Screenwriting Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Are you looking to add Screenwriting to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Screenwriting statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Screenwriting stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Screenwriting statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Screenwriting have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Screenwriting? We will answer all your Screenwriting related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Screenwriting Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 415 Screenwriting Statistics on this page 🙂

Screenwriting Market Statistics

  • that were 41 50% minority were released in the most international markets in both 2018 and 2019. [0]

Screenwriting Software Statistics

  • Women earned 17.9% of all technical credits. [0]

Screenwriting Latest Statistics

  • When I ask agents, managers and writers for their guesses, their answers range from five to 20 percent. [1]
  • And since it’s better to err on the side of overestimating the competition, I’ll go with 20 percent. [1]
  • Twenty percent of one million is 200,000. [1]
  • And if we ask what percentage of these 200,000 people will launch and sustain a career, the answer would again be a hope. [1]
  • And 95 percent or so are in the decentto. [1]
  • Given these estimates, there are approximately 2,000 writers able to write really goodto great scripts, and another 8,000 writers who put out good scripts. [1]
  • Approximately 48 percent of these 10,000 writers are working, and 52 percent are not. [1]
  • Yet, the industry gatekeepers say 95 percent of the scripts they receive miss the mark. [1]
  • But for 95 percent of folks, the industry isn’t the problem. [1]
  • 95% of the scripts they read are horrible. [2]
  • 4% are average or just above. [2]
  • And maybe 1% are truly amazing. [2]
  • 5 Comments on What percentage of screenwriters write a second movie?. [3]
  • The standard is in the 40. [4]
  • 66% of speaking or named characters were male and 34% were female. [0]
  • Only 28% of all speaking characters in action films were girls and women, which was not meaningfully different. [0]
  • A similar pattern emerged for female characters in animation (33.3%). [0]
  • Only 14 of the 100 top movies in 2019 featured a genderbalanced (45% 54.9% of all speaking roles filled with girls/women). [0]
  • Women only filled 38.8% of speaking roles among 21. [0]
  • The findings were even more dire for women 40 years of age or older (25.4%). [0]
  • Women (41.6%) were more likely than men (31.3%). [0]
  • Women and girls of color represented 17% of leading/co leading roles. [0]
  • Nearly 80% of all LGBTQ characters were maleidentified and only 21.3% or 13 were female. [0]
  • The majority of characters with disabilities in 2019 were males (67.6%), White (66%), and 40 years of age or older (59.6%). [0]
  • Universal reached 50% in its depiction of female identified leads and co leads. [0]
  • This is a 13 year high, yet this percentage is still below the female population per the U.S. Census (51%) and the percentage of tickets sold at the box office in North America to females (47%). [0]
  • 17% of leading/co leading roles cast actors from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • Top grossing 100 films 40% featured female protagonists. [0]
  • 43% featured male protagonists, and 17% had ensembles or a combination of male and female protagonists. [0]
  • 45% of female protagonists appeared in studio features and 55% appeared in independent features. [0]
  • Sole male protagonists were more likely to appear in studio features (57%) than independent features (43%). [0]
  • Female protagonists were most likely to appear in horror features (26%), followed by dramas (24%), comedies (21%), action features (16%), science fiction features (8%), and animated features (5%). [0]
  • Females accounted for 37% of major characters. [0]
  • Females comprised 34% of all speaking characters. [0]
  • 16% of films featured 0 to 4 female characters in speaking roles, 48% had 5 to 9 females, and 36% had 10 or more females. [0]
  • The majority of female characters were in their 20s (22%) and 30s (31%). [0]
  • The majority of male characters were in their 30s (32%) and 40s (26%). [0]
  • Males 40 and over accounted for 47% of all male characters. [0]
  • Females 40 and over comprised 30% of all female characters. [0]
  • 17% of females were under 20, 22% were in their 20s, 31% were in their 30s, 16% were in their 40s, 8% were in their 50s, and 6% were in their 60s or older. [0]
  • 10% of males were under 20, 11% were in their 20s, 32% were in their 30s, 26% were in their 40s, 12% were in their 50s, and 9% were in their 60s or older. [0]
  • 21% of major female characters were under 20, 22% were in their 20s, 27% were in their 30s, 14% were in their 40s, 8% were in their 50s, and 9% were in their 60s. [0]
  • 68% of all female characters with speaking roles were White, 20% were Black, 5% were Latina, 7% were Asian, and 1% were of some other race or ethnicity. [0]
  • 68% of all female characters were White. [0]
  • 20% of all female characters were Black. [0]
  • 5% of all female characters were Latina in 2019. [0]
  • 7% of all female characters were Asian in 2019. [0]
  • 70% of major female characters were white, 18% were Black, 6% were Latina, and 5% were Asian. [0]
  • 46% of female characters but 34% of male characters had a known marital status. [0]
  • 73% of male characters but 61% of female characters had an identifiable job or occupation. [0]
  • A larger proportion of male than female characters were seen in their work setting, actually working (59% vs. 43%). [0]
  • Male characters were more likely than females to be seen in primarily work related roles (60% vs. 40%). [0]
  • Female characters were more likely than males to be seen in primarily personal life related roles (52% vs. 34%). [0]
  • Females comprised 26% of leaders, while males accounted for 74% of leaders. [0]
  • In films with at least one woman director and/or writer, females comprised 58% of protagonists. [0]
  • In films with exclusively male directors and/or writers, females accounted for 30% of protagonists. [0]
  • In films with at least one woman director and/or writer, females comprised 42% of major characters. [0]
  • In films with exclusively male directors and/or writers, females accounted for 35% of major characters. [0]
  • In films with at least one woman director and/or writer, females comprised 39% of all speaking characters. [0]
  • In films with exclusively male directors and/or writers, females accounted for 32% of all speaking characters. [0]
  • Women represented 44.1% of film leads and 40.2% of total actors. [0]
  • People of color comprised 27.6% of film leads and 32.7% of total actors. [0]
  • In 2018, films with casts that were 2130% minority enjoyed the highest median global box office receipts, while films with casts that were 41 50% minority enjoyed this distinction in 2019. [0]
  • Netflix films (48.4%) featured a significantly higher percentage of femaleidentified leads/co leads than 200 top grossing movies from 2018 and 2019 (41%). [0]
  • A non meaningful increase in female identified main cast members occurred over time (2018=38.9%, 2019=41.1%). [0]
  • Femaleidentified speaking characters in Netflix movies (36.1%). [0]
  • Film portrayed more underrepresented leads/co leads in 2019 (40.4%) than in 2018 (31.9%). [0]
  • Netflix films across two years featured significantly more underrepresented leads/co leads (35.7%). [0]
  • This was also the case in 2019, when Netflix outpaced top grossing fare (40.4% vs. 29%). [0]
  • Netflix=40.2%, TG Films=34.3%), though not overall or in 2018. [0]
  • Of film leads/co leads, 42.1% were white males, 30.2% were white females, 19% were underrepresented males, and 19% were underrepresented females. [0]
  • The only significant change over time was for underrepresented female identified film leads which jumped from 2018 (15.9%) to 2019 (22.8%). [0]
  • Netflix films were more likely than topgrossing films (12%). [0]
  • Netflix films showcased white men in 40.4% of speaking roles, compared to white females in 21.7%, underrepresented males in 23.1% and underrepresented females in 14.8%. [0]
  • In top grossing films, 43.4% of speaking characters were white males, 21.2% were white females, 22% were underrepresented males, and 13.3% were underrepresented females. [0]
  • Netflix films did not differ from top grossing movies (2%). [0]
  • 4.3% of main cast members were LGBTQ. [0]
  • Netflix films featured LGBTQ characters in 2% of all speaking roles, roughly equal to top. [0]
  • In film, 11.9% of leads/co leads were depicted with a disability, which increased over time (2018=8.7%, 2019=15.8%). [0]
  • However, Netflix featured slightly fewer leads/co leads with a disability than top. [0]
  • Fewer than 5% of film main cast (4.1%) were shown with a disability, which was stable over time (2018=3.4%, 2019=4.9%). [0]
  • Only 1.5% of speaking characters in film were depicted with a disability. [0]
  • Netflix films (1.5%) featured roughly the same percentage of characters with disabilities as top grossing movies (1.9%). [0]
  • Out of 1,300 top grossing movies, only 44 or 3.4% featured an API lead or co lead. [0]
  • Of the 51,159 speaking characters across the 1,300 top grossing films from 2007 to 2019, 5.9% were Asian, Asian American or Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. [0]
  • Disaggregating our API variable, the vast majority of characters were Asian or Asian American (94.6%). [0]
  • Only 15.7% of the 1,300 movies depicted proportional representation of the API community with U.S. Census (7.1%). [0]
  • In terms of invisibility, a full 39% of 1,300 movies erased API speaking or named characters altogether. [0]
  • Each year, 93% or more of the 100 top films across 13 years erased the NHPI community save three years 2015 (88%), 2017 (88%), and 2018 (88%). [0]
  • In terms of role of API characters, 23.6% were supporting and 72.5% were inconsequential to the plot. [0]
  • Males (63%) far outnumbered females (37%). [0]
  • 59.2% of the 1,300 movies did not depict a single API girl or woman speaking on screen. [0]
  • Only 19.6% of API women were 40 years of age or older. [0]
  • API women (43.9%) were more likely to be shown as parents than were API men (36.3%) and slightly more likely to be depicted in a committed romantic relationship (46.6% vs. 42.4%). [0]
  • API females were far more likely to be depicted in sexy clothes (23.3%), partially naked (21.3%) and referenced as physically attractive (8.2%) than were males (7%, 9.3%, 2.3% respectively). [0]
  • Only 26 API characters (1.9%). [0]
  • Under a fifth (19.2%). [0]
  • Top grossing 100 films 30% of Asian and PI characters were either tokenized as the only API character in the movie or isolated by never interacting with another API character. [0]
  • 67% of API primary and secondary characters fell into stereotyped tropes. [0]
  • In terms of the perpetual foreigner, nearly onefifth (18%). [0]
  • More than half (58%). [0]
  • Among Asian men, a subset (14.5%). [0]
  • A total of 41.8% of API characters experienced disparagement of some sort, six of which were racist/sexist slurs. [0]
  • In 2019, 20% of API primary and secondary characters were either sidekicks or villains. [0]
  • Only 12.6% of the Asian and PI characters in 2019 were multidimensional when it came to relationships. [0]
  • No differences by country emerged 5.6% of speaking characters in the Australian sample were Muslim, as were 1.1% of U.S., and 1.1% of U.K. characters. [0]
  • Of the 200 films, 9.5% or 19 had at least 1 Muslim character on screen. [0]
  • Muslim characters comprised 2% of all characters in action and adventure films. [0]
  • In comedy films, 2.5% of all speaking characters were Muslim. [0]
  • Few (1.5%). [0]
  • Of the 144 Muslim characters, 76.4% were male and 23.6% were identified as female. [0]
  • Muslim girls/women were most likely to appear on screen in 2019 (29.3%), followed by 2017 (22%), and 2018 (16.7%). [0]
  • A total of 15 films (7.5%). [0]
  • Of the 144 Muslim characters across the sample, 66.7% were Middle Eastern/North African , 20.8% were Asian, 5.6% were Black/African American, 4.2% were White, and 2.8% were Multiracial/Multiethnic. [0]
  • More than half of female Muslim characters were MENA (55.9%), while just over a quarter (26.5%). [0]
  • Fewer than 10% of female Muslim characters were Multiracial/Multiethnic (8.8%), White (5.9%,), or Black/African American (2.9%). [0]
  • The majority of Muslim characters on screen were young adults (48.9%). [0]
  • Roughly onethird of Muslim characters (34.3%). [0]
  • Only 4.4% of Muslim characters, or 6 characters, filled primary roles. [0]
  • In contrast, 25.5% of Muslim characters were in secondary and 70.1% were in tertiary roles. [0]
  • Across 1,300 movies and 1,387 leads/co leads, only 48 (3.5%). [0]
  • And yet, this identity group comprises 18.7% of the U.S. population and 49% of residents in Los Angeles. [0]
  • Over half (54.2%, n=26). [0]
  • Only 1.9% of all leads/co leads across 1,300 movies were Hispanic/Latino girls/women as were only 6.5% of all female protagonists. [0]
  • Only 10, or less than 1%, of the 1,300 films had a Hispanic/Latino actor 45 years of age or older as the lead/co lead. [0]
  • Of the 31 leading/co leading roles that featured Latinx actors, 64.5% were filled with girls and women and 35.5% were filled with boys and men. [0]
  • Only 31 or 2.2% of all 1,387 protagonists were Latinx. [0]
  • Across the 51,158 speaking or named characters evaluated, Hispanic/Latinos only comprise 5% of these roles. [0]
  • Examining population norms across the 50 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., 78.8% of these U.S. locations have more Hispanic/Latino residents than what we see across 1,300 feature films. [0]
  • Drilling down even further, each of the 25 most populous counties in the U.S. have a higher percentage of Hispanic/Latinos than Hollywood films. [0]
  • Only 20 films across the 1,300 film sample were within ±2 percentage points of the U.S. Census benchmark. [0]
  • Across five years and 500 films, 95.4% of films were missing a Hispanic/Latino character with disability. [0]
  • That means that 98.8% of films were devoid of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Hispanic/Latinos. [0]
  • Seven or 6.2% of all leads/co leads identified were cast with an actor of Hispanic or Latino descent. [0]
  • 5% of films featured leads/co leads with Latinx actors. [0]
  • Only two films depicted a cast of Hispanic/Latino characters proportional to the U.S. population (18.7%). [0]
  • More than a third (35%). [0]
  • Of the 500 top billed actors, 7.6% were Hispanic/Latino and appeared in 28 films. [0]
  • A full 82.1% of movies featured only one Hispanic/Latino actor in the top billed cast. [0]
  • Nearly onethird (31.6%). [0]
  • Nearly oneseventh (13.2%). [0]
  • This trait was more pronounced among top billed Hispanic/Latino characters (23.7%) than among all characters (8.5%). [0]
  • 29.2% of the 24 topbilled Hispanic/Latina girls/women were sexualized, while none of the top billed male Hispanic/Latino characters were. [0]
  • Among all characters, a similar gender difference emerged, as 26.5% of all Hispanic/Latina characters but 10% of Hispanic/Latino male characters were sexualized. [0]
  • 39.5% of top billed characters and 29.8% of all characters were portrayed as criminals. [0]
  • Although a single top billed character (6.7%). [0]
  • Of the top billed Hispanic/Latino characters shown as criminals, nearly half (40%, ). [0]
  • Although 24 of the 28 films examined (85.7%). [0]
  • Hispanic/Latino characters were shown as immigrants at a higher rate than in previous years across both top billed (13.2%, n=5) and all other Latino characters (8.5%, n=8). [0]
  • Nearly half (47.4%, n=18). [0]
  • 37.2% of all Hispanic/Latino characters , did not speak English or demonstrate a familiarity with the language, though none of them were top. [0]
  • Out of 97 characters that spoke one or more words of English overall, 27.8% spoke the language with an accent, indicating that Spanish was their first language. [0]
  • More than onefifth (23.7%, n=9) of the 38 top billed Latinos and almost a third (30.5%, n=18). [0]
  • 36.8% of top billed and 43.6% of all Hispanic/Latino characters were portrayed on screen without any references to their Latinidad across a variety of context cues. [0]
  • Seventeen top billed characters (44.7%). [0]
  • In only 26.6% of cases did Hispanic/Latino speaking or named characters make verbal remarks or appear amongst cultural symbols reflecting their Hispanic/Latino background. [0]
  • 50% of top billed Hispanic/Latinos were isolated and 51.1% of all Hispanic/Latino characters were never shown with family or other Hispanic/Latino community members. [0]
  • 41.7% of Hispanic/Latino characters were depicted with a job. [0]
  • Of the 56 Hispanic/Latino characters with an occupation, 47.3% were shown in a job that did not require a specialized education. [0]
  • A quarter (n=14, 25.5%). [0]
  • Only 12.7% depicted educated professionals. [0]
  • Finally, two characters (3.6%). [0]
  • Only 22.3% of all these top leadership positions were filled with women. [0]
  • Only 12 of these directors were women (10.7%). [0]
  • Women directed films featured stories with girls and women comprising 45.1% of all speaking roles and 83.3% of leading/co leading characters. [0]
  • For movies with only male directors, the respective percentages were 32.5% and 37.5%. [0]
  • 80.6% of screenwriters were men and only 19.4% were women. [0]
  • Almost a quarter of all producers (24.3%). [0]
  • 5.2% of all composers were women. [0]
  • 70.4% of all casting directors were women and 29.6% were men. [0]
  • In 2019, the percentage of girls and women on screen did not increase when a woman caster was attached to the film. [0]
  • 21.9% of speaking characters were Black girls/women when the top leadership job was held by Black directors. [0]
  • Only 4.4% of girls and women on screen were Black in films with directors from other racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • Asian directors were associated with a higher percentage of Asian speaking characters on screen (27.3%) as well as females from this racial group (7%) than non Asian directors (5.9% vs. 2%, respectively). [0]
  • 54.8% of casting directors were white women, 27.4% were white men, 15.6% underrepresented women and 2.2% underrepresented men. [0]
  • Underrepresented female casters were associated with films that featured more underrepresented characters on screen (45.8%) than films without an underrepresented female caster attached (30.7%). [0]
  • 2019 was the highest number and percentage of women directors (n=12, 10.7%). [0]
  • Only 88 (6%). [0]
  • Eighty were men (90.9%) and 8 were women (9.1%). [0]
  • 48 or 3% of directors were Asian. [0]
  • Of the top 200 films 2018 2019 Women represented 15.1% of directors, 17.4% of writers, and 18% of studio heads. [0]
  • People of color made up 14.4% of directors, 13.9% of writers, and 9% of studio heads. [0]
  • 25% of competition directors were women and 75% men. [0]
  • In 2019, 32% of narrative film directors were female. [0]
  • 21% percent were in 2018, and 24% in 2017. [0]
  • 35% of helmers were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • 65% of narrative competition directors were white. [0]
  • Nearly half (47%). [0]
  • White female directors were roughly a sixth of all helmers (17%). [0]
  • Only 1 of the 10 executives were from an underrepresented racial group (10%). [0]
  • Turning to top programmers or selection committees, a full 47% were female and 53% were male as of 2019. [0]
  • Only 21% of programmers were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups across these prestigious distribution platforms — 7% of programmers were men of color and 14% were women of color. [0]
  • At Sundance, TIFF, New York Film Festival, SXSW, Telluride, Tribeca, Palm Springs, Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival, and Slamdance from 2017 2019 Film Directors 71% of directors were male and 29% were female. [0]
  • A significant increase or 6 percentage point gain was observed from 2017 (25%) to 2019 (31%). [0]
  • 62% of directors were white and 38% were underrepresented. [0]
  • 2019 had a higher percentage of underrepresented directors (40%) than did 2017 (35%). [0]
  • Nearly half of all directors (45%). [0]
  • In terms of change over time, the percentage of white male directors has decreased 7 percentage points from 2017 (49%) to 2019 (42%). [0]
  • The three top North American film festivals for female directors of narrative features across 3 years were Tribeca (35% female directors), Sundance (34% female directors), and SXSW (33% female directors). [0]
  • The top three festivals for women of color directors were as follows Toronto (14% WOC directors), Seattle (14% WOC directors), and Palm Springs (13% WOC directors). [0]
  • Executives & Programmers 50% of the top executives were males and 50% were females. [0]
  • 85% were white and 15% were underrepresented. [0]
  • Of 236 individual programmers, 74% were Caucasian and 26% were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • 44% of programming teams were comprised of women. [0]
  • When these factors are crossed, the resulting statistics are as follows white males 43%, white females 31%, underrepresented males 13%, underrepresented females 13%. [0]
  • At the above film festivals from 2017 2019 The percentage of women of color directors increased as women of color programmers increased. [0]
  • When no women of color worked as programmers, 4% of directors were women of color. [0]
  • When three or more women of color were programmers, 13% of directors were women of color. [0]
  • A full 89.4% of the 113 directors were male and 10.6% were female. [0]
  • Of the topgrossing 1,300 films from 2007 2019 4.8% of directors were women. [0]
  • 2019 had a significantly higher percentage (10.6%) of female directors than 2018 (4.5%) or 2007 (2.7%). [0]
  • This is less than 1% of all directing jobs, whereas white males held 82.5% of jobs, underrepresented males 12.6% of jobs, and white females 3.9% of jobs. [0]
  • Women comprised 20% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and cinematographers. [0]
  • Women fared best as producers (26%), followed by editors (23%), writers (20%), executive producers (19%), directors (12%), and cinematographers (2%). [0]
  • 94% of films had no female composers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 31% of music supervisors. [0]
  • 82% of films had no female music supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 3% of sound designers. [0]
  • 97% of films had no female sound designers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 9% of supervising sound editors. [0]
  • 91% of films had no female supervising sound editors. [0]
  • Women comprised 15% of production designers. [0]
  • 85% of films had no female production designers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 34% of art directors. [0]
  • 66% of films had no female art directors. [0]
  • Women accounted for 4% of special effects supervisors. [0]
  • 97% of films had no female special effects supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 5% of visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • 88% of films had no female visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 21% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and cinematographers. [0]
  • Women fared best as producers (27%), followed by editors (23%), executive producers (21%), writers (19%), directors (13%), and cinematographers (5%). [0]
  • Almost one third or 31% of films employed 0 or 1 woman in the roles considered. [0]
  • 45% of films employed 2 to 5 women, 22% employed 6 to 9 women, and 2% employed 10 or more women. [0]
  • In contrast, 1% of films employed 0 or 1 man in the roles considered, 5% employed 2 to 5 men, 25% employed 6 to 9 men, and the remaining majority (69%). [0]
  • 85% of films had no women directors, 73% had no women writers, 44% had no women executive producers, 31% had no women producers, 72% had no women editors, and 95% had no women cinematographers. [0]
  • 94% of films had no female composers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 40% of music supervisors. [0]
  • 74% of films had no female music supervisors. [0]
  • 92% of films had no female supervising sound editors. [0]
  • Women comprised 4% of sound designers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 23% of production designers. [0]
  • 80% of films had no female production designers. [0]
  • Women comprised 31% of art directors. [0]
  • 71% of films had no female art directors. [0]
  • 98% of films had no female special effects supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 6% of visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • 89% of films had no female visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 23% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and cinematographers. [0]
  • 31% of films employed no or 1 woman in the roles considered. [0]
  • 47% of films employed 2 to 5 women. [0]
  • 17% of films employed 6 to 9 women, and 5% employed 10 or more women. [0]
  • In contrast, 1% of films employed no or 1 man. [0]
  • 8% of films employed 2 to 5 men. [0]
  • 28% employed 6 to 9 men, and the majority or 63% employed 10 or more men. [0]
  • By genre, the largest percentage of women, relative to men, worked on documentaries (27%), followed by comedies (25%), dramas (24%), animated features (23%). [0]
  • horror features (17%), and action films (14%). [0]
  • Women fared best as producers (29%), followed by editors (22%), executive producers (22%), writers (20%), directors (14%), and cinematographers (6%). [0]
  • 93% of films had no female composers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 43% of music supervisors. [0]
  • 76% of films had no female music supervisors. [0]
  • Women comprised 5% of sound designers. [0]
  • 97% of films had no femalesound designers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 10% of supervising sound editors. [0]
  • Women comprised 25% of production designers. [0]
  • 81% of films had no female production designers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 32% of art directors. [0]
  • 76% of films had no female art directors. [0]
  • Women comprised 3% of special effects supervisors. [0]
  • 99% of films had no female special effects supervisors. [0]
  • Women accounted for 6% of visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • 91% of films had no female visual effects supervisors. [0]
  • On films with at least one female director, women comprised 59% of writers. [0]
  • On films with exclusively male directors, women accounted for 13% of writers. [0]
  • On films with at least one female director, women comprised 43% of editors. [0]
  • On films with exclusively male directors, women accounted for 19% of editors. [0]
  • On films with at least one female director, women comprised 21% of cinematographers. [0]
  • On films with exclusively male directors, women accounted for 2% of cinematographers. [0]
  • On films with at least one female director, women comprised 16% of composers. [0]
  • On films with exclusively male directors, women accounted for 6% of composers. [0]
  • Women comprised 33% of directors, 32% of writers, 37% of producers, 32% of executive producers, 29% of editors, and 16% of cinematographers. [0]
  • Overall, women comprised 32% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and cinematographers. [0]
  • 83% of the films had no women cinematographers, 73% had no women writers, 69% had no women editors, 65% had no women directors, 62% had no women executive producers, and 32% had no women producers. [0]
  • Women accounted for 35% of those working in key behindthe scenes roles on documentaries versus 29% of those working on narrative features. [0]
  • On films with at least one female director, women comprised 72% of writers, 45% of editors, and 27% of cinematographers. [0]
  • On films directed exclusively by men, women represented 11% of writers, 21% of editors, and 10% of cinematographers. [0]
  • 32% of the films considered employed 0 or 1 woman, 45% employed 2 to 5 women, 17% employed 6 to 9 women, and 6% employed 10 or more women. [0]
  • 10% of the films employed 0 or 1 man, 26% employed 2 to 5 men, 34% employed 6 to 9 men, and 29% employed 10 or more men. [0]
  • Of the 130 directors examined, 76.9% were men and 23.1% were women. [0]
  • Netflix fictional films featured a substantially higher percentage of women directors than top grossing fictional films (2018=4.5%, 2019=10.7%). [0]
  • Only 25.2% of screenwriters were women, which did not meaningfully vary by year. [0]
  • Netflix films (25.2%) were more likely than top grossing movies (16.7%) to have women screenwriters overall and in 2018 (27.5% vs. 13.7%). [0]
  • Of the 431 producers evaluated, only 29% were women. [0]
  • Only 19% of producers were women across 200 top grossing films, with 21.5% in 2019 and 16.6% in 2018. [0]
  • /co leads (75.9% vs. 40.2%), main cast (49% vs. 37%) and speaking characters (45.9% vs. 33.7%). [0]
  • Only 16.9% of film directors were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • The proportion of underrepresented directors across the 2year Netflix sample did not differ meaningfully from top. [0]
  • Of film screenwriters, 16.4% were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • From 2018 (13.9%) to 2019 (19%). [0]
  • While no difference emerged in 2018, Netflix hired more underrepresented writers in 2019 (19%). [0]
  • Of the 431 Netflix film producers, 13% were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. [0]
  • Netflix (10.6%) featured significantly fewer producers of color than did top grossing films (19%). [0]
  • No difference was observed in 2018 (Netflix=14.7%, TG=11.3%). [0]
  • Films with one or more underrepresented directors attached were more likely than those without to feature underrepresented leads/co leads (86.4% vs. 25%), main cast (68.1% vs. 29.2%), and speaking characters (67.1% vs. 31.2%). [0]
  • Roughly two thirds of Netflix film directors were white men (66.2%). [0]
  • Netflix featured fewer underrepresented men as directors than top grossing movies (18.3%). [0]
  • Netflix did outperform top grossing films in the percentage of underrepresented women helmers in 2018 (5.6% vs. <1%). [0]
  • Of Netflix screenwriters, 62.2% were white men, 21.4% were white women, 12.4% were underrepresented men and 4% were underrepresented women. [0]
  • Turning to Netflix film producers, 63.6% were white men, 23.4% were white women, 7.4% were underrepresented men, and 5.6% were underrepresented women. [0]
  • Netflix (6.1%). [0]
  • All of the data points for women of color were in the single digits (4 6%). [0]
  • Of the top 100 films 20092019 Black girls and women are 6.5% of the US population, but only 3.7% of leads/co. [0]
  • 19.0% of Black leading ladies have a dark skin tone. [0]
  • Most Black leading ladies (57.1%). [0]
  • Black girls and women are 6.5% of the US population, 6.1% of all characters, and 5.7% of leading characters. [0]
  • Black female characters and other female characters of color are less likely to be portrayed as working in a service job than white female characters (7.5% and 11.8% compared to 15.2%). [0]
  • Black women are more likely to be depicted as working in a STEM occupation than other women of color and white women (14.3% compared to 9.6% and 9.6%, respectively). [0]
  • Black women are just as likely as white women to be shown as a leader (41.3% and 43.1%). [0]
  • Black female characters are far more likely to be shown as “smart” than white female characters or other female characters of color (54.1% compared to 44.2% and 42.6%, respectively). [0]
  • Black women (69.1%) are more likely than white women (52.3%) or other women of color (50.7%). [0]
  • Black women (13.5%) and other women of color (14.8%) are more likely to be depicted as partially/fully nude than white women (9.0%). [0]
  • Other women of color (56.9%) and white women (51.2%) are significantly more likely to be depicted as attractive than Black women (41.4%). [0]
  • Black female characters are more likely to be shown as violent than white female characters (29.3% compared to 24.6%) and twice as likely to be violent as other female characters of color (14.8%). [0]
  • White women (27.2%) are more likely to be depicted as being in a romantic relationship than Black women (22.7%) or other women of color (25.9%). [0]
  • White women (16.9%) are more likely to have at least one sexual partner in films compared with Black women (13.3%) and other women of color (14.8%). [0]
  • Only 2.5% of the 3,952 credited film producers were Asian or Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. [0]
  • 85.7% were men and only 14.3% were women. [0]
  • Only 3.3% of casting directors were API. [0]
  • 84.9% of the casters were API women and only 15.1% were API men. [0]
  • A similar but less pronounced pattern emerged with producers (API Producer=8.9%, No API producer=3%). [0]
  • Films with an API director (21.5%) or caster (14.3%) depicted more API cast than films without an API director (5.4%) or caster (5.4%). [0]
  • The prevalence of an API producer (yes=8.7%, no=5.8%). [0]
  • 6.4% of all executives were from the API community. [0]
  • Just under 6% were at the President or C suite level and 7 were Executive or Senior Vice Presidents. [0]
  • Just over half (61.5%). [0]
  • Hispanic/Latino directors represented 4.2% of all helmers. [0]
  • Overall, 3% of producers were Hispanic/Latino. [0]
  • The majority of Hispanic/Latino producers were men (78.1%, n=93) while less than one quarter (21.9%, n=26). [0]
  • Hispanic/Latina producers represented less than 1% (0.7%). [0]
  • Out of 2,014 casting directors, 3.3% were Hispanic/Latino. [0]
  • The majority of Hispanic/Latino casting directors were women 74.2% in total, compared to 25.8% who were men. [0]
  • Films with a Hispanic/Latino director were more likely to include Hispanic/Latino characters, as 13.9% of all characters were Hispanic/Latino across these films. [0]
  • Movies with a non Hispanic/Latino director had casts that included Hispanic/Latino characters in 4.7% of all speaking roles. [0]
  • Looking at 300 top grossing films from 20172019, nearly half of the films (47.1%). [0]
  • Films with a Hispanic/Latino casting director were more likely to feature Hispanic/Latino characters than those without Hispanic/Latino casting directors 10.6% vs. 4.8%. [0]
  • Less than half (41.7%). [0]
  • Slightly more than one third (34.2%). [0]
  • 36.8% of Hispanic/Latino producers were women. [0]
  • 5.9% of casting directors were Hispanic/Latino. [0]
  • In title cards, 84.8% of VFX credits were assigned to men, compared to 15.2% to women. [0]
  • In the main unit, 71.2% of credits were held by men versus 28.8% by women. [0]
  • Three quarters of credits in second units/locations went to men and 25% to women. [0]
  • Finally, 78.6% of post production VFX credits were assigned to men and 21.4% to women. [0]
  • Only 16.2% of leadership positions were filled by women. [0]
  • Less than one fifth of the women were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups (15.9%), which increased meaningfully from 2016 (13.8%) to 2019 (19%). [0]
  • Overall, 2.5% of all leadership roles were held by women of color. [0]
  • Of the 1,497 credits for VFX supervisor, only 2.9% were held by women. [0]
  • Of the 1,217 VFX producers, 46.7% were women. [0]
  • 23% of VFX editors were women. [0]
  • 76.9% were white and 23.1% were women of color. [0]
  • Of the 383 animation supervisor credits, only 14 or 3.7% were women. [0]
  • 765 individuals held the compositing supervisor post, 7.4% being women. [0]
  • Only 10 or 1.3% of compositing supervisors were women of color. [0]
  • 802 CG supervisors received credits; 3.5% were women; 19 of these women were white (2.4% of CG supervisors) and only 9 were women of color (1.1% of CG supervisors). [0]
  • With roles that lead to compositing supervisor, women were credited in 21.2% of compositing roles and 17% of art positions. [0]
  • Yet, only 7.4% of all compositing supervisors were women, and a mere 1.3% were women of color. [0]
  • With roles that lead to CG supervisor, women filled anywhere from 13.9% to 21.5% of credits across environment, lighting, layout, effects, animation, assets, and matchmove positions. [0]
  • As noted earlier, 3.7% of animation supervisors and 2% of lighting supervisors were women. [0]
  • This suggests that the initial drop off for women comes as they move into departmental supervision roles, as only 3.5% of CG supervisors were women, with 1.1% of these credits earned by women of color. [0]
  • Nearly two thirds (64.5%). [0]
  • Additionally, 60.9% of supervising producers, 57.1% of additional producers, 56.2% of associate producers, and 50.7% of line producers were women. [0]
  • 46.5% of VFX producer credits went to women, as did 39.9% of executive producer credits. [0]
  • 73.1% were men and 26.9% were women. [0]
  • Only 5.5% were women of color. [0]
  • Of the 80 executives at the highest position across companies 11.2% were women. [0]
  • Of the 60 companies, 35% did not include a woman in an executive role. [0]
  • This figure increased to 75% when women of color were considered. [0]
  • Women were most likely to work in the executive ranks at the top VFX companies evaluated 30% of the executives at the top 20 companies were women, compared to 24.8% at the middle tier and 21.4% in the lowest tier. [0]
  • Fewer than 10% of executives were women of color across all three tiers top tier (6.2%); middle tier (4.8%); lowest tier (4.8%). [0]
  • Most companies operate both in the U.S. and internationally, and 28.4% of executives in these organizations were women. [0]
  • This was significantly more than companies that only operated internationally (22.5%). [0]
  • Companies with both U.S. and international operations employed the highest percentage of women of color in executive roles (6.7%), though this was not significantly greater than U.S. only (4.4%) or International (2.7%). [0]
  • Of the 14 A category festivals that held an edition Just two of 223 films (0.9%). [0]
  • Only two of 233 directors (0.86%). [0]
  • 21.52% of main competition films at the major festivals were directed by women. [0]
  • 7.62% were from Arab directors, and 21.08% from Asian directors. [0]
  • 26.5% were women; 20.2% were BIPOC. [0]
  • 20.2 % were white women; 7.2% were BIPOC women; 13% were BIPOC men. [0]
  • The data also shows us that the USC acceptance rate for Writing for Screen and TV is 26% that the NYU acceptance rate is 19%. [5]
  • Columbia Acceptance Rate for Directing and Screenwriting is 26%. [5]
  • Maybe you’ve heard that their acceptance rate is 2% but what is it, really?. [5]
  • A first script sale is likely to be at “WGA minimum,” which is around $100,000. [6]
  • Take out 10% for an agent, maybe 15% for a manager, and maybe 5% for a lawyer, plus 1.5% for WGA dues. [6]
  • According to one source, screenwriters in the US earn an average of about $77,260 per year – when they have work. [6]
  • Approximately 89 people earned above $663,400 (top 5%). [6]
  • From the WGA in 2011 Most writers are middle class; 46% did not even work last year. [6]
  • Of those who do work, one quarter make less than $37,700 a year and 50% make less than $105,000 a year. [6]
  • The report, sent to members Friday, notes that “Even in the face of a global pandemic and its impact on our industry, underrepresented writers achieved a 3% overall increase in hiring, making up 43% of the more than 2,000 screenwriters hired in 2020.”. [7]
  • Actually, the percentage of increase is considerably higher because the 3% cited by the guild is three percentage points higher – not 3% higher. [7]
  • The report says that women and people of color both “achieved a 3% increase in representation among working screenwriters,” and that “people of color increased their share from 20% in 2019 to 23% in 2020.”. [7]
  • An increase of three percentage points – from 20% to 23% – is actually a 15% increase. [7]
  • “In the WGAW’s 2021 Screen Survey, 76% of BIPOC respondents reported experiencing discrimination, bullying, and/or harassment based on their race/color in their professional careers.”. [7]
  • A breakdown by ethnicity and gender reveals that women of color held just 10% of screenwriting jobs in 2020, which was up from 7% in 2019 – a 42.9% increase. [7]
  • “In contrast, the hiring of men of color showed no gains over 2019 – holding at just 13% of all screen jobs,” the report says. [7]
  • “White women had a slight uptick from 20% to 21%.”. [7]
  • writers saw small increases in their share of employment compared with 2019, but representation for Latinx, Black and AAPI screenwriters is at approximately half or less of their relative percentages of the U.S. population. [7]
  • Walt Disney Studios improved significantly from 2019, with a 7% increase in hiring of screenwriters of color in 2020, while Viacom/Paramount and Sony continue to rank lowest among these studios.”. [7]
  • Despite making up 29% of the U.S. population, only 18% of screenwriters employed in 2020 were over 55.”. [7]
  • In the WGAW’s 2021 Screen Survey, 84% of writers over 55 reported experiencing discrimination, bullying, and/or harassment due to their age.”. [7]
  • People with disabilities make up 26% of the U.S. population, but the report found that disabled screenwriters face a “profound” disparity in hiring. [7]
  • “Disabled writers were hired for only 0.5% of screenwriting jobs in 2020. [7]
  • “The best data available puts LGBTQ+ Americans at roughly 8% of the U.S. adult population,” the report says. [7]
  • “In 2020, LGBTQ+ writers were hired for 6% of screenwriting jobs. [7]
  • According to a recent survey of 158 members of the LGBTQ+ Writers Committee, 22% report having been the target of overt discrimination and/or harassment in an industry setting. [7]

I know you want to use Screenwriting Software, thus we made this list of best Screenwriting Software. We also wrote about how to learn Screenwriting Software and how to install Screenwriting Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Screenwriting Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Screenwriting statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. womenandhollywood – https://womenandhollywood.com/resources/statistics/2019-statistics/.
  2. scriptmag – https://scriptmag.com/features/what-are-your-real-chances-of-success.
  3. screencraft – https://screencraft.org/blog/7-ways-to-be-a-more-positive-screenwriter/.
  4. stephenfollows – https://stephenfollows.com/category/screenwriting/.
  5. helpscoutdocs – https://writerduet.helpscoutdocs.com/article/214-document-statistics.
  6. filmschool – https://www.filmschool.org/articles/film-school-mfa-acceptance-rates-minimum-gpas-decision-dates-and-more-2020-stats.20/.
  7. lauridonahue – https://lauridonahue.com/tell-me-the-odds-stps-2/.
  8. deadline – https://deadline.com/2021/11/screenwriting-inclusion-report-women-people-of-color-continue-progress-underrepresented-wga-west-1234869192/.

How Useful is Screenwriting

The importance of a strong screenplay cannot be overstated. It serves as the blueprint for a film, outlining the plot, characters, dialogue, and setting. A well-written screenplay can captivate audiences, evoke powerful emotions, and transport viewers to different worlds. It lays the foundation for the entire filmmaking process, guiding every creative decision from casting to editing.

Screenwriting is a blend of art and craft, requiring a unique set of skills. A good screenwriter must be able to craft engaging dialogue, create memorable characters, and structure a narrative that hooks the audience from the first page to the last. They must also be able to collaborate with directors, producers, and actors to bring their vision to life on the screen.

One of the key aspects of screenwriting is storytelling. A screenplay is essentially a story told through the lens of film, and the ability to tell a compelling story is essential to the success of any film. Whether it’s a drama, comedy, action movie, or romance, the story is the heart of the film, and it’s the screenwriter’s job to make sure that heart beats strong.

In addition to storytelling, screenwriting also requires a deep understanding of structure and pacing. A well-structured screenplay follows a clear arc, with a beginning, middle, and end that build to a satisfying climax. Pacing is crucial to keeping the audience engaged, with a good balance of action, dialogue, and character development to maintain momentum throughout the film.

Screenwriting is also a highly collaborative process. While the screenwriter is responsible for crafting the initial blueprint, that script will likely undergo numerous revisions as it is passed along to directors, producers, and actors. Each person involved in the filmmaking process brings their own unique perspective and expertise to the project, and it’s the screenwriter’s job to incorporate that feedback while staying true to the core vision of the film.

Ultimately, the goal of screenwriting is to create a story that resonates with audiences, that entertains, educates, and inspires. A well-written screenplay can have a profound impact on the world, influencing how we see ourselves and others, sparking important conversations, and challenging our beliefs.

In conclusion, screenwriting is an invaluable and indispensable part of the filmmaking process. It is a creative, collaborative, and transformative art form that has the power to entertain, enlighten, and inspire. So the next time you watch a movie, take a moment to appreciate the skill and dedication of the screenwriter behind the scenes, shaping the story that unfolds on the screen.

In Conclusion

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We tried our best to provide all the Screenwriting statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Screenwriting statistics.




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