 8.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 26.7% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 1.8% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (83.4%), Caucasian (71.3%), and Hispanic or Latino (18.1%). [6]
  • Renting is less popular with households and renters are more likely to be over the age of 65. [6]
  • 27.39% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,007, up 2.76%. [6]
  • 6.97% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 7.36% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 32.7% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (90.4%), Caucasian (88.7%), and Black or African American (4.1%). [6]
  • 33.44% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,269, up 1.20%. [6]
  • 16.22% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.99% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 34.3% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (57.8%), Caucasian (51.8%), and Black or African American (29.6%). [6]
  • 36.28% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $1,401, up 3.09%. [6]
  • 20.13% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 4.24% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 9.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 32.4% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (71.3%), Caucasian (64.4%), and Hispanic or Latino (13.1%). [6]
  • 25.83% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $723, down 0.55%. [6]
  • 0.95% of rent paying households pay $2,000 or more per month in rent. [6]
  • 15.57% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 34.9% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 15.5% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • 7.5% of renting households have lived in their home for more than 20 years. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (89.3%), Caucasian (88.8%), and Black or African American (7.3%). [6]
  • 31.47% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $872, 0.58% YoY. [6]
  • 4.87% of occupied units are not rent. [6]
  • 24.5% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (77.5%), Caucasian (72.6%), and Black or African American (12.8%). [6]
  • 25.92% of households rent their homes. [6]
  • The median gross rent is $800, down 2.68% YoY. [6]
  • 42.5% of renters are under 35 years old. [6]
  • 5.6% of renters are not high school graduates. [6]
  • 24.2% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. [6]
  • The largest racial demographics among renters are White, including Caucasian, Hispanic or Latino (89.4%), Caucasian (80.8%), and Hispanic or Latino (11.5%). [6]
  • The residential rental industry employs 834,000 as of February 2021, a 1.1% decline from February 2020. [6]
  • Residential rentals employ 67.5% of the real estate rental industry and 49.2% of the real estate industry overall. [6]
  • 382,400 or 45.9% of residential rental industry employees are women. [6]
  • Wages for the average employee increased 1.03% over the previous year. [6]
  • Comparing the average renter ResidentScore year over year, we noted scores declined by 14 points, or 2%. [0]
  • Sacramento, California continues to experience the highest rent growth with an increase of 9.3 percent. [0]
  • On the state level, Idaho experienced the fastest annual growth at 4.9 percent. [0]
  • The Pew Research Center’s analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data shows that more U.S. households are renting than at any point in 50 years, with 36.6 percent of households renting their home. [0]
  • was in 1965, with a rate of 37 percent. [0]
  • The recent numbers include groups that have been traditionally less likely to rent, such as adults aged 45 to 64. [0]
  • Around 65 percent of renters do so due to financial reasons, while 32 percent rent as a matter of choice. [0]
  • TransUnion SmartMove data shows that in 2016 2017, 28 percent of SmartMove applicants had a criminal hit on their record. [0]
  • However, multi family properties only had a criminal hit rate of 21 percent. [0]
  • Zillow reported that the median U.S. rent accounts for 29.1% of a typical household income, up from 25.8% in 2000. [0]
  • According to Pew Research Center, 72.5 percent of landlords are private landlords or individual investors who only own between one and four units. [7]
  • The figure means that 7.1 percent of US residents earn some money as landlords. [7]
  • A fascinating statistic reveals that 47 percent of landlords hold on to a property because it has sentimental value. [7]
  • This startling statistic means that 82 percent of the 2 million evicted persons fell behind on rent payments. [7]
  • Thirty six percent of US households rent a house or apartment Of the 122.8 million households in the US, around 36 percent pay rent to a landlord rather than own a home. [7]
  • Surprising statistics show that 60.6 percent of renters are low income renters in the lowest income quartile. [7]
  • This figure drops to 41.8 percent for renters in the second quartile (25 – 49.9%). [7]
  • Only 10.5 percent of the wealthiest individuals in the country rent a home. [7]
  • Over 80 percent of renters want an answer within 24 hours. [7]
  • If you are a landlord in Delaware, you could increase rent by 12.21 percent in 2021. [7]
  • Due to increased pressure, 60 percent of landlords decided to hire a property owner. [7]
  • According to the US Census website, 94 percent of rental units were occupied in 2021, whereas 6 percent were vacant. [7]
  • Of those that decide to move, 86 percent stay within the state. [7]
  • Tenant screening results in 14 percent of rental applications being rejected. [7]
  • According to statistics, millions of Americans are paying more than 30 percent of their income on rent. [7]
  • Over 17 million are considered “severely cost burdened” because 50 percent of their monthly income goes on housing. [7]
  • It can be a tough time to be a tenant when nearly 35 percent of your earnings go on rent. [7]
  • CNBC reports that in New York, the figure rises to a shocking 40 percent. [7]
  • Nearly 30 percent of tenants were facing eviction for nonpayment of rent after the eviction moratorium ended During the middle of 2021, nearly 30 percent of tenants were facing eviction when moratoriums ended. [7]
  • Over 35 percent of the survey is collected by mail. [8]
  • Available to download in PNG, PDF, XLS format 33% off until Jun 30th. [9]
  • The average homeowners insurance premium rose by 3.1 percent in 2018, following a 1.6 percent increase in 2017, according to a January 2021 study by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, the latest data available. [10]
  • The average renters insurance premium fell 0.6 percent in 2018 marking the fourth consecutive annual decline. [10]
  • Renters insurance premiums fell 2.7 percent in 2017. [10]
  • Fortythree percent of homeowners said they had an inventory in the 2020 Triple I Consumer Poll. [10]
  • The survey showed that homeowners in the South and West were more likely to have a home inventory , followed by homeowners in the Northeast and Midwest. [10]
  • In 2019, 5.1 percent of insured homes had a claim, according to ISO. [10]
  • Property damage, including theft, accounted for 97.2 percent of homeowners insurance claims in 2019. [10]
  • In 2019, 5.1 percent of insured homes experienced a claim, compared with 6.2 percent in 2018. [10]
  • Homeowners insurance losses, net of reinsurance, rose to $63.8 billion in 2020 from $54.2 billion in 2019, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. [10]
  • Property damage 96.1% 96.% 97.6% 97.7% 97.% Wind and hail .5 33.4 41.0 36.3 34.3 Water damage and freezing 4.4 9.0 18.7 3.7 9.4 Fire and lightning 3.7 6. 3. 30. 5.1 Theft 1.9 1.9 1.1 1.0 1.0. [10]
  • . . 7. Liability 3.9% 3.8% 2.% 2.3% 2.8% Bodily injury and property damage 3.7 3. 2.2 2.1 2. Medical payments and other 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0. Credit card and other. [10]
  • Total 00.0% 00.0% 00.0% 00.0% 00.0%. [10]
  • In the fiveyear period, 2015 2019, 5.7 percent of insured homes had a claim. [10]
  • Wind and hail accounted for the largest share of claims, with 2.5 percent of insured homes having such a loss, followed by water damage and freezing with 1.9 percent of homes having a loss. [10]
  • The cost of living rose 4.7 percent in 2021. [10]
  • The cost of motor vehicle insurance increased 3.8 percent after a 4.6 percent decline in 2020, when drivers reduced their driving due to the COVID. [10]
  • The cost of tenants and household insurance declined slightly, down 0.3 percent. [10]
  • Used cars and trucks increased a significant 26.6 percent and the median price of a single family home increased 17.7 percent and nearly 100 percent since 2012. [10]
  • 150.3 0.9% 131.3 3.1% 198.7 NA 303.5 2.0% 177 6.5%. [10]
  • 4.8% NA 23.4% 99.4% December 996=00. [10]
  • The U.S. homeownership rate was 65.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2021, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. [10]
  • The 2010 Census showed that in some of the largest cities renters outnumbered owners, including New York, where 69.0 percent of households were occupied by renters, followed by Los Angeles , Chicago and Houston. [10]
  • Year Homeowners Percent change Renters. [10]
  • Rank Group/company Direct premiums written Market share State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance $,046,55 8.4%. [10]
  • Homeowners Insurance Industry Underwriting Expenses, 2020 Expense Percent of premiums Losses and related expenses. [10]
  • Loss and loss adjustment expense ratio 77.0% Incurred losses 67.5. [10]
  • Defense and cost containment expenses incurred 1.8 Adjusting and other expenses incurred 7.7 Operating expenses Expense ratio 28.%. [10]
  • Combined ratio after dividends 105.9%. [10]
  • As a percent of net premiums earned. [10]
  • As a percent of net premiums written. [10]
  • There were 113,500 deaths from unintentional home injuries in 2020, up 21.1 percent from 2019. [10]
  • The number of unintentional home injury deaths has increased by 272 percent since 1999, largely due to increases in unintentional poisonings and falls. [10]
  • However, the number of policies in FAIR plans peaked in 2011 and had been falling steadily through 2018, down 49.7 percent from 2011 to 2018, while exposure dropped by 54.6 percent. [10]
  • In 2019 the downward trend ended and from 2018 to 2020, total policies grew 10.1 percent while exposure grew 30.8 percent. [10]
  • In 2020, 66.6 percent of housing units were owner occupied and. [10]
  • 33.4 percent were renter occupied, according to the latest U.S. Census figures. [10]
  • In 2019, 32.1 percent of owner occupied units housed people age 65 and over. [10]
  • The same year, 16.2 percent of rental units housed people over age 65. [10]
  • The nation’s homeowners paid a median of $1,510 monthly housing costs in 2019, compared with $1,301 for renters, according to the latest American Housing Survey from the Census. [10]
  • However, renters usually paid a higher percentage of their household income on these costs than did owners, 45.1 percent compared with 26.5 percent of homeowners who spent 30 percent or more of their income on housing costs in 2019. [10]
  • State Percent Rank State Percent Rank Alabama 74.8% 4 Montana 68.4% 33 Alaska 64. 44 Nebraska 69.8. [10]
  • 74.2 8 Wyoming 73.9 9 Missouri 71.1 19 United States 66.6%. [10]
  • States with the same percentages receive the same rank. [10]
  • In 2020 West Virginia, Delaware, Maine, Alabama and Minnesota had the highest percentage of owner. [10]
  • State Percent Rank State Percent. [10]
  • Rank Alabama .6% 35 Montana 8.9% 0 Alaska 7. 6. [10]
  • States with the same percentages receive the same rank. [10]
  • In 2019, Hawaii, California, New Jersey and Florida had the highest homeownership costs, based on the percentage of homes in which owners spent 30 percent or more of their income on homeowner. [10]
  • North Dakota, Indiana, Iowa and Kansas had the lowest costs, based on the percentage of homes in which owners spent 30 percent of more of their income on homeowner. [10]
  • Rank Alabama 40.9% 35 Montana 4.% 33 Alaska 4.0 34 Nebraska 38.4 47 Arizona 43.4 Nevada 48. 5. [10]
  • Percent of renter occupied units spending 30 percent or more on rent and utilities such as electric, gas, water and sewer, and fuel. [10]
  • Nationwide, 45.1 percent of renters spent at least 30 percent of their household income on rent and utilities in 2019. [10]
  • In 2019 North Dakota, South Dakota, West Virginia and Kentucky had the lowest percentage of rental units in which occupants spent 30 percent or more of their income on rent. [10]
  • In the year 2016, 27% of Americans rented their homes. [1]
  • 48,248 (0.11%). [1]
  • The median U.S. rent accounts for 29.1% of the average American household income. [1]
  • 57.9% of respondents own their homes outright. [1]
  • 32.8% of respondents purchased their homes between the ages of 24 and 34. [1]
  • The majority of respondents (18%). [1]
  • 22.4% of respondents have an exceptional credit score, while other studies show that most renters only have a fair credit score. [1]
  • In our survey, 7.7% of respondents had a fair credit score. [1]
  • Most people (9.9%). [1]
  • According to Apartment Guide in June 2021, New York City, NY has thehighest rentin the nation. [1]
  • In 2015, 74.4% of rental properties were owned by individual investors and not corporations. [1]
  • Less than one third (28%). [1]
  • 49% of American renters are under 30. [1]
  • 77% of the people in the US prefer to rent instead of buying a home. [1]
  • Rent prices nationwide increased by almost 50% from 2007 to 2017. [1]
  • Only 37% of renters have renter’s insurance. [1]
  • 17% of renters live in a duplex. [1]
  • 81% of economistsdisagree that rent control policies have had a positive impact over the past three decades on the amount and quality of broadly affordable rental housing. [1]
  • Commercial real estate prices rose at a 1.4% annual rate from September 2019 to 2020. [1]
  • 54% of respondents reported an increase in missed, late, or partial payments for industrial, retail, and office spaces. [1]
  • 65.8% of Americans own their homes outright. [1]
  • The homeownership rate was 3.8% points higher than the rate in the second quarter of 2019 and 2.6% points higher than the rate in the first quarter of 2020. [1]
  • In the second quarter of 2019, the Black homeownership rate dropped to 40.6%. [1]
  • 95% of homeowners had Homeowners Insurance Owning a medianpriced three bedroom home in the United States is more affordable than renting one. [1]
  • In 2019, 37.1 million households were considered “housing cost burdened,” which means they spent 30% or more of their income on rent. [1]
  • There isn’t a single county in the United States that can fill 100 percent of its low income population’s needs for safe and affordable housing. [1]
  • 80% of millennials would like to eventually own a home. [1]
  • 38.5% of people who find themselves 35 and younger are homeowners. [1]
  • 12.3% of millennial renters plan to “always rent.”. [1]
  • 25% of millennial renters will be able to afford a 10% down payment on a median priced home in the next 5 years. [1]
  • If student debt obligations were dismissed, this would improve to 38% nationally, and more than 50% in some metropolitan areas. [1]
  • 88% of millennials believe homeownership is important for personal success. [1]
  • Millennial homeownership rates have fallen 20% in the past 10 years. [1]
  • In the latter half of 2020, 89.1% of Americans rented their homes, according to iPropertyManagement. [1]
  • According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, there were 43.6 million rent based households in America. [1]
  • According to investors, if you make at least a $100 profit on a rental property, then it is worth the time and effort to sink money into the property. [1]
  • Although $50 billion in emergency rental assistance funding may seem like a large amount, it is likely not enough to improve the financial situation for renters, many of whom were struggling before the pandemic. [11]
  • Of those 7.5 million renter households, the researchers estimated in October 2020 that 1.4 million would owe back rent by January 2021. [11]
  • Stout, using November data, estimated 7 to 14.2 million households would owe back rent by January. [11]
  • The methodology assumes renters would miss only 50 percent of their rent, and those with the highest rent burden would be the first to miss this rent payment. [11]
  • According to the National Bureau of Economic Research , the U.S. economy entered a recession in December 2007, from which it started to recover in June 2009. [12]
  • Most evident is the trend in the West, where the homeownership rate grew by 1 percentage point each year from 1998 to 2003 , where it generally remained through 2008. [12]
  • This was the largest sustained percentage point increase in homeownership rates over the 1995–2015 period. [12]
  • Monthly mortgage payments rose more than 42 percent from 2004 to 2007 , and fell 17 percent by 2015 in the West. [12]
  • The rise is least apparent in the Northeast, where mortgage payments peaked a year later in 2008, but rose less than 20 percent over this period , and fell less than 7 percent by 2015. [12]
  • Nationally, mortgage payments rose 29 percent from 2004 to their peak in 2008, and fell less than 10 percent by 2015. [12]
  • Although rural homeownership rates varied without a discernable pattern between 1995 and 2015, the trend is clearly upward for urban consumers from 1995 to 2005–07 , and downward thereafter, returning to 1995 levels in 2014–15. [12]
  • As chart 4 shows, the trend in homeownership rates was more pronounced in central cities, rising to a peak of 53 percent in 2004 then falling to 47 percent in 2012–14. [12]
  • While other urban areas also experienced a decline from a peak of 73 percent to 68 percent , the slope of the decline was steeper for central city residents than for those in other urban areas. [12]
  • In addition, the Western cities experienced large changes in homeownership rates during this period ranging from 58 to 49 percent in Los Angeles, and 63 percent to 50 percent in San Francisco. [12]
  • In fact, the drop for San Francisco was the largest of any MSA shown. [12]
  • The homeownership rate rose only 2 percentage points from 2002–03 to 2008–09, after which it fell 5 percentage points by 2014–15. [12]
  • Expenditures for owned dwellings rose only 18 percent from 2002–03 to their peak in 2012–13 , after which they declined slightly in 2014–15. [12]
  • The 2014–15 peak was about 7 percent higher than the previous peak , but was up more than 13 percent from the previous level. [12]
  • Therefore, it is not surprising that chart 7, showing the percentage of renters by region, is the “mirror image” of chart 2, highlighting homeownership. [12]
  • As expected, the West shows the most variability in renter percentages, dropping steadily from 1996 through 2004, stabilizing through 2008, and then rising sharply afterward. [12]
  • Similarly, subtracting 100 from the index provides a measure of percent change from the base period. [12]
  • For example, the value of the nonhousing expenditures index in 2015 for homeowners with a mortgage is about 132, indicating these expenditures increased about 32 percent from 2004 to 2015. [12]
  • That is, while mortgage outlays were 29 percent higher in 2008 than 2004, incomes before taxes for homeowners with mortgages were only 16 percent higher in 2008 than 2004. [12]
  • At the same time, nonmortgage expenditures increased , but less than income. [12]
  • Although mortgage outlays never fell to 2004 levels, by 2011, they were 15 percent higher than they had been in 2004, while income was 16 percent higher. [12]
  • By 2015, both income and nonmortgage expenditures were about one third higher than they were in 2004. [12]
  • In that same year, mortgage outlays were 17 percent higher than they had been in 2004. [12]
  • As a result, by 2015, rent expenditures had increased 48 percent, while nonrent expenditures increased 34 percent. [12]
  • From 2004 to 2008, the share of income allocated to mortgage outlays increases nearly 2 percentage points, 14 to 16 percent, before falling to under 13 percent in 2015. [12]
  • Even with no increase in income, a young homeowner with a typical 30 year mortgage would be able to save over $30,000 more for retirement just by saving this 2 percent each year. [12]
  • At the same time, the share of income allocated to nonmortgage expenditures fell—from nearly 67 percent to about 64 percent by 2007, and rising slightly to 65 percent in 2008. [12]
  • The share continued to fall after the recession officially ended, bottoming out at 62 percent in 2010, before rising to 66 percent in 2015. [12]
  • Over all, the combined share reached its lowest point in 2010 when both nonmortgage expenditures and mortgage outlays were declining. [12]
  • The decline in mortgage outlays more than offset the increase in nonmortgage expenditures from 2010 onward, as the share in 2015 was still lower than it was in 2004. [12]
  • For renters, the share of income allocated to rent generally increased, albeit slowly, from 21 percent in 2004 to 23 percent in 2015. [12]
  • Nonrent expenditures accounted for 70 percent or more of income for most years between 2004 and 2008, but fell in 2009, the year in which the recession had technically ended. [12]
  • Nonrent expenditures stayed at about 67 percent each year from 2009 through 2011, returning to pre recession levels in 2012, and remaining there subsequently. [12]
  • According to NBER, that recession lasted from July 1981 to November 1982. [12]
  • Related to this, data from the Current Population Survey show that seasonally adjusted unemployment reached 10.1 percent in September 1982 and peaked at 10.8 percent in December before declining to 10.1 percent by June 1983. [12]
  • Thereafter, it was less than 10.0 percent until the recession that started in December 2007. [12]
  • While homeownership rates in the Northeast rose from 59 percent in 1997 to 65 percent in 2004–06, the climb was interrupted by a decrease in 2000, and a 3 year level period at 64 percent. [12]
  • First, dividing the average annual outlay by 12 yields an estimated monthly outlay of $600. [12]
  • Suppose further that homeowners account for 60 percent of consumer units in the region. [12]
  • Dividing the estimated average monthly outlay by the percentage of homeowners yields an estimated average outlay for homeowners for mortgages of $1,000 in this example. [12]
  • In fact, this increase is much less than in the 1994–95 to 2002–03 period, when expenditures rose from $531 to $766 per month, an increase of 44.2 percent, and over a shorter time. [12]
  • Although percent changes can be misleading in this context—a change from $1 to $2 to $3 is a 100percent change from the first to second period, and a 50 percent change for the second to third, but is a $1 change each year—. [12]
  • Historically, rental statistics show that anywhere between 30 and 40% of people rent properties instead of buying them; and for good reason too!. [2]
  • The average rent of a one bedroom apartment in the US fell by 2.01% in 2018. [2]
  • 70% of Americans live in single. [2]
  • 16% of low income renters cannot pay their rent in full every month. [2]
  • 43% of renters can’t afford to buy a home. [2]
  • Most economists expect rental prices to rise anywhere between 3 and 5% per year, slightly above the rate of inflation. [2]
  • Idaho is the state that saw the fastest annual growth of any in the union, with rentals going up by more than 4.9%. [2]
  • Rents are falling the fastest in Cleveland, Ohio, where they’re going down by 2.1% each month, and Santa Ana, California, where they’re declining by 1.75% per month. [2]
  • Data from Statista suggests that 39–50% of the money households earn every month goes on rent. [2]
  • New York and Los Angeles alone make up more than 8% of the total. [2]
  • The current rental vacancy rate is 7%, the lowest rate since the ‘80s. [2]
  • For instance, in the ‘70s, they hovered just above 5%, but this was a historical anomaly. [2]
  • Around 65% of all people under 35 rent their homes, reflecting the huge divide in wealth. [2]
  • The prevalence of homeownership in the under 35s group has fallen considerably since the noughties — a time when just 57% of people in that age group rented a property. [2]
  • In the 35–44 age group, 41% of people rent their homes, compared to just 28% in the 45–64 age range, and 21% in the 65 and over category. [2]
  • 38% of people under the age of 30 have a subprime FICO score compared to just 8% of those over the age of 70. [2]
  • The vast majority of Americans — some 70% — live in homes of this variety. [2]
  • Survey data also reveals that 53% of people would prefer to live “away from it all,” while 34% would prefer to be right in the middle of the action. [2]
  • 3.5% of the 252 million housing units in the US are second homes. [2]
  • Data shows that more than 3.5% of the country’s total housing stock entails second homes — mostly holiday homes for when wealthier segments of society want to take a break. [2]
  • 44% of these second homes are professionally managed, and between 25–35% of them are rented out regularly. [2]
  • Recent figures suggest that holiday rentals are increasing by more than 8.5% on average across the country, with the fastest growth in places like Florida and California. [2]
  • Thus, it was found that Manhattan had the highest share, followed by Los Angeles, which constituted 32% of household income. [2]
  • The survey showed that 68% of the respondents in the survey owned homes. [2]
  • 27% of the respondents were tenants who rented homes as their primary place of residence. [2]
  • As per the rental industry trends, 49% of the tenants were below 30 years. [2]
  • Similarly, only 9% of tenants were 65 years and older. [2]
  • They apply U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development definitions to identify renters who spend more than 30 percent of their pretax income on housing as “rent burdened” and those who spend more than 50 percent as “severely rent burdened.”. [13]
  • Because Larrimore and Schuetz find that the majority of renters in the top 80 percent of the income distribution are not rent burdened, they focus their research on renters in the bottom 20 quintile, for whom the rent burden problem is most pervasive. [13]
  • The median renter in this bottom group pays 56 percent of monthly income on rent. [13]
  • According to the SPM, a family of four in 2015 needed about $1,400 in residual income. [13]
  • The lowest income renters pay about half the median rent of the highest income renters, yet earn only 10 percent of the latter group’s income. [13]
  • White people, on average, are 50% more likely to own homes than people of other races. [14]
  • Real estate prices have risen as much as 73% since 2000. [14]
  • Romania has the highest rate in the world sitting at 96.4%. [14]
  • The national rate of homeownership in the US is 64.8%. [14]
  • First time buyers make up only 33% of all home buyers. [14]
  • The homeowner vacancy rate of 0.9% was 0.5 points lower than the rate in the 3rd quarter of 2019 (1.4%) and virtually unchanged from the rate in the 2nd quarter of 2020 (0.9%). [14]
  • The homeownership rate of 67.4% was 2.6 points higher than the rate in the 3rd quarter of 2019 (64.8%) and not statistically different from the rate in the 2nd quarter of 2020 (67.9%). [14]
  • The homeownership rate jumped to 67.9%, the highest since 2008’s 3rd quarter, from 65.3% in the prior quarter according to the Census Bureau. [14]
  • According to the records of this year, the homeownership rate for Black Americans rose since 2008, from 44% to 47%. [14]
  • The rate for Hispanics increased from 48.9% to 51.4%. [14]
  • This is the highest rate going back to 1994 according to the Census report. [14]
  • According to Pew Research Center, about 6 in 10 Latinos have experienced pay cuts and lost jobs in the pandemic and many said that they didn’t have emergency funds to pay for 3 months of expenses. [14]
  • Data from the US Census Bureau indicates the current rate in the US is 64.8%. [14]
  • This is an increase since the year 2016, which had a rate of 63.5%. [14]
  • Prior to 2016, the rate steadily declined; it was above 69% back in 2004. [14]
  • Romania has the highest homeownership rate in the world at 96.4%. [14]
  • In the American Midwest, 68.3% of people are homeowners, with the South coming in as a close second with 65.9%. [14]
  • The West has the lowest percentage in all the US with only 59.7%. [14]
  • White people, on average, are 50% more likely to own homes than other races. [14]
  • Whereas about 64% of white people own homes, only 47% of ethnic minorities are homeowners. [14]
  • The rate is lowest among black people (43%). [14]
  • Ownership amongst other minorities, including Asian Americans, is around 57%. [14]
  • Citizens aged 65 and over have remained relatively stable, with the highest level of homeownership at around 80%. [14]
  • Approximately one third (33%). [14]
  • Of the 33% of first time buyers, the majority are Millennials born between 1981 and 1996. [14]
  • 36.6% of households rent out their homes. [14]
  • Over a third of homeowners rent out their homes, an increase of 5.4% compared to 2016. [14]
  • The rental vacancy rate has also increased, up from 6.9% in 2009 to 7.2% in 2018. [14]
  • The average cost of rent has increased by 61%. [14]
  • Average rent payments over the past 50 years in most US have increased by 61%, making it much harder for first time buyers to get on the property ladder. [14]
  • Median rent income has increased by only 5%. [14]
  • Homeownership rate stats reveal real estate prices have risen as much as 73% since 2000. [14]
  • An interesting home ownership percentage almost 50% of renters live alone and just 22% are couples. [14]
  • Most renters live alone, with only 22% living as couples and the rest in groups of three or more. [14]
  • 65% of homes are owner occupied, according to the national US homeownership rate. [14]
  • In the UK, France, Germany, Sweden, and Switzerland, less than 50% of homes are owner. [14]
  • At only 10%, Nigeria in Africa has one of the lowest owner occupied housing rates in the world. [14]
  • 40%, a huge downgrade from 52%. [14]
  • The national vacancy rate of households in the US is just 1.6%. [14]
  • Very few homes sit empty in the US, as opposed to a slightly higher rate of 2.6% in the UK. [14]
  • The vacancy rate in the US has dropped since 2008 when it was as high as 2.8%. [14]
  • There was a minor dip in homeownership during the ‘80s, plateauing at 69.5% in the mid. [14]
  • The homeownership rates in the UK (65%), France (65%), New Zealand (64.8%), and Australia (65%) are similar to that of the US (64.8%). [14]
  • Some surprising rates include Switzerland with an extremely low rate of only 42.5% and Romania with an incredibly high rate of 96.4%. [14]
  • Romania has the highest rate in the world at 96.4% so high, in fact, that it was recently the focus of a BBC news article. [14]
  • Singapore has the second highest rate at 91%, slightly above Croatia, Slovakia, and Lithuania each with approximately 90%. [14]
  • Currently, the national rate is 64.8% according to the latest Census statistics. [14]
  • Recent rates on homeownership in the US peaked in 2004 at nearly 70%, steadily decreasing until 2016 when they hit a low of 62.9%. [14]
  • Between 1990 and 2015, the percentage of white homeowners dropped by 16%, whereas homeownership amongst Hispanics, Asian Americans, and African Americans all increased by 9%, 3%, and 2% respectively. [14]
  • What’s more, Asian Americans have the highest rate after white homeowners at a solid 57.6% (compared to their 73.7%). [14]
  • The rate amongst Millennials is 32.2%. [14]
  • Delayed marriage is noted as a significant factor in delaying homeownership, with statistics indicating that married couples are 18% more likely to purchase a home. [14]
  • Further statistics show that 54.8% of Millennials under the age of 24 still live at home with their parents. [14]
  • The percentage of US households owned free and clear is a fair 37% according to Bloomberg’s data analysis from Zillow. [14]
  • The past decade has seen a 5.5% rise in homeowners paying off their mortgages. [14]
  • In the US, amongst Baby boomers the rate is at its highest at 75%. [14]
  • In addition, 60% of Gen Xers own homes, and only 32.2% of Millenials are homeowners. [14]
  • First time buyers make up only 33% of all home buyers, the majority of which are Millennials as the homeownership rate in the US suggests. [14]
  • In the 3rd quarter of 2020, the Census Bureau reported that renter occupied housing units made up for 29.3% of the total housing inventory. [14]
  • In Europe, the homeownership rate by country shows that the Germans have the greatest proportion of renters and only 39% of the population makes up for homeowners compared to 60% in the UK. [14]

I know you want to use Rental Payment Software, thus we made this list of best Rental Payment Software. We also wrote about how to learn Rental Payment Software and how to install Rental Payment Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Rental Payment Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Rental Payment statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. mysmartmove – https://www.mysmartmove.com/SmartMove/blog/6-rental-statistics-landlords-need-know.page.
  2. thezebra – https://www.thezebra.com/resources/research/renting-statistics/.
  3. policyadvice – https://policyadvice.net/insurance/insights/rental-statistics/.
  4. nmhc – https://www.nmhc.org/research-insight/nmhc-rent-payment-tracker/.
  5. getflex – https://getflex.com/blog/landlord-statistics/.
  6. nar – https://www.nar.realtor/blogs/economists-outlook/landlord-statistics-from-the-2018-rental-housing-finance-survey.
  7. ipropertymanagement – https://ipropertymanagement.com/research/renting-statistics.
  8. rentdrop – https://www.rentdrop.io/blog/surprising-60-statistics-for-landlords-and-tenants-facts-for-2024.
  9. usda – https://www.nass.usda.gov/Surveys/Guide_to_NASS_Surveys/Cash_Rents_by_County/.
  10. statista – https://www.statista.com/statistics/532984/consumer-spending-rentals-for-housing-in-the-united-kingdom-uk/.
  11. iii – https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-homeowners-and-renters-insurance.
  12. urban – https://www.urban.org/urban-wire/many-people-are-behind-rent-how-much-do-they-owe.
  13. bls – https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-7/housing-and-expenditures-before-during-and-after-the-bubble.htm.
  14. bls – https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2018/beyond-bls/the-effects-of-the-rent-burden-on-low-income-families.htm.
  15. policyadvice – https://policyadvice.net/insurance/insights/home-ownership-statistics/.

How Useful is Rental Payment

First and foremost, the affordability of rental payments allows people to have access to housing options that might otherwise be unattainable. Not everyone can afford to purchase a property, especially as housing prices continue to rise. In such cases, renting becomes a favorable alternative for individuals and families seeking a place to call home. Rental payments accommodate a wide range of budgets and financial situations, providing opportunities for diverse segments of the population to find suitable housing.

Furthermore, renting offers flexibility and adaptability, which is particularly valuable in our fast-paced, ever-changing world. Renting allows us to have freedom in choosing where we want to live without the commitment that comes with owning a property. This flexibility enables individuals to relocate for job opportunities, family reasons, or even a change in lifestyle. By making rental payments, people can secure a temporary abode without being confined to a specific location or tied down by long-term financial obligations.

Another advantage of rental payments is the minimal maintenance responsibilities it entails. When renting a property, the landlord assumes most of the maintenance and repair duties, allowing tenants to dedicate their time and energy toward other aspects of their lives. This can be incredibly beneficial for individuals who have busy schedules or prefer not to deal with the intricacies of property upkeep. Rental payments provide a convenient option for those who value convenience and a hassle-free living experience.

By making rental payments, individuals also contribute to local economies and job creation. The real estate industry relies heavily on the rental market, employing a significant number of people involved in property management, maintenance, and related services. Essentially, rental payments support not only landlords but also the numerous individuals and businesses that thrive within this industry. Building a robust rental market helps stimulate economic growth by creating job opportunities and increasing overall consumer spending.

Moreover, rental payments contribute to ensuring a fair and inclusive society. Housing is a fundamental necessity, and the availability of rental options allows individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds to access suitable accommodation. Through rental payments, marginalized communities can secure homes and take part in mainstream society. Rental housing plays a crucial role in reducing homelessness and providing stability for those who may not have the means to purchase a property outright, creating an environment that promotes equal opportunities for all.

In conclusion, the usefulness of rental payments extends far beyond merely providing a place to live. It facilitates affordable housing options, offers flexibility and adaptability, reduces maintenance responsibilities, contributes to local economies, and fosters a fair and inclusive society. The importance of rental payments should not be underestimated, as they not only benefit individuals and families but have wide-reaching positive impacts on the overall community and economy.

In Conclusion

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