Shipping Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
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Are you looking to add Shipping to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Shipping statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Shipping stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Shipping statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Shipping have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Shipping? We will answer all your Shipping related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Shipping Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 116 Shipping Statistics on this page 🙂

Shipping Benefits Statistics

  • Over 60 percent of that same group also noted the time saving benefits and home delivery of online shopping was a key factor in making purchasing decisions as well. [0]

Shipping Software Statistics

  • For the time being, consumers’ preferred notification types are split between three key notification types, according to package tracking software company Route17. [1]

Shipping Latest Statistics

  • During this time span, the volume of goods carried by ships rose by almost 35 percent, while the combined capacity of merchant ships grew by around 17 percent. [2]
  • Today, it is estimated that an overwhelming majority of goods, around 80 percent, are transported by ships. [2]
  • That said, in 2018 the volume of maritime trade grew by around 2.7 percent compared with the previous year and in 2019 the growth reached just 0.5 percent. [2]
  • In 2020, the volume should shrink by around four percent compared with 2019. [2]
  • Blank sailings increased by some 200 percent in February 2020compared with the previous month. [2]
  • Newsroom North American Transborder Freight up 17.3% in 2024. [3]
  • As indicated by the LSCI.c Change of less than 5 per cent compared to the value in the previous year. [4]
  • In 2020, ports in the developing economies of Asia and Oceania handled 509 million TEUs of containers, accounting for 62 per cent of world port container traffic. [4]
  • The shares of developing America and developing Africa were significantly lower, at 7 and 4 per cent, respectively. [4]
  • Developed economies accounted for 26 per cent. [4]
  • There were 49 large ships totally lost in 2020, basically unchanged from 48 in 2019, according to latest data from Allianz. [5]
  • Allianz noted the economic effect of COVID 19 was less than first expected as global sea trade volume fell by only 3.6 percent. [5]
  • The East Mediterranean and Black Sea region ranked second for shipping losses in 2020 with seven losses accounting for 14 percent of the year’s losses. [5]
  • Around 80% of the volume of international trade in goods is carried by sea, and the percentage is even higher for most developing countries. [6]
  • 73% of people reported that they were shopping online more in 2020 than they did in previous years. [0]
  • Of those respondents, 88% expect that they will continue to ship online at this new, higher rate. [0]
  • It’s estimated that before 2020, parcel delivery accounted for roughly 5% of the total volume handled by the postal service. [0]
  • 67% of survey respondents noted that they purchased clothing online, while 60% noted household items, 56% groceries, 51% cleaning supplies, and 49% electronics. [0]
  • It’s expected that ecommerce’s share of the pie will increase to 21.8% by 2024. [0]
  • This 20% drop off illustrates the importance and expectation that most consumers have when it comes to standard two. [0]
  • In fact, that same report found that early shoppers are expected to spend roughly 28% more than late shoppers. [0]
  • Furthermore, the report revealed 79% of consumers in Canada and 75% worldwide stated similar responses. [0]
  • Compare this statistic with over 75% of consumers desiring same day shipping and there is a significant gap. [0]
  • Far East to Sub Saharan Africa . [7]
  • +83 points Largest Monthly Regional Shift Far East Exports . [7]
  • The median wage is the 50th percentile wage estimate 50 percent of workers earn less than the median and 50 percent of workers earn more than the median. [8]
  • The total gross weight of goods transported as part of EU short sea shipping was estimated at almost 1.7 billion tonnes in 2020. [9]
  • Italy was the major short sea shipping country in the EU in 2020, with a share of more than 14 % of the total EU short sea shipping tonnage. [9]
  • EU short sea shipping decreased by 6.6 % in 2020 compared to 2019 Italy, the Netherlands and Spain accounted for almost 40 % of EU short sea shipping in 2020. [9]
  • The top 20 EU ports accounted for 38 % of EU short sea shipping. [9]
  • The total gross weight of goods transported as part of EU short sea shipping is estimated at almost 1.7 billion tonnes in 2020, a decrease of 6.6 % from the previous year. [9]
  • Short sea shipping made up 60.4 % of the total sea transport of goods to and from the main EU ports in 2020, 0.6 percentage points more as compared to 2019. [9]
  • In 2020, it was lower than 63 % in France, Portugal, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Slovenia. [9]
  • Italy was the major short sea shipping country in the EU in 2020, with 287 million tonnes, representing a share of 14.4 % of the total tonnages of EU short sea shipping in 2020. [9]
  • Malta (+27.0 %), Croatia (+23.0 %), Cyprus (+2.8 %) and Sweden (+0.4 %). [9]
  • In addition, the EFTA country Norway as well as the candidate country Turkey also recorded a positive trend between 2019 and 2020 (+3.1 % and +1.8 %, respectively). [9]
  • The largest relative decreases in short sea shipping among the EU Member States were recorded by Latvia (27.0 %), Bulgaria (17.2 %), Slovenia (16.7 %) and Spain . [9]
  • In 2020, inward movements accounted for almost 59 % of the total tonnes of goods handled in the EU ports that were involved in short sea shipping transport. [9]
  • Malta and Cyprus had the highest shares of unloaded goods in 2020, with respective shares of 94 % and 71 % of the total tonnes of short sea shipped goods recorded as inward movements to their ports. [9]
  • This amounted to 32 % of the total EU short sea shipping tonnages for all sea regions in 2020. [9]
  • The Mediterranean Sea was followed by the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, with respective shares of 23 % and 21 % of the total EU short shipping tonnages. [9]
  • There are some exceptions, like Bulgaria and Romania on the Black Sea, where 50 % and 52 % of the short sea shipping of goods came from or was destined to ports located on the Mediterranean coast, respectively. [9]
  • At 696 million tonnes, liquid bulk accounted for 41 % of the total short sea shipping of goods to and from main EU ports in 2020. [9]
  • Liquid bulk was followed by dry bulk at 349 million tonnes (21 %), containers at 285 million tonnes (17 %) and roll on roll off units at 233 million tonnes (14 %). [9]
  • While liquid bulk goods accounted for 59 % of total short sea shipping of goods in the Black Sea, the comparable figure for the Atlantic Ocean was only 30 % of the total. [9]
  • By contrast, the share of dry bulk goods in the short sea shipping of each sea region is more evenly distributed, with a range from 16 % in the Mediterranean Sea to 29 % in the Black Sea. [9]
  • Eurostat Goods transported in containers accounted for 23 % of the short sea cargo in the Mediterranean Sea in 2020, while it only made up 7 % of the short sea shipping in the Black Sea. [9]
  • Similarly, goods transported on RoRo units accounted for 22 % of the short sea shipping in the Atlantic Ocean, due to the location of the main Ro. [9]
  • By contrast, short sea shipping of goods on Ro Ro units barely registered in the Black Sea (less than 1 %). [9]
  • The top 20 ports accounted for 38 % of the total short sea shipped goods handled in the main EU ports in 2020. [9]
  • Among the top 20 EU ports, only three ports registered a growth in 2020 compared to 2019 Bremerhaven (+7.8 %), Zeebrugge (+6.4 %) and Marseille (+1.4 %). [9]
  • Amongst them, Amsterdam reported the highest drop, with. [9]
  • Also Le Havre, Genova and Gdańsk recorded falls of more than 10 % over the same period. [9]
  • In particular, 88 % of the goods handled in the port of Dublin were short sea shipped. [9]
  • At 106 million tonnes, Rotterdam handled 13 % of the total short sea shipped liquid bulk goods reported by the main EU ports in 2020, by far the largest volume of short sea shipped liquid bulk for any EU port. [9]
  • In 2020, the share of short sea shipped liquid bulk on the total sea transport of liquid bulk was particularly pronounced in the port of Sköldvik, with 94 %. [9]
  • At 21 million tonnes in 2020, Rotterdam overtook Amsterdam to become the EU’s largest port for short sea shipping of dry bulk goods after a decrease of 13.9 % for Amsterdam in 2020 compared to the previous year. [9]
  • In 2020, the share of short sea shipped dry bulk on the total sea transport of dry bulk was higher than 50 % in the ports of Constanta, Gent and Amsterdam. [9]
  • In 2020, the share of short sea shipped goods in containers on the total sea transport of goods in containers was below 50 % for all top 5 ports for containers handled, with the exception of Piraeus, with 59 %. [9]
  • In 2020, the top 5 ports for containers handled 39 % of the total short sea shipped container goods in main EU ports, in terms of gross weight of goods. [9]
  • Calais remained the largest port for short sea shipped goods on Ro Ro units with 16 million tonnes in 2020 despite a decrease of 9.8 % compared to the previous year. [9]
  • After an increase of 7.6 % compared to 2019, the port of Livorno reached the third position in 2020 with almost 14 million tonnes of Ro. [9]
  • In 2020, the goods on RoRo units were exclusively short sea shipped in Calais and Trelleborg, while, in Livorno and Zeebrugge, short sea shipping of goods on RoRo units represented 96 % and 94 % of the total sea transport of goods on Ro. [9]
  • For Dublin, other seaborne transport (0.2 %). [9]
  • Indeed, in terms of number of twenty foot equivalent units , short sea shipping of containers in the main EU ports decreased by 0.6 % from 2019 to 2020, to 32.7 million ). [9]
  • While empty containers decreased by 3.7 %, to 7 million TEUs, in 2020 compared to the previous year, transport of loaded containers slightly increased by 0.3 %. [9]
  • shipped goods in containers in the EU, with 6.8 million TEUs, showing a large increase of 10.2 % compared to the previous year. [9]
  • The most noticeable decrease was observed for Estonia (10.5 %), followed by Lithuania (9.4 %) and Finland . [9]
  • By contrast, besides Italy, Denmark and Belgium recorded substantial growths in short sea shipping of containers compared with 2019 (+9.2 % and +7.5 %, respectively). [9]
  • At EU level, the loaded containers represented more than 78 % of all containers short sea shipped in 2020. [9]
  • Italy had the highest share of loaded containers (95 %) while Cyprus had the lowest (63 %). [9]
  • It should be noted that the share of unknown partner ports in the total seaborne transport varies between 1 % and 4 % at EU level over the period 2006. [9]
  • The share of unknown partner ports in the total seaborne transport of containers varies between 3 % and 5 % at EU level over the period 2006. [9]
  • The share was 7 % in 2012 and 2016, 8 % in periods 20132015 and 2017. [9]
  • In 2020, the share was 9 %. [9]
  • It should be noted that the share of unknown partner ports in the total seaborne transport is less than 5 % in 2010, 2019 and 2020 for all the mentioned ports, with the exception of Constanta in 2010 (7 %). [9]
  • When looking at each type of cargo, this share is lower than 6 % for all ports, except Rotterdam for containers (9 % in 2019 and 8 % in 2020). [9]
  • Greece For container statistics, the data reported by Greece contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown ports in 2010 (7 %). [9]
  • Spain For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 8 % in 2010, 7 % in 2019 and 6 % in 2020. [9]
  • The quarterly data for port activity in France have been partially estimated by Eurostat for the period 2009. [9]
  • For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 5 % in 2010, 10 % in 2019and 7 % in 2020. [9]
  • Cyprus The data reported by Cyprus contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports in 2010 (58 %). [9]
  • In 2019 and 2020, the share was below 3 %. [9]
  • This has several consequences the volume of SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated in 2010; change rates of SSS may not be reliable. [9]
  • The same is similarly applicable to container statistics, where the share of unknown partner ports is 64 % in 2010.This share was less than 1 % in 2019 and 2020. [9]
  • For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was significant in 2019 (42 %) and in 2020 (52 %). [9]
  • Romania The data reported by Romania contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports 6 % in 2010. [9]
  • This has several consequences the volume of SSS and its share in total seaborne transport are probably underestimated in 2010; growth rates of SSS between consecutive years may not be reliable. [9]
  • The same is more specifically applicable to container statistics, where the share of unknown partner ports is 50 % in 2010. [9]
  • The data reported by Sweden contain a significant share of declarations to and from unknown partner ports 5 % in 2019, while it was 3 % in 2020. [9]
  • For container statistics, the share of unknown partner ports was 7 % in 2019 and 5 % in 2020, while it was less than 1 % in 2010. [9]
  • Overall employment of delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. [10]
  • 73% of consumers report they are shopping online more now than they did prior to the pandemic and 88% of people say they will continue to shop online even after a cure or vaccine is discovered1. [1]
  • According to GroupM, global retail eCommerce sales will rise to $7 trillion by 2024 (comprising 25% of all retail sales). [1]
  • In December 2020, Parcel Pending by Quadient processed nearly 4 million packages through our locker systems – a 46% increase compared to 20193. [1]
  • The Washington Post reported that, in the U.S., packages typically account for 5% of postal service delivery volume; during the COVID 19 pandemic, parcel delivery volume surged 70%4. [1]
  • Driven by online shopping, Royal Mail delivered 496 million parcels in the U.K. during the last 3 months of 2020 – a 30% increase in parcel delivery volume over the same period in 20196. [1]
  • 68% of U.S. shoppers surveyed by Digital Commerce 360 indicated they didn’t make a purchase at least half of the time when a retailer didn’t offer free home delivery8. [1]
  • Invesp reports that most consumers expect a liberal return policy and 79% of them expect free return shipping9. [1]
  • Out of those surveyed 46% ranked reliability among the top attributes influencing their likelihood of remaining loyal to a brand. [1]
  • 41% ranked fast/reliable delivery as one of their top considerations when shopping online. [1]
  • 31% ranked a good returns policy among their top considerations when shopping online. [1]
  • 56% of shoppers aged 1834 expect same. [1]
  • 61% of all respondents are willing to pay extra for same. [1]
  • According to Convey, 81% of retailers are planning to boost spending on more complex last mile logistics initiatives 12. [1]
  • And a majority of retailers (57%). [1]
  • The main reason for this was to meet consumer demand for increased delivery speed (70%). [1]
  • followed by balancing delivery costs with consumer expectations (49%) and offering innovative delivery solutions to remain competitive (35%). [1]
  • A forwardthinking courier company will try to get their on time delivery percentage closer to 90 or 100% to retain their B2C customers. [1]
  • 72% of those surveyed say COVID accelerated their company’s digital transformation by at least a year. [1]
  • 73% say the pandemic accelerated their company’s technology. [1]
  • while 90% of text messages are read within 3 minutes of receipt, they’re difficult to search and lose effectiveness if not sent at the right time. [1]
  • Customers returned an estimated $428 billion in products in 2020. [1]
  • The bulk of customer returns were online purchases (with a whopping 30% return rate). [1]

I know you want to use Shipping Software, thus we made this list of best Shipping Software. We also wrote about how to learn Shipping Software and how to install Shipping Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Shipping Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Shipping statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. conveyco – https://www.conveyco.com/delivery-statistics/.
  2. parcelpending – https://www.parcelpending.com/blog/package-delivery-statistics/.
  3. statista – https://www.statista.com/topics/1728/ocean-shipping/.
  4. bts – https://www.bts.gov/.
  5. unctad – https://hbs.unctad.org/maritime-transport-indicators/.
  6. iii – https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-marine-accidents.
  7. unctad – https://unctad.org/topic/transport-and-trade-logistics/review-of-maritime-transport.
  8. containerstatistics – https://www.containerstatistics.com/.
  9. bls – https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes435071.htm.
  10. europa – https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Maritime_transport_statistics_-_short_sea_shipping_of_goods.
  11. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/delivery-truck-drivers-and-driver-sales-workers.htm.

How Useful is Shipping

One undeniable aspect of shipping is its capability to bridge geographical gaps. Landlocked countries have traditionally relied on shipping as a lifeline for importing and exporting a vast array of goods. It allows nations to access resources they are deprived of geographically, opens opportunities for international commerce, and reduces dependency on domestic production alone. This has led to an era of increased global specialization and interdependence, enabling countries to benefit from each other’s strengths. The diversity and availability of goods we enjoy today are a testament to the remarkable usefulness of shipping.

Moreover, shipping has proven to be an indispensable mode of transportation for essential resources such as food, medical supplies, and energy. Frozen food products are transported across the globe, ensuring a steady supply of nourishment for people in regions where local production may be limited. Medical equipment is rapidly transported to the corners of the earth, helping build a more responsive healthcare system. The transportation of oil and natural gas through vast tanker fleets is a central pillar supporting the global energy infrastructure. Without shipping, such crucial resources would not reach their intended recipients efficiently, posing severe risks to communities worldwide.

Furthermore, shipping has consistently facilitated cultural exchange and broadened our horizons. Through long voyages, both ancient and modern mariners have enabled the cross-pollination of ideas, religions, traditions, and customs. It has encouraged the exploration and discovery of new lands, establishing vital connections between societies and fostering mutual understanding. The amalgamation of diverse perspectives and cultural elements it engenders enriches our collective identities and stimulates creativity, institutionally embodying the concept of unity in diversity.

However, beyond these evident benefits, we must also recognize some challenges posed by shipping. The rapid globalization of trade has exacerbated concerns about the environmental impact of shipping activities. Ships rely heavily on fossil fuels, contributing to significant carbon emissions, air pollution, and a host of ecological problems. The improper disposal of waste, ballast water, and other pollutants may cause severe harm to marine life and damage sensitive ecosystems. Sustainable shipping practices and innovative solutions should be prioritized to mitigate these environmental hazards and safeguard the ocean’s fragile vitality.

Furthermore, despite its effectiveness in connecting nations, shipping has also witnessed instances of exploitation, modern-day piracy, and other nefarious activities. Ships have been exploited as conduits for human trafficking, smuggling, and the illicit transportation of drugs or arms. Swift action, collaboration between countries, and stringent maritime security protocols are imperative to address this dark realm and ensure safety on the high seas.

In conclusion, shipping has undeniably revolutionized our world, providing invaluable services in terms of global trade, relieving resource imbalances, and encouraging cultural intermingling. However, its usefulness must be evaluated within a broader perspective that encompasses its impact on the environment and its vulnerabilities to illegal activities. By recognizing these associated challenges and devising sustainable solutions, humanity can refine its indispensable relationship with shipping, maximizing its benefits while minimizing disadvantages to create a more balanced and efficient mode of transportation for the future.

In Conclusion

Be it Shipping benefits statistics, Shipping usage statistics, Shipping productivity statistics, Shipping adoption statistics, Shipping roi statistics, Shipping market statistics, statistics on use of Shipping, Shipping analytics statistics, statistics of companies that use Shipping, statistics small businesses using Shipping, top Shipping systems usa statistics, Shipping software market statistics, statistics dissatisfied with Shipping, statistics of businesses using Shipping, Shipping key statistics, Shipping systems statistics, nonprofit Shipping statistics, Shipping failure statistics, top Shipping statistics, best Shipping statistics, Shipping statistics small business, Shipping statistics 2024, Shipping statistics 2021, Shipping statistics 2024 you will find all from this page. 🙂

We tried our best to provide all the Shipping statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Shipping statistics.

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