Skills Management Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
Last updated: 
WebinarCare offers informative content for educational purposes only, not as a substitute for professional legal or tax advice. We may earn commissions if you use the services we recommend on this site.
WebinarCare is led by Steve Bennett, a seasoned expert in the business world. He's gathered a team that's passionate about giving you reliable advice on everything from starting a business to picking the right tools. We base our tips and guides on real-life experience, ensuring you get straightforward and proven advice. Our goal is to make your business journey smoother and more successful. When you choose WebinarCare, you're choosing a trustworthy guide for all things business.

Are you looking to add Skills Management to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Skills Management statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Skills Management stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Skills Management statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Skills Management have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Skills Management? We will answer all your Skills Management related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Skills Management Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 484 Skills Management Statistics on this page 🙂

Skills Management Benefits Statistics

  • This brings the benefits of collaborative tools full circle — the University of Oxford reports that happy employees are 13% more productive. [0]
  • However, 133% of non software projects fail to meet their stated benefits, compared to just 17% for software projects. [1]

Skills Management Market Statistics

  • The PM software market is poised to register a CAGR of 10.17% between 2020 and 2025. [2]
  • The growing trend of the PMS market will continue to grow, reaching 10.17% CAGR between 2020 and 2025. [2]
  • With a 22.74% market share, this project management software product is the absolute industry leader. [2]

Skills Management Software Statistics

  • A Wrike survey has found that 85% of collaborative software users consider themselves to be happy employees. [0]
  • As per Wellingtone’s survey, only 22% of organizations use a PM software. [1]
  • As a result, 50% of respondents said that they spend one or more days to manually collate project reports highlighting the immense productivity gains on offer by using project management software. [1]
  • 77% of high performing projects use project management software. [1]
  • Despite its impact, adoption rates for PM software remains low . [1]
  • 66% of project managers say that they would use PM software more extensively if they had adequate support from their organization. [1]
  • A majority 54% use on premise PM software, though this is quickly changing. [1]
  • The same study also found that 44% of project managers use no software, even though using any popular commercially available PM software has been known to improve performance and project satisfaction. [1]
  • 66% of respondents in Capterra’s survey also said that they used project management software to communicate with clients. [1]
  • While software projects have an average cost overrun of 66%, the same figure for non software projects is 43%. [1]
  • However, 133% of non software projects fail to meet their stated benefits, compared to just 17% for software projects. [1]
  • Overall, 76% of users say they are either “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with their decision to use project management software. [1]
  • 79% use PM software tool training, 76% offer training on PM basics, 67% offer advanced PM skills development, and 61% offer leadership training. [1]
  • According to the U.S. software company Aha!, San Francisco product managers earn a median salary of $129,000. [3]
  • 88% report wanting to improve their time management and organizational skills — after all, only 21.7% said they use database software for organizing their assignments, while another 23% just memorize the to do list in their head. [4]
  • Only 22% of organizations use PM software. [2]
  • Project management facts show that the adoption of PM software remains low despite the fact that 77% of high performing projects use it. [2]
  • The PM software market is poised to register a CAGR of 10.17% between 2020 and 2025. [2]
  • With a 22.74% market share, this project management software product is the absolute industry leader. [2]
  • Workplace communication statistics show that 86% of employees and executives cite the lack of effective collaboration and communication as the main causes for workplace failures. [0]
  • Another research by Salesforce that included not only employees, but corporate executives and educators as well, shows that 86% of them believe ineffective communication is the underlying reason for workplace failures. [0]
  • The top five causes of project failure are Change in the organization’s priorities (39%). [1]
  • For such large IT projects, functionality issues and schedule overruns are the top two causes of failure (at 22% and 28% respectively). [1]
  • 55% of project managers cite budget overrun as a reason for project failure. [2]
  • The implementation of a management process, however, is shown to reduce the failure rate to 20% or below. [2]
  • A lack of clear goals is the most common factor (37%). [2]
  • IT project failure statistics show that 75% of respondents think their projects are always or usually doomed to fail from the start. [2]
  • 55% of project managers cite budget overruns as a reason for project failure. [2]
  • Construction project failure statistics show that over 50% of construction project owners worldwide (and 61% in the US). [2]
  • 41% of underperformers say inadequate sponsor support is the main reason for project failure. [2]
  • 41% of underperformers and 17% of high performers report inadequate sponsor support as the main reason for failure, according to project management failure statistics. [2]

Skills Management Adoption Statistics

  • Despite its impact, adoption rates for PM software remains low . [1]
  • The adoption rates have skyrocketed since the unfortunate events with the global pandemic and most of the world had to adapt to remote work — 7.6% or 332 million people more than in April 2020. [4]
  • Project management facts show that the adoption of PM software remains low despite the fact that 77% of high performing projects use it. [2]

Skills Management Latest Statistics

  • Nearly 30% of employees believe their manager lacks team. [5]
  • 17.9% of employees said their manager lacks feedback skills. [5]
  • 10.65% of employees said their manager lacks delegation skills. [5]
  • 14.6% of employees said their manager lacks time management skills. [5]
  • 13.7% of employees meet with their manager daily. [5]
  • 37.9% of employees meet with their manager weekly. [5]
  • 20.4% of employees meet with their manager monthly. [5]
  • 4.8% of employees meet with their manager annually 3.85% of employeesnevermeet with their manager. [5]
  • More than 20% of employees meet with their manager less frequently than once a month. [5]
  • 28.3% of employees are older than their managers. [5]
  • 49.3% of employees are younger than their managers. [5]
  • 21.2% of employees are the same age as their managers. [5]
  • 60% of people believe they have a “good” or “world. [5]
  • 5.9% believe their manager is “terrible.”. [5]
  • 14.8% believe their manager is “notso. [5]
  • 19.4% believe their manager is “average.”. [5]
  • Here’s what we discovered 80% of employees feel they can approach their boss with problems; 11% believe the opposite. [5]
  • 67% of employees feel they can make a mistake at work without their manager holding it against them; 15% disagree with this sentiment. [5]
  • 75% of employees feel they can easily approach their manager to ask for help; another 15% don’t feel this way. [5]
  • 59% of employees feel their manager would never act in a way to undermine their efforts; 24% believe their manager would. [5]
  • 70% of employees feel their manager values their unique skills; another 15% don’t think their skills are valued by their manager. [5]
  • 74% of employees feel their manager respects them; 6.5% don’t feel respected by their manager. [5]
  • 68% of employees feel their manager respects their values, even if they disagree; 11% feel otherwise. [5]
  • 43% of employees don’t believe their manager plays favorites; a staggering 33.4% said they think their manager plays favorites. [5]
  • The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. [6]
  • The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent. [6]
  • The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030. [6]
  • ## From airports [3 x 7] ## Filter code %in% c. [7]
  • These might include the average, the maximum, the median, the 90th percentile, or the fraction that are late. [7]
  • A possible rule might be to declare an airline is better than another if that airline has half an hour less average delay, and that same airline has 10% fewer delayed flights than the other. [7]
  • %>% filter## Source local data frame. [7]
  • On a global level, we have grown to nearly 120,000 members worldwide, 80% of whom are vested in the CMA® program either as active CMAs or as candidates. [8]
  • The other ones include Management Statistics What Employees Want Key Takeaways – Time Management Statistics – Less than 1 in 5 people (18%). [9]
  • – 82% of people don’t have a time management system. [9]
  • – 100% of people using this technique feel their work is under control either 4 or 5 days per week. [9]
  • – 28% of people using this technique feel their work is never or very rarely under control. [9]
  • – 1 in 8 people (12.5%). [9]
  • – Only 20%. [9]
  • – 49% of people have never carried out a time audit. [9]
  • 1 18% OF PEOPLE HAVE A DEDICATED TIME MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. [9]
  • 82% OF PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE A DEDICATED TIME MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. [9]
  • 2 33% OF PEOPLE USE A TO DO LIST TO MANAGE THEIR TIME AND TASKS. [9]
  • 24% OF PEOPLE USE THEIR EMAIL INBOX. [9]
  • 12% OF PEOPLE SCHEDULE ALL OF THEIR TASKS IN THEIR DIARY IN ADVANCE. [9]
  • 25% OF PEOPLE “JUST DEAL WITH WHATEVER. [9]
  • 20% OF PEOPLE FEEL THAT THEIR WORK IS UNDER CONTROL EVERY DAY 2. [9]
  • 66% OF PEOPLE FEEL THAT THEIR WORK IS UNDER CONTROL MOST OF THE TIME . [9]
  • OVER 20% (21%). [9]
  • MORE THAN 1 IN 4 (28%). [9]
  • 50% OF PEOPLE WITH THIS ANSWER FEEL THEIR WORK IS UNDER CONTROL EVERY DAY. [9]
  • 50% OF PEOPLE WITH THIS ANSWER FEEL THAT THEIR WORK IS UNDER CONTROL 4 DAYS OF THE WEEK. [9]
  • 60% OF PEOPLE USING THIS TECHNIQUE. [9]
  • 2 ALMOST 1 IN 3 (31%). [9]
  • 3 ALMOST HALF (49%). [9]
  • The average full time worker spends up to 12.5% of their average workday on low impact activities and unnecessary meetings where no meaningful communication takes place. [9]
  • Saving only one hour per week on average amounts to a 2.5% increase in your productive time. [9]
  • IN 6 PEOPLE ( 16.6 %). [9]
  • 19% OF PEOPLE LOOK AT THEIR EMAILS. [9]
  • ALMOST 20% (19.4%). [9]
  • It was evenly split between males (46%) and females (54%). [9]
  • The research was evenly split between age groups, with 20% of the replies being received from people in each of the following age categories. [9]
  • On the other hand, teams who communicate effectively may increase their productivity by as much as 25%. [0]
  • According to a McKinsey report, wellconnected teams see a productivity increase of 20. [0]
  • This increase affects task work — CMSWire reports that 97% of employees believe communication impacts their task efficacy on a daily basis. [0]
  • Moreover, a report by Think Talent shows that employees working in organizations with effective communication plans — ones that manage to minimize the silo effect and centralize communication — are 3.5 times more likely to outperform their peers. [0]
  • As showcased by Lexicon, a high percentage of more than 80% of Americans believe employee communication is crucial for developing trust with employers. [0]
  • According to her, miscommunication can cost a company of 100 employees $420,000 per year. [0]
  • According to David Grossman’s report, “The cost of poor communications” which included 400 large companies and 100,00 employees, the cost of communication barriers that arise in the workplace stands at $62.4 million per year, per company. [0]
  • According to research, 28% of employees point at poor communication as the reason for breached deadlines. [0]
  • One survey reported by the Harvard Business School shows 89% of employees serve on at least one global team. [0]
  • Moreover, 62% have colleagues from three or more cultures. [0]
  • According to Alexika, here are the 10 business languages of the world, based on the percentage of world Gross Domestic Product , and Gross Domestic Product in $US billions. [0]
  • You’ll also find the number of people who speak these languages worldwide, according to Ethnologue Language GDP in $US Billions % of world GDP Number of worldwide speakers 1. [0]
  • Official statistics show 78.1% of the US population speak English as their mother tongue. [0]
  • Spanish with a share of over 72.06%; French with a share of 14.08%; German with a share of 4.43%; Latin with a share of 2.30%; Japanese with a share of 0.82%. [0]
  • Spanish with a share of 50.2%; French with a share of 12.4%; American Sign Language 7.4%; German 5.7%; Japanese with a share of 4.9%. [0]
  • Official statistics show 98% of the UK population speak English as their mother tongue. [0]
  • When it comes to the languages spoken by the UK population aged 18 34 — the population of people likely to be engaged in work with a multicultural team — the top 5 include French; German; Spanish; Italian; Hindi. [0]
  • However, the listed languages are each spoken only by less than 20% of the UK population. [0]
  • According to a Statista report about finding reliable Covid 19 sources, 74% of people worldwide were worried there was a lot of false information circulating about the virus. [0]
  • Moreover, 45% found it difficult to find reliable and trustworthy information about the virus and its effects. [0]
  • Perceptyx reports that when employees were extremely content with communications about the company’s response to coronavirus, a whopping 96% of them trusted their employers put employee safety first. [0]
  • However, when such communication was poor, only 30% believed this. [0]
  • According to a Buffer’s State of Remote Work report from 2018. [0]
  • Back then, 21% of respondents highlighted remote collaborating and/or communicating as a crucial remote work challenge. [0]
  • A Statista report on the biggest struggles with working remotely, shows that 16% of people had difficulties with collaboration and communication in 2021. [0]
  • , when 20% of people had the same difficulties. [0]
  • In concrete numbers, this amounts to 65% of employees who’ve had communication training, compared to 52% of those who didn’t. [0]
  • According to a Gartner snap poll focused on making remote work successful during the pandemic, 54% of HR leaders cite poor technology and/or remote work infrastructure as the primary barrier to effective remote work. [0]
  • Forbes reports that the biggest such obstacle for 35% of people was weak Internet. [0]
  • Despite the occasional Internet issues, the previously mentioned Workplace Insight study has found that 85% of employers believe their employees have the technology, tools, and resources they need for productive remote work during an extended period. [0]
  • Out of 2,000 respondents, about 1,100 (55%). [0]
  • In numbers, home based employees tend to procrastinate 10 minutes less; work 1.4 days per month more; be 47% more productive. [0]
  • Namely, Workplace Insight has found only 15% of companies from Great Britain and Western Europe say working from home has had a clear negative effect on employee productivity. [0]
  • This study found that 73% of respondents believed they were more efficient when working from home;. [0]
  • For better or for worse, 68% believed they workedmore hourswhile working from home. [0]
  • According to a Gallup report about “How Coronavirus Will Change the ‘Next Normal’ Workplace”, the US alone saw a jump from 31% to 62% of people working remotely. [0]
  • One Stanford research by Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom shows 42% of the US workforce was working remotely in 2020. [0]
  • Statista research detailing the attitudes on remote work from employees in companies with digital output shows that 86% of them view remote work as the “future of work”. [0]
  • Moreover, a whopping 90% would recommend a remote work arrangement to a friend. [0]
  • remote work possibilities.87% of employees declared they are “satisfied with tools and processes that enable remote team communication”. [0]
  • This likely prompted 84% of employees to declare they can accomplish all of their tasks remotely. [0]
  • 86% of employees declared their leadership teams provide “agency and autonomy while working remotely”. [0]
  • Moreover, 84% of employees declared their leadership “understands what it takes to operate remotely”. [0]
  • A Gallup report even shows that as many as 54% of US workers would now leave their current job positions to pursue positions in companies that allow working from home. [0]
  • Moreover, Global Workplace Analytics shows that over 33% of employees would take a pay cut for the option to work from home. [0]
  • 2,058 US adults found that 69% of managers simply feel uncomfortable when communicating with employees faceto. [0]
  • This percentage is partly because 37% of the said managers feel uncomfortable giving direct feedback in business communication situations. [0]
  • Perhaps as a result of this reluctance to provide feedback, a small percentage of only 18% of employees have their communication skills evaluated within their performance reviews. [0]
  • Moreover, one Gallup estimate shows that only 50% of employees know what their managers expect from them. [0]
  • The Harvard Business Review cites that 72% of employees feel their performance would improve if their managers were to provide corrective — sometimes also dubbed as “negative” — feedback. [0]
  • Interestingly, employees actually prefer corrective feedback to praise or recognition by a 14% difference — with a 57% to 43% ratio. [0]
  • Moreover, If the corrective feedback is delivered appropriately, the original 72% rise to a whopping 92% of respondents who believe negative feedback is an effective way to improve one’s performance. [0]
  • A study by Officevibe shows that 43% of highly engaged individuals receive feedback at least once per week, in contrast with only 18% of low. [0]
  • In line with that, a report by Gallup shows engaged employees are 27% more likely to show an excellent work performance. [0]
  • A report by Trade Press Services shows that as many as 85% of employees claim they are most motivated when regularly updated about company news and information. [0]
  • And, according to Gatehouse, as many as 64% of businesses cite their business strategies, values, and purpose as crucial information they want to communicate. [0]
  • Namely, CEB/Gartner reports that more informed employees tend to outperform their less informed peers by a whopping 77%. [0]
  • Sadly, the same Trade Press Services report also shows that as many as 74% of employees believe they are missing out on important news and information in their companies. [0]
  • Moreover, IBM indicates 72% of employees don’t fully understand their companies’ business strategies. [0]
  • GoVitru reports that only 5.9% of organizations communicate goals on a daily basis — even though clear business goals are a crucial component in directing employee’s everyday efforts. [0]
  • Furthermore, only a share of 23% of executives claims their companies are efficient at aligning employees’ goals with corporate purposes. [0]
  • As a result, a majority of employees simply lack direction in work — or, a share of 57%, to be exact. [0]
  • Namely, one Workforce report shows that 60% of companies lack a long term strategy or vision for their internal communication processes. [0]
  • Namely, one VMA Group Study shows that 46% of its respondents say their communication progress is NOT researched or measured with Key Performance Indicators and other relevant metrics. [0]
  • Moreover, Gatehouse reports that 21% of worldwide businesses admit they do NOT have a formal plan for internal communication — this percentage rises to 31% in the US. [0]
  • The effects of great communication skills are undeniable — 73% of employers want employees with strong written communication skills, as found by the National Association of Colleges and Employees. [0]
  • The Association of American Colleges and Universities cites additional communication skills employers look for in prospective hires — as many as 93% of employers expect a demonstrated capacity to Think critically; Communicate clearly; Solve complex problems. [0]
  • Namely, one GMAC Corporate Recruiters survey shows that 69% of recruiters feel confident about hiring business school graduates who have the right communication skills, despite their lack of experience. [0]
  • Companies whose leaders possess effective communication skills have a 47% higher return to shareholders during a five. [0]
  • Namely, people who feel heard by co workers and superiors report feeling 4.6 times more likely to feel empowered to perform their best work. [0]
  • However, studies show that people spend 75% of the time while listening to others distracted, preoccupied, or forgetful. [0]
  • Luckily, research at the University of Minnesota shows that students who take listening training improve their ability to understand what is said by 40%. [0]
  • One Queens University of Charlotte infographic shows that 75% of employers view collaboration and teamwork as important aspects of a successful business. [0]
  • This percentage is well justified — the Institute for Corporate Productivity and Babson’s College Professor Rob Cross surveyed 1,100 American companies to find that companies who promote collaborative work are 5 times more likely to report a high performance. [0]
  • However, 39% of employees around the world believe that people in their organizations simply don’t collaborate enough. [0]
  • One McKinsey report indicates that 80% of businesses use social collaboration tools to enhance their business processes. [0]
  • Remotely reports that using online collaboration tools, but also participating in digital workplaces, helps increase productivity by 20. [0]
  • But, their preference for online communication at home (with a share of 65%). [0]
  • Ateam communication app, in 55% of the cases; email, in 28% of the cases. [0]
  • Emails are also a favorite communication channel — as many as 93% of Baby Boomers use email on an everyday basis. [0]
  • CMSWire reports that 85% of employees use more than one communication device to communicate at work — as many as 32% use three or more devices because they value flexibility. [0]
  • Computers— in 44% of the cases; Smartphones— in 36% of the cases; Tablets— in 16% of the cases; Desktop phones— in 5% of the cases. [0]
  • If they’re receiving voicemails, 82% claim they prefer the voicemails to come as text messages — because text is easier to scan for the right information. [0]
  • Instead, they rely on Emails— in 48% of the cases; Mobile phones— in 20% of the cases; Desk phones— in 10% of the cases; Text messaging— in 8% of the cases; Online meetings— in 8% of the cases. [0]
  • Globally speaking, these averages differ only slightly, according to a world encompassing Statista report North America— 3.1 communication tools; Asia Pacific— 3.42 communication tools; Europe, Middle East, and Africa— 3.56 communication tools. [0]
  • 44% of employees want to use their business communication tools more. [0]
  • The previously mentioned Interact survey shows that 16% of managers prefer email interactions because they feel uncomfortable communicating faceto. [0]
  • report by Project shows that 39% of businesses primarily use email for employee communication. [0]
  • Emails are also reported to be the primary method of communication for as many as 74% of adults. [0]
  • For example, only 34.1% of emails in North America actually get opened, which implies the abundance of email comes with a lower interest to interact. [0]
  • This disinterest may also be justified by the lack of emails’ true relevance — as many as 62% of emails in an average inbox are deemed unimportant. [0]
  • Furthermore, the emails that do get opened — 70% of emails we chose to open will get opened within 6 seconds upon receipt — still represent a productivity killer. [0]
  • According to Clockify’s report on the time spent on emails as a recurring task, we spend 2.5 hours per day communicating via email. [0]
  • Namely, Project’s report shows that 63% of people have missed an important piece of information because it went to a colleague’s inbox while the said colleague was absent. [0]
  • Almost half of the employees (47%). [0]
  • According to Project, online tools take second place when it comes to workplace communication devices — with a share of 28%. [0]
  • A Work Institute report on retention shows that effective communication systems help retain top talents in companies by 450%. [0]
  • A detailed Pew Research Center study shows that 81% of adults working from home at least part time say they use video calling or online conferencing services to stay in touch with their teams. [0]
  • 59% report using these services and tools often. [0]
  • Income is the second influential factor — video calling/online conferencing services are used by 69% of upperincome workers; 56% of middleincome workers; 41% of lower. [0]
  • An individual’s role in an organization is the third factor — 70% of supervisors use these tools, compared to 55% of people who are not supervisors. [0]
  • Apart from video calling/online conferencing services, 57% of people also like to use instant messaging platforms. [0]
  • 43% report using these business communication platforms often. [0]
  • These platforms are used by 49% of those younger than 50; 30% of those 50 and older. [0]
  • Namely, in companies that use Intranets as online communication solutions, only 13% report using them daily. [0]
  • According to a survey by Prescient Digital Media, 31% of employees surveyed admit they never use their companies’ Intranets. [0]
  • According to Project, people spend 23% of their time engaged in business communication on in. [0]
  • According to the Otter blog, there are 11 million meetings held each day, and employees spend 4 hours in meetings or preparing for meetings. [0]
  • Project’s report shows that 61% of people believe they waste time at meetings. [0]
  • This assumption seems to be justified — as many as 71% of senior managers believe meetings to be unproductive and inefficient. [0]
  • Namely, about 70% of Millennials claim going to the office is not necessary for effective work. [0]
  • According to Project, phone calls are still present as a form of workplace communication — albeit, with a share of only 2%. [0]
  • After all, as many as 75% of millennials — who currently represent the most prevalent generation in the US labor force — dislike making phone calls as they consider them “time. [0]
  • According to ZDNet research, an average phone conversation lasts 3 minutes and 15 seconds. [0]
  • 73% of Employers Want Candidates With This Skill. [0]
  • .Happy Workers are 13% More Productive. [0]
  • Only 58% of organizations fully understand the value of project management. [1]
  • 93% of organizations report using standardized project management practices. [1]
  • 68% more than 2/3rd of organizations in ‘s annual survey said that they used outsourced or contract project managers in 2018. [1]
  • Only 23% of organizations use standardized project management practices across the entire organization. [1]
  • 33% use standardized practices, but not across all departments. [1]
  • While a small portion 7% of organizations don’t use any standard practices at all. [1]
  • Coincidentally, 55% of organizations don’t have access to real. [1]
  • Between 2017 and 2018, the percentage of organizations using spreadsheets to manage their agile projects dropped from 74% to 67%. [1]
  • 56% of organizations have used only one project management system. [1]
  • Only 41% of organizations with an enterprise wide project management office report that it is highly aligned to the organization’s strategy. [1]
  • 80% of highperformance organizations Champions have a PMO. [1]
  • 72% say that there is a strong alignment of the EPMO to their organizational strategy. [1]
  • 95% of large firms reported having dedicated PMOs, either in specific departments or across the entire organization. [1]
  • In contrast, only 75% of small firms had dedicated PMOs. [1]
  • In 2016, PMOs delivered a 33% improvement in projects delivered under budget, 27% improvement in customer satisfaction, 25% increase in productivity, and 25% reduction in failed projects. [1]
  • In 2016, the average PMO accounted for nearly 5% of the project budget and had a staff size of 9. [1]
  • 49% of project managers report to the PMO (up from 42% in 2012). [1]
  • Incidentally, highperformance organizations had far higher percentage of project managers reporting to the PMO than lowperforming organizations 68% vs 53%. [1]
  • 50% of respondents in a survey said that their biggest challenge is that PMO processes are seen as overhead. [1]
  • 42% said that their organizations are resistant to change and adopting new PM methodologies. [1]
  • 41% said that their biggest challenge is demonstrating the added value of the PMO. [1]
  • Risk management practices are widely used across most organizations 27% say they ‘always’ use them, while 35% use the ‘sometimes’. [1]
  • Only 3% of surveyed organizations say they ‘never’ use risk management practices. [1]
  • Among senior leaders, 87% say that they “fully” understand the importance of PM practices. [1]
  • Only 32% of organizations say that they’re satisfied with their current PM maturity level. [1]
  • 67% would rank their department’s PM maturity level at 3 or more. [1]
  • However, only 47% would rank their organization wide PM maturity at level 3 or higher. [1]
  • In PMI’s 2017 survey, 62% of successfully completed projects had sponsors who were actively supportive. [1]
  • 78% of respondents in a Geneca survey also said that they’d like business stakeholders to be more responsive and engaged in the project. [1]
  • Another study found that 33% of projects fail because of a lack of involvement from senior management. [1]
  • A whopping 97% of organizations believe that project management is critical to business performance and organizational success, according to a PwC study. [1]
  • Businesses say that the biggest impact of project management was on team communication (52%). [1]
  • 44% also said that it improved the quality of the final product, while 38% said that it improved customer satisfaction. [1]
  • Only 42% of respondents in Wellingtone’s survey that this role is occupied by a professional Project Manager in their organization. [1]
  • In 2018, nearly 70% of projects met their original goals or business intent, while nearly 60% were completed within the original budget. [1]
  • Both these figures are up from 62% and 50% respectively in 2016. [1]
  • Compared to 2017, 71% of organizations reported a lack of funding as their top project management challenge, while 49% more organizations reported an inconsistency in approach. [1]
  • A survey published in HBR found that the average IT project overran its budget by 27%. [1]
  • Moreover, at least one in six IT projects turns into a “black swan” with a cost overrun of 200% and a schedule overrun of 70%. [1]
  • An IT project with a budget over $1M is 50% more likely to fail than one with a budget below $350,000. [1]
  • A PwC study of over 10,640 projects found that a tiny, tiny portion of companies 2.5% completed 100% of their projects successfully. [1]
  • According to CIO, organizations that use proven PM practices waste 28x less money than their more haphazard counterparts. [1]
  • 80% of respondents in a Geneca survey said that they spend half their time on rework. [1]
  • Only 55% of people involved in projects team leaders and project managers feel that the project’s business objectives are clear to them. [1]
  • More than 80% also feel that the requirements process doesn’t articulate the needs of the business. [1]
  • And when the project is wrapped up, only 23% of respondents say that project managers and stakeholders are in agreement when a project is done. [1]
  • To give you an idea of the abysmal success rate of most projects, only 40% of projects at IBM meet the company’s three key goals schedule, budget, and quality. [1]
  • 17% of IT projects can go so bad that they can threaten the very existence of the company. [1]
  • The biggest reason for any dissatisfaction remains price (56%), followed by a lack of features (33%). [1]
  • 64% and 67% of projects with high maturity of PM processes are delivered on time and within budget, respectively. [1]
  • The equivalent figures for low maturity organizations are just 36% and 43%. [1]
  • 83% of high performance organizations make an ongoing investment in project manager training. [1]
  • 77% of such organizations have formal processes to develop PM competency. [1]
  • In contrast, only 34% of underperformers offer similar training. [1]
  • 51% of respondents in PMI’s 2018 survey said that soft skills are more important today, while only 19% said that this skill requirement is unchanged. [1]
  • 81% of these organizations prioritize the development of technical skills (vs 13% of underperformers). [1]
  • Despite low maturity levels, only 48% organizations have invested in accredited project management training. [1]
  • 15% use non accredited training or courses, while more than 25% don’t invest in any training at all. [1]
  • 60% of PMOs now have a formal project management training program, up from 11% in 2014. [1]
  • Incidentally, high performing organizations are far more likely to have a training program than low performers (85% vs 38%). [1]
  • Most PMOs (79%). [1]
  • However, a significant and growing number (51%). [1]
  • 60% of workers felt that Coronavirus affected their work life balance between March and June 2020. [10]
  • Despite time tracking apps, hints, and tips being available, only 17% of people track their time. [10]
  • 46% of stress reported amongst employees in the US is caused by an overwhelming workload 87% of students could achieve better grades if they possessed better organization and time management skills. [10]
  • 13 years to be exact, according to recent time management work statistics. [10]
  • 22% of cohorts that set goals saw an improvement in performance in academics in 2020. [10]
  • 2021 Statistics about time management show that 88% of people who don’t set goals fail to see a better academic outcome. [10]
  • Only 15% of employers offer the 40hrs/week schedule as of 2020. [10]
  • Whooping 75% of employers in the US offer 40+ hours per week schedules, which translates to eight hours per week. [10]
  • Going on Facebook accounted for 16 minutes of wasted time during, according to upto date statistics for time management. [10]
  • 11% of organizations admit that accounting tasks gave them sleepless nights in 2020. [10]
  • Time management statistics show that 87% of students could achieve better grades if they had better time management skills. [10]
  • Furthermore, 50% of students said they do not make use of one single system to arrange their lecture notes, contacts, research, and assignments. [10]
  • According to student time management statistics, students should set aside 20 hours per week for learning. [10]
  • Around 60% of the working day enables teachers to teach. [10]
  • According to statistics on poor time management, employees in the United Kingdom spent about 2 hours procrastinating daily. [10]
  • 52% of North American employers expect their workers to telecommute in Q1 of 2021. [10]
  • 37% of businesses in North America did not have a flexible working policy in place in 2020. [10]
  • According to statistics for time management, entrepreneurs used 19% of their productive time on tasks that accountants/bookkeepers could do for them. [10]
  • Sole traders had it even rougher, with 31% of their week going to duties in the same area. [10]
  • According to time management statistics, 60% of survey participants had a hard time balancing work and home life during the period. [10]
  • 57% of employees working remotely said they had high job satisfaction. [10]
  • Only 50% of their counterparts who work from offices felt the same. [10]
  • According to time management and stress statistics, Denmark staff worked the least amount of hours per week on average. [10]
  • 11% of the survey respondents worked more than 40 hours per week. [10]
  • According to time management statistics for 2021, 66% of employees experienced extreme fatigue at some point in their careers. [10]
  • A staggering 79% of employees will quit after receiving inadequate appreciation from their managers. [11]
  • 69% of Millennials are concerned that their workplace does not develop their leadership skills. [11]
  • The number of women on boards of directors is only 15%. [11]
  • In business, 83% of companies say developing leaders is crucial. [11]
  • Leadership quality is viewed as high by 48% of leaders in their current organizations, up from 34% in 2011. [11]
  • Developing the next generation of leaders is the top challenge for 55% of CEOs according to a recent survey63% of millennials believe they aren’t being fully developed as leaders by their employers for management positions. [11]
  • In fact, only 11% of HR leaders feel they have a strong bench that can take over leadership roles as they open up leading to increased leadership gaps. [11]
  • Among employees and business leaders, three out of five (59%) say their organizations take some steps to guard against burnout, even though nearly a third (29%). [11]
  • Almost 60% of leaders reported feeling worn out at the end of each day, which can be an indication of burnout. [11]
  • One recent survey found that 44% of leaders who feel worn and used up planned to move to a new company in order to advance their careers. [11]
  • 26% of those same respondents plan to leave their current company within one year. [11]
  • Approximately 44% of leaders who feel used up at the end of the day expected to change companies in order to advance; 26% expected to leave within the next year. [11]
  • One survey of more than 1,000 high potential workers found that 86% of them felt exhausted by the end of the day, an increase of 27% over the previous year. [11]
  • Leadership training investments were estimated at with $165.3 billion from North America. [11]
  • $357.7 billion worldwide in 2020, Study results show that participants undergoing leadership training improved their learning capacity by 25% and their performance by 20%. [11]
  • One recent survey of 2000 professionals found that 76% report that work stress has negatively impacted their relationships and 66 % report stress. [11]
  • A small but significant number, 16%, say they’ve had to quit a job losing sleep because of work. [11]
  • Among those surveyed, 35% identify their boss as a major source of stress at work, and 80% say that a change in direct management or leadership has an impact on their stress levels. [11]
  • More than 77 % of organizations report that leadership is lacking, and while that is a big number it should not come as a surprise given that 10,000 Baby Boomers retire every single day. [11]
  • At the same time, 83% of businesses say it’s important to develop leaders at all levels. [11]
  • Yet less than 5% of companies have implemented leadership development across all levels. [11]
  • Half of the respondents said their companies lacked sufficient leadership talent, and 47 % predicted there would be a shortage of leadership or executive level skills in the future. [11]
  • Women’s representation in senior management grew from 23 to 28 percent between January 2015 and January 2020, while representation in the C suite increased from 17 to 21 percent. [11]
  • Just 29 %of senior leadership positions in the world are held by women. [11]
  • 87% percent of mid sized companies worldwide will have at least one woman in senior management positions. [11]
  • Formal in person training39%Assessment to diagnose leadership strength42%Developmental Assignments48%External Coaching48%ConclusionBusiness is constantly changing and will always require adaptation. [11]
  • Formal in person training39%Assessment to diagnose leadership. [11]
  • The results show that 66.1% of the respondents were male and 32.1% were female. [3]
  • The other 1.3% of respondents preferred not to state their gender. [3]
  • According to McKinsey & Company, almost 80% of product managers are involved in design activities. [3]
  • The same organization reports that “60 percent of product managers have basic analytics skills that enable them to dive into metrics and draw insights without relying on analysts”. [3]
  • Consequently, product managers report that they spend 52% of their time on unplanned fire. [3]
  • A Wall Street Journal article reported that 7% of Harvard Business School graduates took jobs in product management. [3]
  • With an average salary of$188,924, and the kind of reputation that the company holds across the world, many people are likely to see this company as a place that would provide job security and a great working environment. [3]
  • According to the results, 26% of the product managers polled had 3 5 years’ work experience. [3]
  • This was followed by 24% with 6 10 years’ work experience. [3]
  • The study also showed that about 39% of the polled sample were within the ages of 35 44 years of age. [3]
  • According to a Product School survey, 55% of product managers prefer working for smallto medium enterprises because of such enterprises’ flexibility and willingness to try new things. [3]
  • The proportion of product managers who prefer to work for bigger companies with more resources and better compensation is 45%. [3]
  • The other 5% report that they would work for any company that meets their personal preferences. [3]
  • According to LinkedIn’s ‘The Most In Demand Hard and Soft Skills of 2020’, AI, data, and UX design are the top three hard skills that will be the most sought after in the future amongst product managers. [3]
  • Buyers of a median price home are looking at a monthly mortgage payment that is almost 50% higher than it was a year ago.’. [12]
  • The 30 year mortgage rate dips slightly to 5.1%. [12]
  • A whopping 79% of employees will quit their jobs due to lack of appreciation from leaders. [13]
  • 69% of Millennials believe there is a lack of leadership development in the workplace. [13]
  • Only 15% of women have board of director roles in the workplace. [13]
  • 91% of Millennials will stay in their jobs for fewer than three years 83% of enterprises. [13]
  • Only 5% of companies have integrated leadership development in their corporations. [13]
  • While 83% of employers agree that it’s crucial to develop their employees’ skills, only 5% of corporations actually implement these improvements. [13]
  • Another study showed that 71% of Millennials will leave their job within two and three years if they feel their leadership skills are lacking and there’s no room for growth. [13]
  • According to these employee turnover statistics, 8 in 10 employees quit if they don’t receive valuable appreciation. [13]
  • that reasonable pay is important, while 54% consider fair treatment as crucial in developing a positive work culture. [13]
  • According to women leadership statistics, females have shown to have more resilience than men. [13]
  • Females earn 59% of master’s degrees, 48.5% of law degrees, and 47.5% in medical qualifications. [13]
  • Furthermore, only 8.57% of all legal representatives are women of color. [13]
  • Did you know that 82% of people don’t have a dedicated time management system?. [4]
  • The latest data as of April 2021 points to a stunning 60.1% of the world’s population being regular internet users. [4]
  • The penetration rate of internet users is the highest in Northern Europe — at 97%. [4]
  • In Northern America, it’s at 90.7%, in Southern America, it’s 72%, and in Central America , it’s 66.9%. [4]
  • Fun fact — the number of social media users is 4.33 billion, meaning that only 5% of Internet users don’t have a profile on a social network. [4]
  • A stunning 92.8% of internet users are regularly online on their mobile devices. [4]
  • Moreover, the Yo Y increase in an average mobile connection speed is 58.8% for download and 17.4% for upload. [4]
  • Finding new information (63.3%) Staying in touch with family and friends (56.6%) Keeping up to date with events and news (55.6%). [4]
  • Watching videos, TV shows, and movies (52.5%). [4]
  • Getting inspired or finding new ideas (47.6%) Listening to music (46.4%). [4]
  • Research of brands and products (46.4%). [4]
  • General browsing and spending of free time (44.5%). [4]
  • Studying and education (42.8%) Research related to places and traveling (38.7%). [4]
  • Research on health matters and products (36.2%). [4]
  • Meeting new people (30.8%). [4]
  • According to the latest 2021 research, a staggering 82% of people don’t use any time management system. [4]
  • Still, 33% reported relying on such simple to do lists to manage their work. [4]
  • Furthermore, 25% said they simply first deal with what feels most important, while 24% rely on their email inboxes to manage their priorities and, in accordance, their time. [4]
  • Writing a schedule in a diary or a planner is what around 12% reported doing — and, this does count as a TM system. [4]
  • Time management statistics also reveal that the remaining 6% use specific methods — Time boxing, Pomodoro technique, Eisenhower matrix, and Eat that frog, mentioned by their popularity, in the declining order. [4]
  • However, organization and time management statistics indicate that 49% of people never carried out a time audit. [4]
  • Further 31% said they do it occasionally, while only 20% do so regularly. [4]
  • According to research by Sleep Score Labs, people in Finland get the most sleep per night — 7 hours and 5 minutes. [4]
  • What’s interesting is that more than half (54%). [4]
  • Namely, 20% of respondents struggle with their performance due to the lack of IT knowledge, and 15% said they are too embarrassed to ask for help while they are stuck with an office suite. [4]
  • Time management statistics provide the explanation as well — it’s the fact that, on average, employees spend 21% of the time they should be working during work hours on entertainment, social media, and news instead. [4]
  • Another common reason for procrastination is chatting with colleagues — survey results found on Statista show that 80% of workers agree about this. [4]
  • Another reason is office noise with 70%, closely followed by 61% of those being overwhelmed by changes at work. [4]
  • Meetings and social media complete the top 5 list with 60% and 56%. [4]
  • 80% of workers reported they were either actively disengaged or not engaged enough at work, so productivity levels dropped significantly. [4]
  • Time management and productivity statistics reveal that this loss of productivity cost the global economy $8.1 trillion, according to the same Gallup’s report. [4]
  • That’s close to 10% of Gross Domestic Product. [4]
  • The previously mentioned Gallup’s report also shows some eye opening time management and stress statistics — 43% of workers said they are trying to cope with stress daily. [4]
  • Furthermore, 24% said the same for anger, and 25% for sadness. [4]
  • The number implies they also work on weekends, which was the case for 79% of participants. [4]
  • Moreover, the percentage of those who also work during their vacation days is almost as high — 70%. [4]
  • According to statistics on time management for business meetings, CEOs attend points to a weekly average of 37 business meetings. [4]
  • Meaning — business meetings consume about 72% of their time. [4]
  • Out of those 37 meetings, 38% were the ones that lasted over an hour, 32% were the ones that lasted approximately an hour, and only 30% that lasted shorter than an hour. [4]
  • In Mercer’s survey results, we can see that 83.36% of companies said they are considering implementing this flexible hours strategy at a greater scale than before the pandemic. [4]
  • The top spot for future investments in this segment went to connection tools (46.42%). [4]
  • The second most important category (36.77%). [4]
  • The exact same percentage (36.77%). [4]
  • Research by PwC on productivity levels indicates only 2% of companies who track their performance don’t feel they need additional measures for improvement. [4]
  • Another 3% reported they don’t see any obstacles. [4]
  • Time management and productivity statistics show financial matters are the biggest obstacle in reaching the desired goals, in this case for 44%. [4]
  • Other relevant obstacles were time restraint (39%) employee resistance (38%) resources distributed to crisis management (36%). [4]
  • the lack of technology tools (28%). [4]
  • When it comes to the frequency of productivity audits, 11% of organizations whose value doesn’t exceed $5 billion report conducting them on an hourly basis, measuring the productivity of a specific task. [4]
  • Confirming the direct relation of time management and success, statistics point to 25% for organizations valued at over $5 billion that conduct hourly tracking. [4]
  • Multiple follow up studies revealed another supporting claim — 75% of poorly performing employees who took specific actions rose to acceptable levels, or even higher. [4]
  • In 2020, 64% of the organizations reported adopting this method. [4]
  • The IT sector is the most common one for the said approach (57% of the surveyed organizations implementing it). [4]
  • It’s followed by finance (46%), business development (40%), operations (38%), and digital transformation (38%). [4]
  • Time management statistics show that 47% of college students believe so. [4]
  • Despite being digital natives, 48% of those who have a system manage their tasks by writing them down by hand. [4]
  • More than a half, 54% exactly, said their grades and overall performance would be better if they had better organizational skills. [4]
  • The lowest percentage of students who procrastinate was around 50%, while the highest went up to a whopping 95%. [4]
  • However, it may also be that the lower percentage had something to do with the fact that research was conducted 7 years later. [4]
  • Regardless of how the students had used the time in between, when given a full week to complete a task, 58% submitted it on the last day. [4]
  • Effective time management statistics from another study pointed out the same — 76% of students who submitted their assignments early got higher scores. [4]
  • On the other hand, this was the case for only 60% of the procrastinators. [4]
  • In a recent study on motivational factors, receiving recognition — a traditionally extrinsic motivator — was ranked at the top, for 49% of students. [4]
  • Time management statistics indicate the practical study approach breaks the procrastination pattern for 22% of students, followed by collaborative work with 18% of students. [4]
  • The tremendous results from Iceland led to 86% of the country’s workforce either already working shorter hours or gaining the right to do so in the near future. [4]
  • The research with a sample of 2.3 million people indicates that taking a hike or a walk on your own raises mood by 2%. [4]
  • If that activity is shared with a friend, the percentage is at 7.5% and even higher, at 8.9% if shared with a partner. [4]
  • On average, it’s estimated that people who complete all of the REM and non REM stages during one night dream for 2 full hours. [4]
  • The latest data points to 55% of Americans not using their vacation days. [4]
  • Time management statistics indicate that, despite 83% reporting they want to use their vacation days to travel, most of them don’t get to do it. [4]
  • The total loss from missing opportunities and travel spend is estimated at $151.5 billion. [4]
  • In 2016, a government survey revealed almost 25% of Japanese employees worked a whopping 80 hours of overtime per month. [4]
  • Also, workers in Japan on average didn’t take 10 of their vacation days — and 63% of those who did felt guilty. [4]
  • According to Harvard Business Review, there are 3 main categories of skills to develop Awareness. [4]
  • According to Gladwell’s theory, it takes approximately 10,000 hours to master a complex skill. [4]
  • Effective time management statistics reveal there are 5 vital habits that such people share, according to Forbes Learning how to multitask in a productive way Using the technology to shorten the in person meetings time Creating a routine. [4]
  • The State of Work Life Balance in 2019. [4]
  • it takes up to 20% of the overall project budget. [2]
  • Editor’s Choice 70% of all projects fail. [2]
  • 42% of companies don’t understand the need or importance of project management. [2]
  • 62% of successfully completed projects had supportive sponsors. [2]
  • The percentage of projects that fail is fairly high a whopping 70% of all projects fail to deliver what was promised to customers. [2]
  • Organizations that undervalue project management see 50% more of their projects failing. [2]
  • 3. 9.9% of every dollar is wasted due to poor performance. [2]
  • The latest project management stats show that 58% of organizations fully understand the value of implementing project management as a way to achieve better performance. [2]
  • This means that 42% of companies undervalue the importance of project management as a crucial component for project success. [2]
  • The Pulse project management statistics show that high performing organizations with proven PM practices in place have met their original goals 2.5 times more often (89% vs. 34%). [2]
  • 75% of respondents in the IT industry lack confidence in project success. [2]
  • Out of this 75%, 27% constantly feel this way. [2]
  • At the same time, the majority of respondents (80%). [2]
  • 44% of projects fail due to a lack of alignment between business and project objectives. [2]
  • They have further reported that only 31% of their projects were delivered within 10% of the budget and 25% within 10% of the original timeframe. [2]
  • Organizations with a higher percentage (more than 80%) actively engaged sponsors to have 40% more successful projects than organizations with a lower percentage of projects (less than 50%). [2]
  • At the same time, 55% of organizations don’t have access to real. [2]
  • The percentage of organizations using spreadsheets to manage their agile projects dropped from 74% to 67%. [2]
  • Jira follows with 19.50%, while Trello comes in third with 5.51%. [2]
  • 93% of organizations use standardized project management practices. [2]
  • Consistent practices reduce the risk and lead to better results which is why the majority (93%). [2]
  • Project management statistics show that 73% of organizations that use formal project management approach always or often have met the goal or intent. [2]
  • 63% have completed the projects within budget and 59% have delivered the projects on time. [2]
  • By comparison, only 58% of organizations that rarely/never use formal PM methods have met the initial goals, 48% complete the projects within budget, and 43% have delivered the projects on time. [2]
  • 44% of high performing organizations use predictive approaches. [2]
  • 44% of the high performers use predictive approaches, 30% use agile methods, while 23% leverage hybrid approaches. [2]
  • Only 4% of high performing organizations use other methods. [2]
  • Multitasking causes a 40% productivity drop. [2]
  • If you try to do everything by yourself, you could see a productivity drop by 40%. [2]
  • 83% of high performing organizations have ongoing project management training. [2]
  • 81% further prioritize the development of project management technical skills and 79% prioritize the development of project management leadership skills. [2]
  • The project management statistics for low performers in these areas are 34%, 13%, and 11%, respectively. [2]
  • Nearly 70% of projects met their original goals or business intent. [2]
  • In 2016, 62% of projects met the original business goals and only 50% were completed within the set budget. [2]
  • In 2018, these numbers went up to 70% and 60%, respectively. [2]
  • 60% of respondents point to poor resource management as their biggest challenge. [2]
  • Other issues included poorly trained project sponsors (33%) ineffective PPM solution deployment (30%), and lack of governance (26%). [2]
  • Roughly 50% of the respondents say so. [2]
  • Risk management comes in second with 40%, followed by planning with 35%, and resource management with 25%. [2]
  • 68% of projects don’t have an effective project sponsor. [2]
  • Project management statistics show that almost a third of organizations (27%). [2]
  • Only 3% of the respondents have said they never use risk management practices. [2]
  • Also, 78% of respondents in the Geneca project management survey have said they would like the business stakeholders to be more engaged in the project. [2]
  • 87% of senior project managers fully understand the importance of PM practices. [2]
  • Among them, 87% have said they completely understand the importance of PM practices. [2]
  • On the other hand, the lack of involvement from senior management is the main reason why 33% of projects fail. [2]
  • 80% of high performing organizations have reported using project management practices which further highlights this notion. [2]
  • The estimates show that the project management costs range between 7% and 11% of the project’s total cost. [2]
  • When adding project control support, this figure might jump to 9. [2]

I know you want to use Skills Management Software, thus we made this list of best Skills Management Software. We also wrote about how to learn Skills Management Software and how to install Skills Management Software. Recently we wrote how to uninstall Skills Management Software for newbie users. Don’t forgot to check latest Skills Management statistics of 2024.

Reference


  1. pumble – https://pumble.com/learn/communication/communication-statistics/.
  2. workamajig – https://www.workamajig.com/blog/project-management-statistics.
  3. teamstage – https://teamstage.io/project-management-statistics/.
  4. theproductmanager – https://theproductmanager.com/general/statistics-career-product-management/.
  5. clockify – https://clockify.me/time-management-statistics.
  6. predictiveindex – https://www.predictiveindex.com/blog/25-people-manager-stats-2019/.
  7. bls – https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/management-analysts.htm.
  8. amstat – https://chance.amstat.org/2015/04/setting-the-stage/.
  9. sfmagazine – https://sfmagazine.com/technotes/december-2018-math-and-statistics-the-skills-needed-in-management-accounting/.
  10. development-academy – https://development-academy.co.uk/news-tips/time-management-statistics-2021-research/.
  11. techjury – https://techjury.net/blog/time-management-statistics/.
  12. apollotechnical – https://www.apollotechnical.com/leadership-statistics/.
  13. marketwatch – https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/skills-management-software-market-size-industry-2024-demand-share-business-growth-business-statistics-and-research-methodology-by-forecast-to-2029-2024-04-08.
  14. goremotely – https://goremotely.net/blog/leadership-statistics/.

How Useful is Skills Management

In a world that is constantly evolving, where technological advancements reshape industries overnight, it is imperative for organizations to adapt and stay relevant. Skills management plays a vital role in facilitating this adaptation by ensuring that the right skills are available within a company at any given time. By identifying the skills gaps present among employees, organizations can take proactive measures to close those gaps, whether through training, hiring, or redistributing responsibilities.

One of the key benefits of skills management is its ability to enhance employee productivity and job satisfaction. When employees are equipped with the necessary skills to excel in their roles, they are more likely to feel confident and satisfied with their work. This sense of fulfillment can have a significant impact on their productivity levels, ultimately benefiting both the employees themselves and the organization as a whole. Furthermore, skills management fosters a culture of continuous growth and development within a company, making it an attractive place for top talents to thrive.

Skills management is also instrumental in creating agile and adaptable organizations. By regularly assessing employee skills and keeping a finger on the pulse of industry trends, companies can make informed decisions about where to invest resources and pursue new opportunities. This flexibility enables organizations to take advantage of emerging technologies, remain competitive in the market, and respond proactively to changes in customer demands.

Moreover, skills management contributes to optimal resource allocation and employee engagement. By having an in-depth understanding of the skills possessed by each employee, organizations can strategically match the right people to the right tasks. This ensures that projects are efficiently executed, deadlines are met, and overall productivity is maximized. Additionally, by leveraging the strengths and interests of employees, skills management can play a significant role in boosting employee morale and engagement, leading to higher job satisfaction, improved retention rates, and a positive work environment.

Skills management is not only useful at an organizational level but also at an individual level. By providing employees with opportunities for continuous learning and skill enhancement, organizations can not only empower their workforce but also help individuals reach their full potential. This can result in increased job satisfaction, personal growth, and career progression, ultimately benefiting both the individuals and the organizations they belong to.

In conclusion, skills management is a highly useful practice that should be prioritized by organizations seeking to thrive in a rapidly changing world. It enhances employee productivity and satisfaction, fosters adaptability, aids in resource allocation and engagement, and facilitates professional development. While gathering data and utilizing statistics may tout the effectiveness of skills management, the impact it has on organizations and individuals speaks for itself. Any organization serious about achieving success should value and invest in skills management.

In Conclusion

Be it Skills Management benefits statistics, Skills Management usage statistics, Skills Management productivity statistics, Skills Management adoption statistics, Skills Management roi statistics, Skills Management market statistics, statistics on use of Skills Management, Skills Management analytics statistics, statistics of companies that use Skills Management, statistics small businesses using Skills Management, top Skills Management systems usa statistics, Skills Management software market statistics, statistics dissatisfied with Skills Management, statistics of businesses using Skills Management, Skills Management key statistics, Skills Management systems statistics, nonprofit Skills Management statistics, Skills Management failure statistics, top Skills Management statistics, best Skills Management statistics, Skills Management statistics small business, Skills Management statistics 2024, Skills Management statistics 2021, Skills Management statistics 2024 you will find all from this page. 🙂

We tried our best to provide all the Skills Management statistics on this page. Please comment below and share your opinion if we missed any Skills Management statistics.




Leave a Comment