Taxi & Limousine Statistics 2024 – Everything You Need to Know

Steve Bennett
Business Formation Expert  |   Fact Checked by Editorial Team
Last updated: 
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Are you looking to add Taxi & Limousine to your arsenal of tools? Maybe for your business or personal use only, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to know more about the most important Taxi & Limousine statistics of 2024.

My team and I scanned the entire web and collected all the most useful Taxi & Limousine stats on this page. You don’t need to check any other resource on the web for any Taxi & Limousine statistics. All are here only 🙂

How much of an impact will Taxi & Limousine have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your business? Should you invest in Taxi & Limousine? We will answer all your Taxi & Limousine related questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word. 🙂

Best Taxi & Limousine Statistics

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 349 Taxi & Limousine Statistics on this page 🙂

Taxi & Limousine Market Statistics

  • In March 2020, Uber controlled 69% of the US ridesharing market, and Lyft controlled 30%, for a total of 99% of the US ride. [0]
  • (4.7%), failure to yield the rightof way (4.6%), and careless driving (4.4%). [0]
  • (15.1%), failure to yield the rightof. [0]

Taxi & Limousine Latest Statistics

  • Available to download in PNG, PDF, XLS format 33% off until Jun 30th. [1]
  • Largest Mainline Protestant churches in the U.S. 2010, by adherents Largest Mainline Protestant churches in the U.S. 2010, by congregations Number of religious adherents in the U.S. 2010, by state Percentage of religious population in the U.S. 2010, by state. [1]
  • Additional information, including the hourly and annual 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentile wages, is available in the downloadable XLS files. [2]
  • The number of people employed in the Taxi & Limousine Services industry in the US increased 6.7% on average over the five years between 2017 and 2024. [3]
  • This represents a 263% increase in employment when compared to May 2020. [4]
  • According to ACS estimates, the number of people employed in the Taxi & limousine service Industry Group has been growing at a rate of 9.82%, , from 379k people in 2018 to 416k people in 2019. [4]
  • Taxi drivers represent the largest share of positions held in Taxi & limousine service at 77.5%, followed by Shuttle drivers and chauffeurs with 8.16% and Motor vehicle operators,. [4]
  • Gender Composition 80.8% of workers in the Taxi & limousine service Industry Group are Male, making them the more common gender in the workforce. [4]
  • 6.1 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6. [5]
  • blacks (RRadj 2.3 [95% CI 1.63.4]), Hispanics (RRadj 2.1 [95% CI 1.33.4]), and drivers in the South (RRadj 2.7 [95% CI 1.9 3.9]). [5]
  • bTime of incident was unknown for 37 (10.1%) taxi/limo industry workers and 1208 (13.4%). [5]
  • Large employers, those with more than five hundred persons on payroll, accounted for 0% of the total establishments. [6]
  • In 2021, EVs accounted for nearly 5% of SUVs and sedans sold and more than 20% of all passenger vehicles sold. [0]
  • This is up sharply from the 2% of passenger vehicle sales in 2018. [0]
  • In 2019–2020, a survey of about 5,000 US residents ages 16 and older found that 88.3% of respondents drove at least occasionally and made an average of 2.5 driving trips daily. [0]
  • In 2019–2020, a survey of about 5,000 US residents ages 16 and older found that 97% of respondents aged 35–49 drove at least occasionally, a larger percentage than for any other age group. [0]
  • In 2019–2020, the percentage of US residents ages 16 and older who reported that they drove at least occasionally varied by education level. [0]
  • 97% of college graduates drove at least occasionally, compared with 85% of residents who did not graduate from high school. [0]
  • In 2019–2020, 94% of male US residents ages 16 and older drove at least occasionally, whereas 93% of female residents did. [0]
  • Among US residents ages 16 and older in 2019–2020, 96% of white residents, 90% of Hispanic residents, and 88% of black residents drove at least occasionally. [0]
  • In 2017, 28% of vehicle miles traveled by households were for traveling to or from work, 25% for social or recreational purposes, 17% for family errands, 15% for shopping, and another 15% for traveling to or from school or church. [0]
  • The percentage of teenagers who hold a driver’s license has declined since the 1980s. [0]
  • For example, in 1983, 46.2% of 16yearolds held a driver’s license; in 2018, only 25.6% of 16year olds held a driver’s license. [0]
  • In 2021, the largest single category of registered on road motorcycles was cruisers (39.9% of registered motorcycles), followed by touring motorcycles (23.1%). [0]
  • In 2018, 8.02% of US households owned motorcycles. [0]
  • In 2018, 81% of motorcycle owners were male, and 19% were female. [0]
  • In 2019, there were 37.9 million trucks registered and used for business purposes , representing 23.9% of all trucks registered. [0]
  • An online survey of 2,097 truck drivers in August–September 2021 found that 68.6% of OO/IC respondents were part of small operations , whereas 72.7% of Company Driver respondents worked for fleets with 21 – 1,000+ trucks. [0]
  • Five axle flatbed trucks were more common among OO/ICs leased to a motor carrier (22.6%) and OO/ICs with their own authority to transport freight (17.6%) than among Company Drivers (5.8%). [0]
  • On the other hand, 5 axle tanker trucks were more common among Company Drivers (9.7%) than among OO/ICs leased to a motor carrier (4.6%) or OO/ICs with their own authority (2.5%). [0]
  • 73.9% of OO/IC respondents reported average length of haul exceeding 500 miles per trip. [0]
  • Among Company Driver respondents, 55.4% reported operating local or regional trips of less than 500 miles per trip. [0]
  • Among Company Drivers, the top three motivating factors were Job Security/Stability (88.5%), Income (83.1%), and Healthcare/Retirement Savings (79.1%). [0]
  • However, only 59.5% of Company Drivers reported being satisfied with their Healthcare/Retirement Savings. [0]
  • Among female Company Drivers, 84.3% indicated Healthcare/Retirement Savings was an important motivating factor for becoming a Company Driver, and 68.6% of female drivers reported being satisfied with Healthcare/Retirement Savings. [0]
  • Among OO/ICs, the top three motivating factors were Independence/Ability to Set Hours (94.8%). [0]
  • Schedule/Flexibility (93.6%), and Choice of Routes/Length of Haul (91.3%). [0]
  • In contrast with Company Drivers, only 39.2% of OO/ICs rated Healthcare/Retirement Savings as a top motivating factor. [0]
  • In 2018, speeding was the cause of 31% of motorcyclist fatalities, 18% of car driver fatalities, 14% of lighttruck driver fatalities, and 7% of large. [0]
  • Over 50% of the five million yearly car crashes in the United States are caused by aggressive drivers, with speeding being the most prevalent contributor to this statistic. [0]
  • Speeding killed 10,111 people in the US in 2016, accounting for more than a quarter (27%). [0]
  • Speed was a factor in 31% of US teen driver fatalities. [0]
  • 42% of the surveyed drivers said they don’t consider going 10 mph over the speed limit to be speeding. [0]
  • Another 10% said they don’t think a 20 mph increase is speeding. [0]
  • National data shows that even a 10 mph speed increase ups the risk of a crash by 9.1%. [0]
  • Drivers ages 1520 had the highest representation in speed related fatal crashes (32% and 22%). [0]
  • One study found that 18% of licensed American drivers would fail the knowledge test for a learner’s permit if they had to retake it. [0]
  • Another study found that nearly 40% would fail it. [0]
  • The passing score for the knowledge test is usually 80%. [0]
  • In 2010, the economic cost of traffic crashes was estimated to be about $242 billion, plus an additional $594 billion in societal costs resulting from the effects of these crashes on the victims, for a total cost of $836 billion. [0]
  • This total cost represented about 5.6% of the US Gross Domestic Product in 2010. [0]
  • Out of nearly six million vehicular crashes that occur every year in the United States, approximately 22% are weather. [0]
  • Rear end crashes are the most frequently occurring type of collision, accounting for approximately 29% of all crashes. [0]
  • In 16.7% of fatal large truck crashes in 2019, a passenger car rearended the truck; in 3.7%, the truck rear ended a passenger car. [0]
  • In 17.9% of fatal large truck crashes, an oncoming passenger car drifted into the truck’s lane ; in 2.2%, an oncoming large truck drifted into a passenger car’s lane. [0]
  • Of the 4,949 drivers of large trucks involved in fatal crashes in 2019, 354 (7%) were 25 years of age or younger, and 361 (7%). [0]
  • In comparison, 3 (1%) of the 232 drivers of buses in fatal crashes were 25 years of age or younger, and 33 (14%). [0]
  • In 2019, at least one driver related factor was recorded for 33% of the large truck drivers in fatal crashes, compared with 53% of the passenger car drivers in fatal crashes. [0]
  • For large truck drivers in fatal crashes in 2019, these were the most common driver related factors speeding (7.6%), distraction or inattention (5.3%). [0]
  • For passenger car drivers in fatal crashes in 2019, these were the most common driver related factors speeding (16.6%). [0]
  • , careless driving (6.6%), and distraction or inattention (6.3%). [0]
  • In fatal large truck crashes in 2019, 75.4% of the drivers had a valid commercial driver’s license ; 19.8% had no ; and many of the rest had a that was expired, revoked, or suspended. [0]
  • This represents about 1% of Canada’s annual Gross Domestic Product. [0]
  • 66% of traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving. [0]
  • 37% of aggressive driving incidents involve a firearm. [0]
  • Male and younger drivers ages 19 39 were significantly more likely to engage in aggressive behaviors. [0]
  • 2% of drivers admit to trying to run an aggressor off the road at least once. [0]
  • In 2014, 0.7% of drivers admitted to regularly blocking other vehicles from changing lanes. [0]
  • 0.3% of drivers admitted to regularly cutting off other vehicles deliberately. [0]
  • 0.1% of drivers admitted to regularly bumping or ramming other vehicles intentionally. [0]
  • found that 45% of respondents admitted to speeding at 15 mph or more above the speed limit on a freeway in the past 30 days, 23% admitted to driving through a red light, and 21% admitted to tailgating another vehicle or switching lanes quickly. [0]
  • In 2019, pedestrians accounted for about 17% of all motor vehicle crash fatalities. [0]
  • The pedestrian death rate per 100,000 people decreased by 46% from 1975 to 2019. [0]
  • The death rate for pedestrians decreased by 93% for ages 0 12, and by 70% for ages 70 and older. [0]
  • Pedestrians have a 90% chance of surviving a crash at 30 kph or less but only a 50% chance at higher speeds. [0]
  • A pedestrian who is struck at 20 mph has a 10% chance of dying. [0]
  • A pedestrian struck at 40 mph has an 80% chance of dying. [0]
  • 74% of pedestrian fatalities happen at night, and 72% of those killed were not crossing at intersections. [0]
  • In 2018, 26% of pedestrian deaths in 2018 occurred in crashes between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m., and 24% occurred between 9 p.m. and midnight. [0]
  • 17% of all vehicle crashes occur during winter conditions. [0]
  • Freeway speeds are reduced by 3% to 13% in light snow and by 5% to 40% in heavy snow. [0]
  • Each year, 24% of weather related vehicle crashes occur on snowy, slushy or icy pavement and 15% happen during snowfall or sleet. [0]
  • Over 70% of the nation’s roads are located in snowy regions, which receive more than five inches average snowfall annually. [0]
  • Seventy percent of America’s population lives in areas that have snowy or icy conditions during the winter. [0]
  • In a 2021 survey of American drivers, 75.8% of respondents had driven on black ice, but 57.9% of respondents never used snow tires in the winter. [0]
  • 35.1% of respondents named an ice scraper as the most important tool to have in the winter, followed by gloves or mittens (28%) and sand or kitty litter (25.4%). [0]
  • 88% of them were 3 years of age or younger. [0]
  • 55% of them were one year of age or younger. [0]
  • 58% of police reported fatal car accidents in the US involved only one vehicle. [0]
  • In the United States, 36,096 people died in motor vehicle crashes in 2019, down 13.9% from 41,945 in 2000. [0]
  • In the United States in 2019, there were 11.0 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 population, down 26.2% from 14.9 per 100,000 population in 2000. [0]
  • In 2018 in Canada, there were 1,922 motor vehicle fatalities, up 3.6% from 2017. [0]
  • Car occupant deaths have declined 46% since 1975, while pickup occupant deaths have risen 25% and SUV occupant deaths are more than 10 times as high. [0]
  • Frontal impacts accounted for 54% of passenger vehicle occupant deaths in 2016. [0]
  • Side impacts accounted for another 25% of passenger vehicle occupant deaths. [0]
  • 74% of these rollovers followed a pre rollover impact; the other 26% occurred without hitting anything beforehand. [0]
  • In 2019, rollover crashes accounted for 20% of occupant deaths in cars, 38% of occupant deaths in pickup trucks, and 39% of occupant deaths in SUVs. [0]
  • In 2019, the rollover rate of SUVs in fatal crashes was 21.2%. [0]
  • 69% of the occupants killed in rollovers were not wearing seatbelts. [0]
  • 57% of the occupants killed in rollovers were ejected from the vehicle. [0]
  • In 2019, there were 6,358 rollover fatalities, a decline of 41.3% from the peak of 10,825 rollover fatalities in 2005. [0]
  • In 15.3% of fatal large truck crashes in 2019, the truck driver was killed; in 55.1%, the driver of another vehicle was killed. [0]
  • In 2.5% of fatal large truck crashes, a passenger in the truck was killed; in 15.5%, a passenger in another vehicle was killed. [0]
  • In 9.1% of fatal large truck crashes, a pedestrian was killed; in 1.8%, a cyclist was killed. [0]
  • In the European Union, there were 25,100 road fatalities in 2018, a decline of 21% compared with 2010. [0]
  • Nationwide, 50% of motor vehicle deaths in 2016 occurred in rural areas. [0]
  • In 2016, only 21% of the population lived in rural areas but 60% of crash fatalities occurred in rural areas. [0]
  • In 2017, there were 799 work zone traffic fatalities, up 2% from 2016. [0]
  • Highway rail grade crossing collisions and pedestrian trespass on tracks together constitute over 95% of all railroad fatalities in the United States. [0]
  • Since 1972, the number of train/motor vehicle collisions in the United States has declined by 83%. [0]
  • 591 (81.2%). [0]
  • 192 (26.4%). [0]
  • Motorcyclist deaths were more likely to occur in urban than in rural areas (60% vs. 38%). [0]
  • In 2018, 79% of bicyclists were killed in urban areas. [0]
  • In 2018, 37% of bicyclist deaths occurred at intersections. [0]
  • 81% of pedestrian deaths in 2018 occurred in urban areas, up from 59% in 1975. [0]
  • In 2018, 40% of pedestrian deaths among people aged 70 and older occurred at intersections, compared with 22% for those younger than 70. [0]
  • Among fatal large truck crashes in 2019, 27.3% occurred at intersections, 72.5% did not, and 0.2% were unknown. [0]
  • About 21% of motor vehicle crashes are weather related. [0]
  • 70% of weather related crashes happen on wet pavement, 46% during rainfall, 18% during snow or sleet, 16% on snowy or slushy pavement, 13% on icy pavement, and 3% in fog. [0]
  • In 2019, 80.2% of fatal large truck crashes occurred in good weather. [0]
  • Only 1.9% occurred in snow, and another 1.9% occurred under such limited visibility conditions as fog, smog, and smoke. [0]
  • In 2019, 62% of crash fatalities were passenger vehicle occupants, 17% were pedestrians, 14% were motorcyclists, 2% were bicyclists, and 2% were occupants of large trucks. [0]
  • 16% of these deaths were truck occupants, 67% were occupants of cars and other passenger vehicles, and 15% were pedestrians, bicyclists, or motorcyclists. [0]
  • In 2018, 96% of vehicle occupants killed in two vehicle crashes involving a passenger vehicle and a large truck were occupants of the passenger vehicle. [0]
  • In 2018, 74% of deaths in large truck crashes were in crashes involving tractortrailers and 27% were in crashes involving single. [0]
  • In 2018, 62% of large truck occupants killed in multiple vehicle crashes occurred in collisions involving another large truck. [0]
  • In 2019, 73% of fatal large truck crashes resulted from a collision with another vehicle. [0]
  • Only 9% resulted from a collision with a fixed object, and only 4% resulted from a rollover. [0]
  • However, 12.1% of fatal single vehicle large truck crashes resulted from a rollover, and 10.6% resulted from a collision with a bicycle or other personal conveyance. [0]
  • In 2018, 45% of large truck occupant deaths occurred in rollovers. [0]
  • 42% of SUV occupant deaths occurred in rollovers. [0]
  • Only 20% of occupant deaths in non SUV cars occurred in rollovers. [0]
  • In 2018, 31% of passenger vehicle occupants killed in twovehicle crashes with a large truck were in vehicles struck headon by the truck and another 24% were in vehicles that were side struck by the truck. [0]
  • 23% involved the front of the passenger vehicle striking the rear of the large truck. [0]
  • Motorcycles account for only 0.6% of all vehicle miles traveled, but motorcyclists account for 14% of all traffic fatalities and 17% of all occupant fatalities. [0]
  • While 20% of passenger vehicle crashes result in injury or death, 80% of motorcycle crashes result in injury or death. [0]
  • In 2018, 37% of motorcyclist deaths occurred in singlevehicle crashes, and 63% of motorcyclist deaths occurred in multiple. [0]
  • Among motorcycle drivers killed in 2018, 34% drove motorcycles with engine sizes larger than 1,400 cc, compared with 9% in 2000 and less than 1% in 1990. [0]
  • In 2018, 48% of motorcyclist deaths occurred on weekends, and those deaths were more likely to occur after 6 p.m. compared with weekdays. [0]
  • In 2018, 53% of motorcyclist deaths occurred on major roads other than interstates and freeways. [0]
  • By 2019, bicyclist deaths had decreased by 16% since 1975, but they had increased by 36% since reaching their lowest point in 2010. [0]
  • Ninety percent of bicyclist deaths in 2019 were among those aged 20 and older. [0]
  • Deaths among bicyclists younger than 20 have declined 90% since 1975, while deaths among bicyclists 20 and older have tripled. [0]
  • Since 1975, the decline in deaths among female bicyclists (34%) was about 3 times the decline among male bicyclists (12%). [0]
  • The decline in traffic deaths since 1975 among female bicyclists (38%) was triple the decline among male bicyclists (12%). [0]
  • In 2018, bicyclist deaths were highest (21%). [0]
  • In 2018, 63% of bicyclist deaths occurred on major roads other than interstates and freeways, and 29% occurred on minor roads. [0]
  • Deaths of bicyclists younger than 20 were more likely to occur on minor roads compared with deaths of bicyclists ages 20 and older. [0]
  • The rate of pedestrian deaths per 100,000 people decreased by 46% from 1975 to 2019. [0]
  • The pedestrian death rate for children ages 0 12 decreased by 93%. [0]
  • The death rate for pedestrians ages 70 and older declined by 74% from 1975. [0]
  • In 2019, pedestrian deaths accounted for 17% of all crash fatalities. [0]
  • Although pedestrian deaths were 17% lower in 2019 than in 1975, they had increased by 51% since reaching their lowest point in 2009. [0]
  • In 2018, 69% of pedestrians killed were male, a percentage that has varied little since 1975. [0]
  • In a study of US pedestrian crashes, the average risk of severe injury to a pedestrian was found to be 10% at 17 mph, 25% at 25 mph, 50% at 33 mph, 75% at 41 mph, and 90% at 48 mph. [0]
  • Fatalities by gender 74% of passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2016 were drivers; 71% of these were males. [0]
  • Male drivers were involved in 34% of fatal crashes in 2016, while female drivers were involved in 12%. [0]
  • In 2018, 71% of all motor vehicle crash deaths were males. [0]
  • Males accounted for 71% of passenger vehicle driver deaths, 48% of passenger vehicle passenger deaths, 97% of large truck driver deaths, 71% of large truck passenger deaths, 69% of pedestrian deaths, 86% of bicyclist deaths, and 91% of motorcyclist deaths. [0]
  • In 2019, 70% of pedestrians killed were males, a proportion that has varied little since 1975. [0]
  • In 1975, 75% of persons aged 13 19 who were killed in motor vehicle accidents were male. [0]
  • In the United States from 1975 to 2019, the rate of motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 people declined by 80% for children ages 12 and younger ,73% for teenagers , 49% for people ages 20. [0]
  • 30% for people ages 35 69 , and 45% for people 70 and older. [0]
  • Of these 844 children, 72.5% were car passengers, 16.4% were pedestrians, 3.6% were bicyclists, and the remainder died in some other way. [0]
  • In 2019, 34% of children ages 12 and under who were killed in passenger cars were unrestrained. [0]
  • In comparison, in 1985, 71% of children ages 12 and under who were killed in passenger cars were unrestrained. [0]
  • In 2019, teenagers accounted for 7% of motor vehicle crash deaths. [0]
  • They comprised 8% of passenger vehicle. [0]
  • occupant deaths among all ages, 4% of pedestrian deaths, 3% of motorcyclist deaths, 6% of bicyclist deaths, and 14% of all terrain vehicle rider deaths. [0]
  • In 2019, 78% of teenage crash deaths were of passenger vehicle occupants. [0]
  • The others were pedestrians (9%), motorcyclists (7%), bicyclists (2%), riders of all terrain vehicles (2%), and people in other kinds of vehicles (3%). [0]
  • In 2016, teenagers ages 14 19 years accounted for 74% of crash fatalities among children and died at more than 6 times the rate of children under 14. [0]
  • Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash. [0]
  • In 2019, 61% of deaths among passenger vehicle occupants ages 16 19 were of drivers. [0]
  • In 2019, 57% of the deaths of teenage passengers in passenger vehicles occurred in vehicles driven by another teenager. [0]
  • 13% of the deaths of passengers of all ages occurred when a teenager was driving. [0]
  • In the late 1970s, the proportion of fatally injured motorcyclists who were 50 and older started to increase, rising from 3% of all rider deaths in 1975 to 14% in 1997 and 37% in 2019. [0]
  • In contrast, 27% of the fatally injured motorcyclists in 2019 were younger than 30, compared with 80% in 1975. [0]
  • In 2019, distracted driving led to 3,142 fatalities, an estimated 424,000 injuries, and 15% of all police reported vehicle traffic crashes on US roads. [0]
  • In a 2020 survey of US drivers ages 16 and older, 37% of respondents admitted to talking on a hand held cell phone at least once while driving in the past 30 days, and 5% said they do so often or regularly. [0]
  • 23% of respondents reported typing or sending a text message from a hand held cell phone at least once while driving. [0]
  • A study of 3,542 drivers’ behavior in 2012 2013 showed that these drivers engaged in potentially distracting activities during 51.93% of the observed periods. [0]
  • The most common distractions were interacting with an adult or teen passenger (14.58% of observed periods); using a handheld cell phone (6.40%); and interacting with an in vehicle device, such as the radio or climate controls (3.53%). [0]
  • Over 80% of drivers admit to dangerous behavior while driving, such as changing clothes, steering with a foot, painting nails, or even shaving. [0]
  • A study of 1,006 drivers ages 14 18 found that 27% of them admitted to sometimes changing clothes or shoes while driving. [0]
  • Among distracted drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2019, the most frequent (62%). [0]
  • The next most frequent (13%) distraction was cellphone use, followed by external objects or events (7%). [0]
  • 20% of drivers say they’ve styled their hair from behind the wheel. [0]
  • One survey of drivers in six countries found that 35% admitted to changing their clothes while driving, 13% admitted to applying makeup while driving, and 15% admitted to engaging in sexual activity while driving. [0]
  • In 2020, 22.7% of drivers reported that they typed or sent email or a text message on a hand held cell phone within the past 30 days. [0]
  • 82% of American teens have a cell phone. [0]
  • 52% of these teens note that they talk on the phone while driving and 32% text on the road. [0]
  • 61% of drivers say texting is only acceptable if they have a handsfree, voice activated option; 34% say if it’s an emergency; 24% say never. [0]
  • Alcohol impaired driving accounts for more than 30% of all driving fatalities each year. [0]
  • The rate of under21 drunk driving fatalities per 100,000 population has declined by 29% over the past decade. [0]
  • In 2019, 2.0% of large truck drivers, 18.9% of light truck drivers, 20.4% of car drivers, and 28.7% of motorcyclists involved in fatal crashes had a blood alcohol concentration of at least 0.08%. [0]
  • Among persons killed in motor vehicle accidents in 2019, 1.6% of the large truck drivers, 21.1% of the car drivers, 18.0% of the motorcyclists, and 24.9% of the pedestrians had a blood alcohol concentration of at least 0.15%. [0]
  • (A BAC of 0.08% qualifies as legal intoxication.). [0]
  • Among drivers involved in fatal wrongway crashes on divided highways in 20102018, 60.1% of the wrongway drivers had blood alcohol concentrations of 0.08% or more, compared with 11.0% for the right. [0]
  • For drivers aged 16 20, the chance of a fatal crash with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% is 10 times as high as with a of zero. [0]
  • The survey found that 1.5% of drivers had BACs at or above 0.08%. [0]
  • This compares with 7.5% in a 1973 survey. [0]
  • In 2018, 9% of car drivers ages 70 and older had blood alcohol concentrations of 0.08% or more, compared with 19% for ages 6069 and 35% for drivers ages 16. [0]
  • It is estimated that 25% of crash deaths could be prevented if all motor vehicle drivers with blood alcohol concentrations of 0.08% or more were prevented from driving. [0]
  • Among bicyclists ages 16 and older who were killed in 2019, 21% had a blood alcohol concentration at or above 0.08%. [0]
  • In 16% of bicyclist fatalities in 2019 in which the bicyclist was struck by a car, the bicyclist, not the driver, had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or greater. [0]
  • This compares with 8% of bicyclist fatalities in which the car driver, not the bicyclist, was legally intoxicated; and 3% of bicyclist fatalities in which both the bicyclist and the car driver were legally intoxicated. [0]
  • In 2019, 42% of pedestrians 16 and older killed in nighttime. [0]
  • crashes had blood alcohol concentrations at or above 0.08% , compared with 61% in 1982. [0]
  • The rate of high BACs among pedestrians 16 and older killed in daytime crashes in 2018 was 23%, compared with 27% in 1982. [0]
  • In 26% of pedestrian fatalities in 2019 in which the pedestrian was struck by a car, the pedestrian, not the driver, had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or greater. [0]
  • This compares with 7% of pedestrian fatalities in which the car driver, not the pedestrian, was legally intoxicated; and 5% of pedestrian fatalities in which both the pedestrian and the car driver were legally intoxicated. [0]
  • The number of alcohol positive drivers killed in crashes who also tested positive for drugs increased by 16% from 2006 to 2016. [0]
  • Among drug positive drivers killed in crashes in 2016, 4% tested positive for both marijuana and opioids, 16% for opioids only, 38% for marijuana only, and 42% for other drugs. [0]
  • 50 mg of diphenhydramine can impair your driving more than a blood alcohol concentration of 0.10%. [0]
  • (The legal limit for BAC is under 0.08% in most US states.). [0]
  • A study found that taking benzodiazepine medications increases the driver’s chance of a vehicle crash by 60 80%, compared with not taking these medications. [0]
  • Taking benzodiazepines along with alcohol makes it 7.7 times as likely that the driver will be involved in a crash. [0]
  • The common cold can increase a driver’s reaction time about as much as a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08%. [0]
  • It is estimated that 0.08% of commercial drivers have a blood alcohol concentration of at least 0.04% while on the road. [0]
  • (The standard error of this estimate is 0.03%.). [0]
  • Furthermore, it is estimated that 0.8% of commercial drivers have used drugs while on the road. [0]
  • (The standard error for this estimate is 0.3%.). [0]
  • 35% of US drivers sleep less than the recommended seven hours daily. [0]
  • It is estimated that in 2017, 91,000 police reported crashes involved drowsy drivers. [0]
  • These crashes led to an estimated 50,000 people injured and nearly 800 deaths. [0]
  • A study conducted in 20102013 of the behavior of more than 3,500 drivers found that driver drowsiness was a factor in 8.89.5% of all vehicle crashes and 10.6 10.8% of vehicle crashes that resulted in major property damage, airbag deployment, or injury. [0]
  • Drowsiness was a factor in 17.7% of the crashes that occurred in darkness. [0]
  • (A driver was considered drowsy if his or her eyes were closed at least 12% of the time during his or her monitoring period.). [0]
  • A study of 3,541 drivers conducted in 20122013 found that drivers with shift work sleep disorder were 7.50 times as likely to have a crash or near crash than control drivers. [0]
  • Female drivers with restless leg syndrome were 2.26 times as likely to have a crash or near crash, and drivers with insomnia were 1.49 times as likely. [0]
  • Being awake for 18 hours straight can impair driving as much as a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05%. [0]
  • Driving while sleepy can make a driver approximately twoanda half times as likely to have a motor vehicle accident. [0]
  • Men (17%) are three times as likely as women (5%). [0]
  • A survey of US drivers in 2020 found that 95% of them viewed drowsy driving as very or extremely dangerous. [0]
  • Nevertheless, 17.3% of them admitted that at least once in the past 30 days, they had driven while being so tired that they had a hard time keeping their eyes open. [0]
  • In 2001 2003, truck driver fatigue was associated with 13% of serious truck crashes. [0]
  • Teens aged 15 20 without driver education are responsible for 91% of teen driver crashes. [0]
  • 53% of motor vehicle crash deaths among teenagers occurred on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. [0]
  • 20% of female teens and 24% of male teens who crash say they were distracted by a passenger before the crash occurred. [0]
  • In a study of driving behavior, during the learner period, adolescent drivers were 67% more likely to have a crash or near crash than experienced adult drivers and 4% more likely to engage in risky driving. [0]
  • In the first year of independent driving, however, adolescent drivers were 6.51 times as likely to have a crash or near crash as experienced adult drivers, and 3.95 times as likely to engage in risky driving. [0]
  • In 2019, 20% of all traffic fatalities were among people aged 65 years and older. [0]
  • In 2019, older drivers comprised 20% of all licensed drivers and accounted for 15% of all fatal traffic crashes. [0]
  • From 2010 through 2019, the population of Americans aged 65 and older increased by 34%. [0]
  • In this same period, traffic fatalities in this age group increased by 31%, including an increase of 39% for older male drivers and an increase of 12% for older female drivers. [0]
  • Among passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes in 2019, 71% of those aged 65 and older were restrained, compared with 48% of those under age 65. [0]
  • Among drivers ages 80 and greater who were involved in fatal crashes in 2018, multiplevehicle crashes accounted for 39% of fatal crashes, compared with 20% for drivers ages 16. [0]
  • In crashes in 2019 involving drivers aged 70 or older, 73% of the people who died were either the drivers themselves (59%) or their older passengers (14%). [0]
  • The rate of fatalities per capita among older people has decreased by 43% since 1975. [0]
  • In 2018, crashes of large trucks accounted for 11% of all motor vehicle crash deaths. [0]
  • In 2019, approximately 57% of all fatal US crashes involving large trucks occurred in rural areas, 25% occurred on interstate highways, and 13% fell into both categories by occurring on rural interstate highways. [0]
  • In 2019, 36% of all fatal large truck crashes, 22% of all injury crashes, and 20% of all propertydamage only crashes involving large trucks occurred between 6 p.m. and. [0]
  • In 2019, 83% of fatal crashes involving large trucks and 86% of nonfatal crashes occurred on weekdays. [0]
  • Nevertheless, 20.0% of fatal large truck crashes occurred when the speed limit was 6065 mph, nearly as many (19.2%). [0]
  • In 2019, 33 percent of work zone fatal crashes and 14 percent of work zone injury crashes involved at least one large truck. [0]
  • Of the 22,746 hazardous materials transportation incidents in 2019, only 226 (1%). [0]
  • About 72% of the incidents occurred during loading or unloading. [0]
  • Two percent of the large trucks involved in fatal, injury, or propertydamage only crashes in 2019 were carrying hazardous materials cargoes. [0]
  • Hazardous materials were released from 17% of the placarded trucks in those crashes. [0]
  • Another 15% were gases of all types, and 12% were corrosives. [0]
  • Of the 3.5 million truck drivers in the United States, 5.8% are women. [0]
  • 80% of all cargo in America is transported by the trucking industry, four times as much as air (8%), pipeline (6%), rail (4%), and water (2%). [0]
  • school buses accounted for 35.7% of the fatalities, transit buses for 32.2%, vans for 13.6%, intercity buses for 7.0%, and other or unknown vehicles accounted for 12.0%. [0]
  • Of the 258 bus crash fatalities, only 35 (14%). [0]
  • Students are about 70 times more likely to get to school safely when taking a school bus instead of traveling by car. [0]
  • From 2009 to 2019, school buses accounted for 39% of all buses involved in fatal crashes, transit buses accounted for 34%, and intercity buses accounted for 12%. [0]
  • Although four to six school age children die each year on school transportation vehicles, that’s less than 1% of all traffic fatalities nationwide. [0]
  • In 2021, there were over 47,000 taxi drivers currently employed in the United States, of whom 74.6% were male and 21.7% were female. [0]
  • In 2021, 56.8% of taxi drivers were white, 20.6% were Hispanic, and 9.2% were black. [0]
  • 24.5% of US ride share drivers worked for both Uber and Lyft. [0]
  • In 2021, the highest paid 10% of taxi drivers earned $53,000 per year or more. [0]
  • In 2021, the ride sharing industry was worth an estimated $61 billion worldwide. [0]
  • About 25% of the US population used ride sharing at least once per month. [0]
  • Combined, Uber and Lyft were responsible for up to 14% of vehicle miles traveled in the United States. [0]
  • In 2021, 43% of all Uber trips in the US were travel to dinners or parties. [0]
  • 53% of Americans earning over $75,000 per year used ride sharing services, compared with only 24% of Americans earning less than $30,000 per year. [0]
  • Nearly 50% earn less than $99 per month, and 84% earn less than $500. [0]
  • Only 2% of Uber drivers earn more than $1,500 per month, and none earn more than $2,000. [0]
  • Seat belt Statistics If you are not wearing a seat belt, you are 30 times more likely to be ejected from your vehicle during a crash. [0]
  • found that 12% of the respondents admitted to not wearing a seatbelt at least once while driving in the past 30 days, and 3% said they drive without wearing a seatbelt often or regularly. [0]
  • Men are 10% less likely to wear seat belts than women. [0]
  • Adults aged 18 34 are less likely to wear seat belts than those 35 or older. [0]
  • In 2017, seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives. [0]
  • For drivers and frontseat passengers, wearing seat belts in a car reduces the risk of fatal injury by 45% and the risk of moderateto critical injury by 50%. [0]
  • Wearing seat belts in an SUV, van, or pickup truck reduces the risk of fatal injury by 60% and the risk of moderateto critical injury by 65%. [0]
  • In the center rear seat, wearing a seat belt reduces the risk of fatal injury by 58% in cars and by 75% in SUVs, vans, and pickup trucks. [0]
  • In 2019, 91% of drivers, 89% of rightfront seat passengers, and 78% of rear seat passengers wore seat belts in moving vehicles. [0]
  • In 1983, only 14% of drivers wore seat belts. [0]
  • In 2019, 49% of drivers, 53% of frontseat passengers, and 29% of rear seat passengers who were killed were wearing seat belts. [0]
  • In 2019, seat belt use among fatally injured passenger vehicle drivers ages 16 (58%), 17 (51%), 18 (48%) and 19 (48%) was higher than among fatally injured drivers ages 20 59 (43%), but similar to that among drivers ages 60 and older (64%). [0]
  • Among fatally injured occupants aged 16 19, seat belt use among passengers (31%) was considerably lower than among drivers (50%). [0]
  • In 2019, 89% of male frontseat occupants and 93% of female front seat occupants wore seat belts. [0]
  • Among frontseat occupants in 2019, 88% of occupants ages 16. [0]
  • 91% of occupants ages 25 69, and 92% of occupants ages 70 and older wore seat belts. [0]
  • One survey found that 91% of frontseat passengers wear seat belts while only 74% of rear seat passengers in personal vehicles and 57% in hired vehicles wear seat belts. [0]
  • If the passenger sitting behind the driver is unbelted, the driver’s risk of fatal injury in a frontal crash is 137% greater than if the passenger were wearing the seat belt. [0]
  • Among killed passenger vehicle occupants with known restraint use, 47% of those in the front row and 57% of those in the second row of seats were unrestrained. [0]
  • Restraint use differed by vehicle type 60% of drivers of pickup trucks, 53% of SUV drivers, 42% of passenger car drivers, and 37% of van drivers who were killed were unrestrained. [0]
  • In 2018, 49% of fatally injured large truck drivers were using seat belts, the same percentage as fatally injured passenger vehicle drivers. [0]
  • In frontal crashes, front airbags reduce driver fatalities by 29% and fatalities of front seat passengers ages 13 and older by 32%. [0]
  • The combination of an airbag plus a lap and shoulder belt is estimated to reduce the risk of death in frontal crashes by 61%, compared with a 50% reduction for belts alone. [0]
  • In driver’s side crashes, side airbags with head protection reduce a car driver’s risk of death by 37% and an SUV driver’s risk by 52%. [0]
  • Side airbags with head and torso protection have reduced crash fatalities for frontseat occupants ages 70 and older by 45%, compared with a 30% reduction for frontseat occupants ages 13. [0]
  • In 2020,94% of motorcyclists observed in states with universal helmet laws were wearing helmets. [0]
  • In states without such laws, helmet use was60%. [0]
  • In states with universal helmet laws, 84% of motorcyclists were wearing helmets judged compliant with federal safety regulations, compared with 54% in states without such laws. [0]
  • Among motorcyclists killed in 2019, 61% were wearing helmets, 36% were not, and the rest were unknown. [0]
  • In motorcycle crashes in 2016, wearing a helmet reduced the likelihood of death by 37% for the operator and 41% for the passenger. [0]
  • Among bicyclists killed in 2019, 15% were wearing helmets and 62% were not. [0]
  • Helmet use was unknown for 23%. [0]
  • One study has found that electronic stability control has reduced the risk of being involved in a crash by 7% (95% confidence limits 3 10). [0]
  • IIHS and HLDI have found that forward collision warning reduced rearend car crashes by 27%, rearend car crashes with injuries by 20%, and large truck rear end crashes by 44%. [0]
  • IIHS and HLDI have found that FCW plus automatic emergency braking reduced rearend car crashes by 50%, rearend car crashes with injuries by 56%, and large truck rear end crashes by 41%. [0]
  • IIHS and HLDI have found that lane departure warning systems reduced singlevehicle, sideswipe, and head on car crashes by 11%; and reduced such crashes with injuries by 21%. [0]
  • IIHS and HLDI have found that blind spot detection systems reduced lanechange car crashes by 14% and reduced lane change car crashes with injuries by 23%. [0]
  • IIHS and HLDI have found that rear automatic braking reduced car crashes during backing by 78%. [0]
  • IIHS estimates that equipping large trucks with FCW will reduce the rate of frontto rear large truck crashes per mile by 44%. [0]
  • Respondents were more likely to trust lower levels of automation to prevent crashes 56% would trust level 2 to prevent crashes, whereas only 35% would trust level 5. [0]
  • The second biggest concern was driver overreliance on automation 57% were concerned about over reliance on level 2, 72% were concerned about level 3, and 67% were concerned about level 4. [0]
  • Motorcyclists were significantly less likely to be admitted to the hospital if they crashed wearing motorcycle jackets (relative risk = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.690.91), pants (RR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.250.94), or gloves . [0]
  • Nonmotorcycle boots were also associated with a reduced risk of injury compared to shoes or joggers . [0]
  • In 2021, ABS was a standard feature on 16.1% of on road motorcycles registered in the United States, and an optional feature on another 16.9% of registered motorcycles. [0]
  • The rate of fatal motorcycle crashes is 22% lower for motorcycles with optional ABS than for those same models of motorcycle without ABS. [0]
  • NHTSA estimates that equipping large truck tractors and large buses with electronic stability control could prevent 4056% of untripped rollovers and 14% of lossof. [0]
  • blacks (RRadj 2.3 [95% CI 1.6–3.4]), Hispanics (RRadj 2.1 [95% CI 1.3–3.4]), and drivers in the South (RRadj 2.7 [95% CI 1.9–3.9]). [7]
  • Average annual rates were calculated as the total number of fatalities divided by estimated number of workers for all jobs for each of the characteristics of interest and are reported as the number of violence related fatal work injuries per 100,000 workers. [7]
  • Poisson regression models were run in SAS using PROC GENMOD to calculate unadjusted and adjusted fatality risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. [7]
  • We found 366 taxicab and limousine drivers died a violent death over an 11 year period at a rate of 17.8 per 100,000 workers (95% CI 16.9 to 18.7). [7]
  • Adjusted rate ratios revealed men died violent deaths 6.1 times the rate of women in this industry and violent death rates were higher for blacks (RRadj 2.3 [95% CI 1.6 to 3.4]) and Hispanics (RRadj 2.1 [95% CI 1.3 to 3.4]). [7]
  • Fatality rates were highest for the South (RRadj 2.7 [95% CI 1.9–3.9]) and significantly higher for the Midwest (RRadj 2.1 [95% CI 1.3–3.4]) and the West (RRadj 1.8 [95% CI 1.2–2.8]). [7]
  • Percent, and Rate No.%Rate(95% CI)RR (95% CI)RR (Adj(95% CI). [7]
  • Table 2Number and Percent of Violent Death*Incident Details of Taxi and Limo Drivers by Major Race/Ethnicity Groups†—United States, 2003 to. [7]
  • 2013.All Taxi/Limo DriversNonHispanic WhiteNon. [7]
  • Where reported, a majority of violent deaths (42%). [7]
  • A local road or street was the predominant location (71%). [7]
  • Robbery, when known, was the overarching motive (55%) and firearms (82%). [7]
  • bTime of incident was unknown for 37 (10.1%) taxi/limo industry workers and 1208 (13.4%). [7]
  • However, it should be noted that 29% of adult consumers in the United States do not have a credit card. [7]
  • 31,32and 32% do not have a smartphone.and 32% do not have a smartphone.33,34The taxi and limousine industry will likely remain a cash industry, and at risk, as long as a significant proportion of its clientele can only pay in cash. [7]
  • The identification of suicides was less than 2% of violent deaths, resulting in an inability to determine trends and guiding the focus of the paper to safety measures to prevent robbery related and other intentional violence. [7]
  • However, it should be noted that 29% of adult consumers in the United States do not have a credit card 31,32. [7]
  • ” The FBI’s process takes up to 16 weeks, and involves checking an individual’s records related to arrests, federal employment, naturalization, or military service, according to information provided by the agency. [8]
  • There were 2 million fewer taxi rides in Washington, D.C., last year compared with the year before, Waters told me that’s a 9 percent drop in taxi business in a single year. [8]
  • And taxi business declined a stunning 65 percent in a two year period after Uber showed up in San Francisco. [8]

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Reference


  1. driving-tests – https://driving-tests.org/driving-statistics/.
  2. statista – https://www.statista.com/statistics/294894/revenue-of-taxi-and-limousine-services-in-the-us/.
  3. bls – https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/naics4_485300.htm.
  4. ibisworld – https://www.ibisworld.com/industry-statistics/employment/taxi-limousine-services-united-states/.
  5. datausa – https://datausa.io/profile/naics/taxi-limousine-service.
  6. nih – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28665838/.
  7. ic – https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/4853.
  8. nih – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5576347/.
  9. theatlantic – https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/03/are-taxis-safer-than-uber/386207/.

How Useful is Taxi Limousine

In the fast-paced world we live in today, transportation plays a pivotal role in maintaining our busy lives. The rise of ride-sharing companies and technology-powered taxi services have dramatically changed the way we travel, and one type of vehicle that has stood the test of time is the classic taxi limousine. Adorned with sleek exteriors and plush interiors, these elongated vehicles are often associated with elegance, prestige, and even star-studded moments. But are they truly useful, or do they exist solely for style?

While it is easy to be enamored by the allure of riding in a taxi limousine, let’s objectively assess their usefulness. One argument in favor of these extravagant vehicles is their capacity. With their elongated frames and ample seating, they prove to be an excellent choice for large groups, an advantageous feature when attending glamorous social events or corporate gatherings. Furthermore, the additional space can be advantageous for individuals catering to elevated transportation needs, like traveling with extensive luggage or accommodating differently-abled passengers. In these situations, a taxi limousine can offer utmost comfort and convenience in a single ride.

Another aspect that can determine the usefulness of taxi limousines is the quality of service provided. Besides ensuring seamless transportation, taxi limousine companies often go the extra mile to provide exemplary service to their clients. From professionally trained, impeccably dressed chauffeurs to a personalized approach, these service providers create an experience that perfectly complements the exclusive aura of such vehicles. This level of service is particularly appreciated by businessmen and celebrities alike, who value not only transportation but also a touch of luxury.

Moreover, taxi limousines often offer added benefits, such as privacy partitions and fully-equipped entertainment systems, which cater to those who need a productive or relaxing journey. From facilitating impromptu business meetings to showcasing the latest blockbuster movies, these additional facilities add another layer of convenience to the ride. Furthermore, modern advancements have led to the integration of technology, enabling features like real-time tracking and customer feedback systems, instilling a sense of security and accountability in the service.

However, it is essential to question whether the benefits that taxi limousines offer come with a downside. Chief among the criticisms is the cost associated with this mode of transportation. Undeniably, riding in a taxi limousine does come at a premium price tag. The exclusivity of these vehicles is matched only by the hefty fees they demand. While it may be justified for specific purposes or to mark a grand celebration, it’s fair to wonder if the expense is justified for regular everyday travel.

Additionally, some argue that in today’s environmentally conscious society, these gas-guzzling behemoths are out of touch with the need for sustainable transport solutions. As the world grapples with climate change and depleting resources, it becomes crucial to evaluate the ecological impact that accompanies our choices. A move toward electric or hybrid alternatives might be in order for the responsibly conscious consumer of the future.

In conclusion, taxi limousines undoubtedly hold a special place in the realm of transportation due to their capacity, luxurious amenities, and exclusive service. They offer convenience, privacy, and prestige, which can be valued for certain occasions or clientele. However, questions of cost and environmental concerns ought to be weighed against the apparent advantages. Ultimately, whether one considers taxi limousines genuinely useful or a symbol of extravagant indulgence depends on the personal needs, values, and priorities of individuals.

In Conclusion

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